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13 of 13 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars creative and intresting.
I purcahsed this book for my daughter who loves to read but found myself stealing it. (Don't worry I'll give it back) The pictures are what peeked my interest. When I realized that they were real (borrowed from vintage photo collections) that was it - I had to learn more. But there is so much more here then just the photos. The author does a great job of tying his...
Published on July 21 2011 by jernfurdle

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13 of 15 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Not quite what I expected
Miss Peregrine's Home for Peculiar Children was one of those books I discovered online and immediately went out and bought. As a collector of vintage photos myself I was drawn in by the photos but most of all by the trailer on the author's website. The images of abandonment were incredibly compelling. I was prepared for a more traditional ghost story or something...
Published on Aug. 8 2011 by Lillian Moody


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13 of 13 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars creative and intresting., July 21 2011
This review is from: Miss Peregrine's Home for Peculiar Children (Hardcover)
I purcahsed this book for my daughter who loves to read but found myself stealing it. (Don't worry I'll give it back) The pictures are what peeked my interest. When I realized that they were real (borrowed from vintage photo collections) that was it - I had to learn more. But there is so much more here then just the photos. The author does a great job of tying his creeping photo collection into a wonderfully creepy story. The ending leaves me with more questions then answers so I suspect this is just the begining for Jacob and the other peculiars.

Watch out for this book to make it to the big screen, 20th Centery Fox has purchased the rights.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars An Errie and Fast-Paced Read, Nov. 11 2011
This review is from: Miss Peregrine's Home for Peculiar Children (Hardcover)
Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children by Ransom Riggs was the October book club pick here at Gin and Rhetoric. The consensus, from the feedback on both the facebook page and, gasp, in real life, was that the book was fantastic. It is a YA title but, like any good YA book, it has lots of appeal outside of the intended audience. In fact everyone that I know that has read it is over 25, with the exception of my niece, who is 12.
The story revolves around sixteen–year–old Jacob. Jacob was very close with his grandfather when he was little. His grandfather would tell him amazing stories of battling monsters and of the fantastic children he knew in his youth. Children that had very special (think X–Men–type) gifts. As Jacob got older, he began to realize the stories that his grandfather told him couldn’t be anything more than fairytales made up to intrigue and frighten him. But, when his grandfather is brutally murdered, Jacob begins to believe that the stories he had been told in his youth were true. Thus, Jacob sets off on a mission to discover who his grandfather really was
In Miss Peregrine’s Ransom Riggs sets up what is sure to be an amazing series. The story takes place both in the past and in the present, and the transitions between World War II and present day Wales are crafted seamlessly. The characters and the plot are strong and well developed. The genuinely unique thing about this book, and I’m pretty sure that most people would agree with me on this, is Riggs’ use of photographs.
Ransom Riggs has been a collector of vintage photographs for some time, he wrote a little piece for the Huff Post about his collection that includes a sampling of some of the amazing photos he used in the book. The selections from his collection that were used in the book are phenomenal, I found that they really gave me pause, even outside of the context of the book. You can’t help but think “what’s the deal with that picture? How did it come to be taken, and who were those people?” That is definitely not to say that they detract, or distract the reader from the story. They don’t at all. My musings took place after I was finished the story and was flipping back through the photos.
Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children is a great story on its own, but that story is fortified and made even more compelling through Riggs’ effective use of photographs. The one thing about the story that drove me crazy was the ending. Don’t worry, this isn’t a spoiler. It’s just that the book ends as an obvious set up for the next book in the series, so as a reader you’re left dying to know what happens next. I guess that’s not so much a complaint as it is a compliment. I absolutely cannot wait for the next book to come out, even though I’m sure it’s going to be a while.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Spooky, Gothic and Peculiar!, Aug. 4 2011
By 
Nicola Mansfield (Ontario, Canada) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Miss Peregrine's Home for Peculiar Children (Hardcover)
Reason for Reading: I couldn't resist! This book has everything I love in one book: orphans, mysterious island, vintage photographs, creepy atmosphere and an old house. How could I not want to read it.

Here is a book that once again uses photographs and text together in a unique way. The obscure, peculiar vintage photographs are simply illustrative, but the author has had to write his story around already existing photos which enhance the story to such a degree that the book would not be what it is without them. The notes do say that "with the exception of a few that have undergone minimal postprocessing, they are unaltered." Really only one word sums up this book and that is the eponymous "peculiar" for peculiar it certainly is. This is not a fast paced book, not one that will have you racing to the end for the grand finale which may put some of the intended audience off. However, it is more meandering, taking its time, showing us all the "peculiar" characters, who and what they are, as the story unfolds.

Jacob comes to the island to get over the death of his grandfather who had told him fantastical tales of this place his whole life to prove that it is just an island after all, but he quickly learns his grandfather's tales were true. The story settles in and slowly reveals the secret of the island, the house, the children, Jacob's grandfather, and eventually Jacob's part in it all. A very moody atmospheric story that I quite enjoyed. I loved the characters and as a lover of vintage photos was totally fascinated with the photographs.

My only concern with the book is a certain tone of vulgar language coming mostly from Jacob, the narrator. There is some swearing but it is the vulgar images that certain language convey which is of more concern. The only reason I can think of this use is to show that Jacob is from the here and now, as opposed to the 1940's of the other children, though some of those boys have vulgar turns of phrase as well. I wouldn't recommend the book for younger children. Also, the book ends with the characters all set to take on a new adventure which is obviously a set-up for a second book, which is rather disappointing as I am getting tired of sequels and series these days. Whatever happened to the good ole standalone? However, teens and adults should find a rather spooky read that will keep them entertained.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars great read, March 23 2012
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This review is from: Miss Peregrine's Home for Peculiar Children (Hardcover)
this book is amazing. it is an easy read but the story that it tells is amazing. great story line and the pictures that are in the book help tell the story.
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13 of 15 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Not quite what I expected, Aug. 8 2011
This review is from: Miss Peregrine's Home for Peculiar Children (Hardcover)
Miss Peregrine's Home for Peculiar Children was one of those books I discovered online and immediately went out and bought. As a collector of vintage photos myself I was drawn in by the photos but most of all by the trailer on the author's website. The images of abandonment were incredibly compelling. I was prepared for a more traditional ghost story or something similar. What I got was a bit of a surprise but nevertheless a well constructed novel that will make for a terrific movie. If I have one criticism it would be that I found the lead character a bit immature to be believable as a 16 year old. He seemed to present himself more in the neighbourhood of 12 or 13 in the way he related to the other characters in the book. All in all money well spent.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A great read for teens, Aug. 22 2011
This review is from: Miss Peregrine's Home for Peculiar Children (Hardcover)
I loved the whole idea of this book. As young adult/teen fiction, it is marvellous! The characters are intriguing, the plot is well paced, and it brings a refreshing burst of creative possibilities to a generation stifled in "reality". As an adult, I love to find books that broaden peoples ideas of what is possible. After all, we are a widely diverse species with so much to offer if we learn to tap in to our kindness and creativity.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Yes we read books review, Feb. 10 2015
This review is from: Miss Peregrine's Home for Peculiar Children (Hardcover)
I have never read anything like this before. I was recommended this novel by a friend who only reads horror books so I assumed it would be a creepy read. I read the back of the novel and it seemed to agree that this novel would, in fact, be a creepy read. However when I begun to read this novel it became apparent to me that it was of the fantasy genre. But every now and then it had just a hint of creepiness that made the book fantastic. Riggs has created his own genre of books in this novel and I love it.

Here's what it's about:

After Jacobs grandfather dies by a accident that it seems no one can explain Jacob decides to go to the mysterious island his grandfather grew up on as a child to find out more about him. When Jacob reaches the island he discovers that perhaps the tales his grandfather had told him and the photos of peculiar people he had been shown as a child were in fact real and it's up to Jacob to save these peculiar children from the monsters that had haunted his grandfather.

All in all this book was completely unexpected with so much foreshadowing that it blew my mind. I would give it 5 out of 5 bookmarks and I cannot wait to finish the trilogy!

Check out more of my reviews at Yeswereadbooks.weebly.com
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5.0 out of 5 stars I'd want to grab it but wasn't sure how I'd like it. It's one of those books that's gotten ..., Dec 1 2014
This review is from: Miss Peregrine's Home for Peculiar Children (Hardcover)
I've been eyeing Miss Peregrine's for a while now. Every time I'd see it at a bookstore, I'd want to grab it but wasn't sure how I'd like it. It's one of those books that's gotten quite the hype but at the same time there's a lot of people who didn't like it. I quickly skimmed through the synopsis but didn't pay too much attention to it and just dived into it right away.

One of the things that I enjoyed about this book is that it didn't have a prolonged and boring beginning. It was easy to get into and didn't take long to finish. The story is told from Jacob's POV, a 16-year old who doesn't have many friends and is generally unhappy about his lifestyle. As the book progresses, we see him turn into someone who's stronger and can defend himself within a matter of weeks. The story itself is quite strange and I do applaud Ransom for it because I definitely didn't predict anything when I first started reading.

My favourite part of the book would definitely have to be the photographs! At the end of the book, it mentions that all the photos are actual real vintage photos that were collected by these people who would scour flea markets and old shops looking for peculiar photos! How cool is that?

This book was definitely something unique and I enjoyed every bit of it! The only issue I had, which I think is the reason why some people didn't enjoy the book, is that after finishing the book, I went back and read the synopsis again and to be honest, I feel that it is overly exaggerated. It's hard to explain why without giving away the plot, which can't be discussed without spoiling the story. In the synopsis, it mentions that the pictures are "haunting" and that the Peculiar Children are possibly dangerous and have been quarantined. After reading the book, I realize that these words are slightly true but I still wouldn't really consider this book to be a thriller. It falls somewhere in between the YA and Middle Grade genre, so honestly how scary do you think it would be? Not much, as assumed, so if you're going into the book looking for a haunting book, this is not it. This is a paranormal yet it's not life-scarring. So my suggestion would be to ignore the synopsis and ignore the hype and just get into it right away. Enjoy it for what it is because I truly did!

Oh and just to show how much I loved it, I ended up picking up Hollow City the moment I finished Miss Peregrine's.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Fascinating Story:), March 5 2014
By 
A. Soares - See all my reviews
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While I believe this book is geared towards young adults it is a fascinating read for adults too.

The premise: Jacob grew up hearing his grandfather's stories of living in a home with kids with special talents (sort of like the X-Men). As he aged, he dismissed these stories as nothing but fairy tales. When he is 16, something happens to force Jacob to revisit these stories and he ultimately begins a quest to find out more about his grandfather's past and uncover the truth behind his stories.

The characters: Interesting overall. In his "before" life, Jacob is a loner for the most part. We meet the "peculiars" and see them and their world through his eyes. Perhaps because of his previous isolation, Jacob is quick to latch on to this new world and begins to make new friends.

The pace: this is the first book in a series and was a good pace for an introductory novel. The second novel is already out (and I am about to begin reading tonight). This is a quick and easy read.

The bad: if you think too hard about the time loop there are a lot of questions. I've gone with "suspend disbelief and pretend its possible". I'm also a little bit disturbed by the dynamic between Emma and Jacob for a number of reasons.

The pictures: Love them! Adds a little something to the book.

Overall: definitely worth a read. Looking forward to reading the second installment (tonight!)
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4.0 out of 5 stars Works as an Audio Book as well., Dec 12 2012
By 
Heather Pearson "Heather" (Ontario Canada) - See all my reviews
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Sixteen year old Jacob Portman just wanted to be fired from his job at the pharmacy. He hated it that his uncles had other plans; they intended for him to work in the family empire, not caring what Jacob wanted to do. What he wanted was to spend more time with his grandfather. He would reflect back on the magical stories he used to tell him when he was young. A floating girl, and invisible boy, and many other impossibilities. It was easy to believe these when he was little, but now, an older and wiser Jacob knew better. That didn't stop him from adoring Grandpa Abe.

One day at work, Jacob received a frantic call from his grandfather telling him that the monsters were coming for him. Jacob rushed to his side, but he was too late. Abe laying dying, torn open by what the police later confirmed was a wild animal attack. With his final breaths, he told Jacob to find the bird and mumbled some other cryptic details.

Even with the help of counselling, Jacob was not able to let go of his grandfather's horrific death. Finally, he convinced his parents that he needed to travel to the remote Welsh island where his grandfather had lived in a children's home for war orphans. There he hoped to find some clue to Abe's final message.

I listened to the audio book version of this twice in the past few months. The second time I enjoyed it so much better than the first. This second time I was able to enjoy the wealth of detail, while the first time I was so busy trying to follow the story and time lines. This was read by Jesse Bernstein. 9 hours 42 minutes. From Books on Tape. The descriptions were so vivid and the voices so well done, that I was able to visualize each of the children and photographs that Jacob looked at periodically throughout the story. It was only later that I learned that the paper version shows the discussed photos and even images of the 'letters' which Jacob reads.

In this novel, we find that it's not easy being a teenager no matter the time period. Jacob has to deal with bullying at school, yet his grandfather had to deal with a war and with the monsters he keeps talking about. Then there are the other children at the home, they have to deal with the isolation from their families as well as from a normal relationship with the rest of the population of the island.

Spoiler Alert:

There is only one tiny thing that bothered me in this book, and it is not something that the target audience of 14+ would notice. Emma leads Jacob down into a sunk boat. They are at least twelve feet underwater, and Emma picks up a hose, clears the water from it with a little puff of air and starts breathing. Then she hands the hose to Jacob and he breaths from it. As a trained scuba diver, this isn't going to work. As I said, this is a small thing, and I wasn't going to let it stop me from fully enjoying this book.

End of Spoiler Alert

On his website, Ransom Riggs indicated that he is working on a follow up to this book which he plans to have ready at some point in 2013.
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Miss Peregrine's Home for Peculiar Children
Miss Peregrine's Home for Peculiar Children by Ransom Riggs (Hardcover - June 7 2011)
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