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It has no shape but fills a room. It isolates, alienates and afflicts. It has no measure but spans great lengths of time. As its title implies, grief rests at the heart of "The Grief of Others," a novel about a family who refuses to share their palpable mourning.

Each member of The Ryrie family suffers as a result of the tragic loss described in the novel's first chapter: John harbours guilt for choosing the "fun" career of theatre design; Ricky resents her generous corporate paycheck; Biscuit (Elizabeth) cuts school and becomes obsessed with funereal practices; and Paul fights a lonely battle against school bullies. The book's cast also includes the eccentric Gordie and his Newfie, who befriend the Ryeries serendipitously as well as Jess, John's daughter from a previous relationship, who keeps secrets of her own.

Cohen works magic with figurative language; her prose conveys delicacy, edginess and meaning while her tone remains free from maudlin sentimentality. The private trials of her characters and their displays of unresolved anguish hold the reader's engagement. The plot does demand a degree of belief suspension because the complexity of Ricky's tragedy, based on an unrealistic decision, damages the story's authenticity. What is believable, however, is the grace and unity each character ultimately attains.
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