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4.2 out of 5 stars13
4.2 out of 5 stars
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on March 22, 2016
must read the world is in big trouble
but we can fix it with a new mindset
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on January 17, 2016
Worth reading, whether you work in the trades, or not.
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on May 2, 2015
Loved it. Helps me appreciate the manual things that need to be done in our lives.
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on April 12, 2015
Such a great book - I'm recommending it to everyone I know!
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on January 14, 2015
Excellent
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on July 18, 2013
I really enjoyed this book. I am an Electrician by trade, and now teach at a College. Leaving the trade to start a new career as an educator has been a difficult transition for me. I also worked in the corporate world for some time. I identify with the comparisons the author makes with "The Crew versus the Team" When a tradesperson joins the ranks of academics it can be intimidating. The way the author explains philosphy and relates it to trades is very interesting. He convinces the reader that working with your hands and appling a skill is highly cognitative. The best quote in the book is " If you don't vent the drain pipe like this, sewage gases will seep up through the water in the toilet, and the house will stink of shit" I recomend this book highly to anyone who teaches trades or shop related classes. It is also a good read for Managers to get inside the head of your subordinates and understand how to manage effectively.
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on January 22, 2011
This was an incredible read - definitely opened my eyes as an educator about how we as a society have been conditioned to learn and work in one particular stream lined way. I ended up feeling frustrated at realizing that I have also been subjected to these methods, but somehow came out the other side as exactly the kind of person matthew talks about - a trades person first (welder) also independent (artist and small business owner) but also a professor who recognizing the errors in teaching the way we traditionally have, is hoping through practice to perhaps effect a shift that will benefit future students. i'm passing this book around my entire department. Thank you!
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on January 12, 2011
I was looking forward to reading this book based on the positive reviews but unfortunately it was extremely dry and boring. Crawford is a former professor who tries to use as many big complicated words as possible. The book reads like a Phd thesis. The author is so pompous and arrogant it is sickening. It is very ironic that he continuously rants about the abstractions of white collar jobs but then writes a book that is so full of abstract words that it is incomprehensible at times. Don't waste your money on this one. You will be very disappointed.
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In the great rush to improve our present lifestyle and secure our occupational futures, we, the workers of the world, have inadvertently trashed our appreciation for the real meaning of work. Crawford, in "Shop Class as Soulcraft", describes what many of us have lost in terms of becoming mere cogs in the industrial wheel that threatens to grind us into absolute submission because we no longer control the things we produce. This book takes both a cerebral and light-hearted approach in defining what truly constitutes an ideal workplace where the worker is an individual who enters into the joy of producing something that he or she can take personal pride in. While part of this book deals with the philosophy and psychology of why we have become industrial drones controlled by other people's wishes, Crawford offers his readers a ray of hope in the story he shares about his own decision to change. For him, an academic trained to be a 'cubical' professional, his secret passion had always been working on old motorcycles and cars. Returning to this later in his life, he discovered that there was virtue in working with one's hands. Manual labor involves an intellectual and mechanical sophistication that connects the mind with the body to create or preserve something that usually outlives and outperforms anything modern technology can build. Crawford's personal reflections are helpful in defining the need in all of us to come to grips with our identity in the workforce. To make that critical change is not easy. It will require a mindset that is given to appreciating detail, working under extended timelines, and willing to experiment with different options. The inevitable job satisfaction comes with knowing that you can work for yourself while having the ability to fix other people's problems. Crawford writes with a conviction that anyone can discover this purpose if they are willing to turn their backs on the artificial constraints of the conventional job: a slavish responsibility to the company; a continual redefining of the job; and a need to compete with fellow workers to maintain one's place.
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on February 11, 2010
I bought this book for my partner and after describing it to a few friends and colleagues 3 people I know have also purchased it for loved ones. Inspiring, I might even add, life changing book.
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