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37 of 37 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Back to Nature
It is so good to read a book about nutrition that does not promote any new diet! The author's message is plain and simple: Go back to nature, eat wholesome foods, and don't bother with dieting. Don't overeat; instead eat slowly, and enjoy your meals - such notion has already been promoted by Mireille Guiliano in her bestseller "French Women Don't Get Fat".

Our...
Published on May 27 2008 by Bozena Klejne

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9 of 13 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Zealous Desire To Discredit The Whole Nutritional Science Community Does A Disservice To The Reader
Michael Pollan probably takes his best shot at "nutritionism", in "The Melting Of The Lipid Hypothesis". He states, "The lipid hypothesis (for heart disease) is quietly melting away but no one in the public health community, or the government, seems quite ready to publicly acknowledge it. For fear of what exactly? That we'll binge on bacon double cheeseburgers? More...
Published on March 10 2009 by Warren Green


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37 of 37 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Back to Nature, May 27 2008
This review is from: In Defense of Food: An Eater's Manifesto (Hardcover)
It is so good to read a book about nutrition that does not promote any new diet! The author's message is plain and simple: Go back to nature, eat wholesome foods, and don't bother with dieting. Don't overeat; instead eat slowly, and enjoy your meals - such notion has already been promoted by Mireille Guiliano in her bestseller "French Women Don't Get Fat".

Our curse is processed food. The dieting industry completely distorted our feeding process. Our desire to improve everything and to separate 'needed' ingredients from the 'unneeded' ones leads us to refining most of our food products. However, our artificially 'improved' food only seemingly has the same nutritious qualities as natural food. Artificial and natural foods have as little in common as silk roses with real ones.

Processed food is easily obtainable, doesn't require much work to prepare, and, unfortunately, it is often also addictive. At the same time it is full of calories with very small nutritional content.

Like "The Omnivore's Dilemma", Pollan's new book is indeed eye-opening. It makes us think twice about what we are going to put into our mouths the next time we eat. For more reading about the danger of refined foods I strongly recommend "Can We Live 150 Years" - another book devoted to living in agreement with nature, and revealing the secrets of healthy diet.
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14 of 14 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Delightful and informative. and inspiring., Dec 8 2008
This review is from: In Defense of Food: An Eater's Manifesto (Hardcover)
I've been a very healthy eater for 10 months now, and I've lost 60 pounds. so what I've been doing has obviously been working and I had decided to stick to that forever. then I read this book, and I'm considering taking my outlook on food one step further.

Pollan can be funny at times, always easy to understand and to the point. I highly recommend this for anyone living in North America who eats food.
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20 of 21 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Good Follow up to Omnivore's Dilemma, Aug. 14 2008
By 
Coach C (Canada) - See all my reviews
(TOP 500 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: In Defense of Food: An Eater's Manifesto (Hardcover)
From bestselling author Michael Pollan comes "In Defense of Food", the highly anticipated followup to his previous masterpiece, "Omnivore's Dilemma".

Unlike "Omnivore's Dilemma" which was more of an exploration of the food that is on the typical North American dinner table. "In Defense of Food" is more of a prescription for healthy eating, and a natural follow-up to Pollan's excellent investigative work in "Omnivore's Dillemma".

Essentially, Pollan's argument is that we should eat less and eat mostly fresh vegetables bought at the farmer's market. Nothing fascinating there, but Pollan goes into depth to prove why the current North American diet is the absolutely worst diet humankind could have ever come up with.

Overall, I think most people will enjoy reading "In Defense of Food" more than "Omnivore's Dilemma" simply because it is more concise and has a direct message as opposed to the exploratory work that Pollan goes into with "Omnivore's Dilemma".
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars fantastic!, Feb. 9 2010
Very well written. Easy to understand and very entertaining. It's a great book for somebody, who appreciates food and its connection to our health and our environment. The book gives you also some easy, yet inspiring tips, which will help you to take responsibility in our society and for your health.

I have it since three weeks and read it already twice...
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Food for thought, March 26 2012
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Informative, science based without sinking into scientific jargon, filled with common-sensical approaches to very complex issues. Would recommend to anyone who is interested in thoughtful nutrition.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Fantastic Read, March 23 2009
This review is from: In Defense of Food: An Eater's Manifesto (Hardcover)
Michael Pollan's book is brilliantly written and researched and makes for an eye-opening excursion into the origins of the food on our grocery shelves. While it is full of disturbing and worrisome facts about our society's increasing distance from real, unprocessed food products, the book ends on a hopeful note, providing advice for eating in a healthy and sustainable way.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Hmmm.., Oct. 15 2011
By 
Mark Nenadov "arm-chair reader" (Essex, Ontario Canada) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
I think there's a fair deal of interesting and helpful stuff here. Eat food, not nutrients is one of his main points.

To be clear, I wouldn't consider myself an advocate of the principles Michael puts forth. But it provides a helpful corrective to prevailing food and nutrition mantras. I like how he deflates the commonly repeated and often unquestioned assumptions of modern nutrition. There are a number of places, though, where I feel Michael annoyingly falls into some of the traps that food writers are prone to fall into and there are a number of areas where I feel he might take things a bit too far. For instance, I have a less negative view of meat than he does (though he is not completely against it he does have a pretty decimated view of it and believes it should be basically marginalized to a supplement to vegetables).

All in all, though, it was an enjoyable book (and it is a pretty remarkable that I would find a book advocating a position on food enjoyable).
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Food is good, Jan. 19 2010
By 
TurboBeaver (Calgary, Alberta) - See all my reviews
I bought this book last year, and it definitely changed the way I buy my groceries. Unfortunately I live in a city, far from a farmer's market, but at least I try to avoid the processed food aisles in the supermarkets as much as possible. However, I think it's still valuable to look at the "nutritional" summary of packaged goods - not so much for the recommended daily %, but for comparative purposes when choosing between products.
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5.0 out of 5 stars best book on food ever, March 5 2014
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Pollan's interesting and informative read, and wonderful advice: eat food, not too much, mostly plants, is totally worthy of the five star rating.
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5.0 out of 5 stars A Healthy Read, Jan. 15 2014
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This review is from: In Defense of Food: An Eater's Manifesto (Hardcover)
I bought it to replace one I had been loaned and had passed on. That's how good the information is. Take the advice and turn your life around. I found that food isn't the problem with our health. We are and our choices. My friends are still passing the book around. I hope I get it back soon so I can reread it!!
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In Defense of Food: An Eater's Manifesto
In Defense of Food: An Eater's Manifesto by Michael Pollan (Hardcover - Jan. 1 2008)
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