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5.0 out of 5 stars Merveilleux
Ces 2 livres rencontrent mes attentes ça permet de comprendre la différence entre les actifs et le passif et de voir plus loin que ce que l'on a fait à venir jusqu'à date. Ça donne le goût de partir en affaire de la bonne façon. Je suis déjà propriétaire et je vise depuis longtemps à acheter des propriétés...
Published 26 days ago by Michel Crevier

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10 of 13 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Cash FROTH Quid pro quo!
A friend recommended this book to me. I quote from the introduction "The CFQ was written for you if your life has come to a financial fork in the road." I read with enthusiasm for the first couple of chapters then the repetition in the text started to annoy. About half way it had become an irritation to the soul but I gritted my teeth and read on! By the end I was really,...
Published on Jan. 7 2004 by Amazon Customer


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10 of 13 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Cash FROTH Quid pro quo!, Jan. 7 2004
By 
Amazon Customer "dranansi" (Bridgetown, St Michael Barbados) - See all my reviews
A friend recommended this book to me. I quote from the introduction "The CFQ was written for you if your life has come to a financial fork in the road." I read with enthusiasm for the first couple of chapters then the repetition in the text started to annoy. About half way it had become an irritation to the soul but I gritted my teeth and read on! By the end I was really, really, really steamed.
The author could have reduced the number of pages by (a) 25% by dedicating this book to his wife and stating that they were poor with no assets and living out of a vehicle and off friends' graces before becoming financially free several years later. (b) another 25% by eliminating the repetition. (c) another 25% by eliminating the repetitive diagrams especially the EBSI one. (d) did I mention the repetition?
Interestingly, while the book deals with their success in general terms, it does not say HOW they did it. Indeed, the author and his wife did not appear in their own cash flow quadrant since there is no place for U [my creation] meaning the Unemployed.
So the question remained, How did they go from U and destitute to B and I in the CFQ? The answer is real estate we are told. Ok, but how does one without a job or collateral secure funds to pay the required 10% deposit. We are carefully told NOT to break the law. Real estate is key but WHERE to buy seems to be a problem. The author was magically ably to buy huge portions of land cheaply and sell with massive profits. We learn that the author learned three invaluable methods of negotiation previously unknown to him but are carefully not told what these methods were.
We are told that a true B or business owner can leave his business for a year and return to find it still functioning and more profitable than when he left it. I guess he is speaking of the fortune 500 companies then. We are told of the author's real estate properties that generate income whether he works or not. Mention is also made of mutual funds and "other" ventures. Yes, but HOW was this done...we are left to wonder.
We are then told of some failed business practices and that the majority of businesses fail however, he recommended becoming a B before moving to an I. When investing, this should be done carefully with advice of those in the know but again we are not told how or what to invest in because the author did not like giving specifics because each person's circumstance was different. ..However, in his NEXT book, RDPD's guide to investing, all will be revealed!
In his conclusion, the author reminds us to mind our own business and get into the right mind set by playing his board game CF. DUUHH!
He then proceeds to compares three groups, the Broke masses, the successful middle class investor and the rich. One group [guess which one?] has resources listed as: RDPD, CFQ, CF Game, RK tapes etc.
Finally, we live in a real world. What about persons with CHILDREN? How does this impact with day care, school fees, attendance and pick up. Funny enough, no mention is made about these entities that require HUGE sums of money to maintain, having an impact on our financial adventure!
Recommendation: Read the Richest Man in Babylon instead. It is shorter and has everything that you want to know and you can start immediately! It outlines broad principles and formulas that work which can help the ordinary person as well as the E, S or B move between quadrants and save to become an investor. It can even help the U's get into a quadrant! It talks about your family, children , wife etc. It has certainly helped me. The multiple streams of income are explained, as is the use of your money to work so you don't have to, all clearly laid out. And this book was written over 50 years ago!
Read also the Wealthy Barber, I view this as an essential follow up to the Richest Man in Babylon in the unlikely event that your eyes did not light up after reading it for the first time. This will tell you the specifics instruments available that will help you.
This book CFQ, [all 251+ pages] should have been edited removing the 82.5% FROTH leaving approximately 30 pages of material for second edit!
Comment: this book does nothing to help the ordinary citizen move into financial freedom. What it does do is ensure a stream of income for the author whether he works or not! By constantly mentioning the super rich such as Bill Gates, Ford, and so on makes one think. Of the over 220 Million persons in the USA how many Bill Gates are they? He is the exception, not he rule!
If it were possible to give negative stars, I would have here. This incomplete, rushed, advertising marvel seemed to have captured the imagination of some readers by using a diagram and re-presenting material that has been well presented elsewhere. By the way, one reader compared this book to the Richest Man in Babylon. In a word..don't. That would be like comparing little leaguers to the superbowl!
In conclusion I cannot recommend this book. It is Cash Froth Quid pro quo. We give cash; he gives froth, quid pro quo! Hence 1 star.
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Mostly More of the Same, July 2 2004
By 
Scott Miller (Caddo Mills, TX United States) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
At the beginning of "Superman 2", we are given a quick review of what happened in the first movie. This was necessary, I guess, in the days before home video and cable TV in every home. Cashflow Quadrant, the sequel to Rich Dad Poor Dad, contains far more than a quick review of the first book, and with the advent of libraries and on-line bookstores, I really have to wonder why they repeated the information. In fact, it repeats so much of the information from the first book that I question the reasons for making CQ into its own stand-alone book at all. It feels more like "the rest of the information" than subject matter for a completely separate book.
I thought Rich Dad could have used tighter editing, and if it had, it would have been a much shorter book. CQ is exactly the same way, meaning that if both were edited down to avoid repetition, they could be combined into a single, highly-informative book of about the same price.
Am I exaggerating? Perhaps, but consider that this is my impression based on the ABRIDGED audio version.
But I digress. The real question is how informational this book is. To be sure, there is a good bit of information here, but I felt a little disappointed by the end. Kiyosaki spends most of the book stating why we should change but only a very brief conclusion tells us how to begin the process.
I still have more questions than answers, and I'm starting to wonder if the Rich Dad series will actually tell me what I need to know. For example, Kiyosaki says you should typically become a B (business owner) before becoming an I (investor). What is the next book in the series? Rich Dad's Guide to Investing. *Sigh* I want to take your advice and build a corporation. I have no money (so investing is out of the question), but I'm ready to get serious, and now you won't tell me how to get started? He ends this book with the this advice: "Take baby steps." His next book gets you ready for the Olympics. Either I'm missing something or he is.
So I must say I give this book high marks for philosophy (just like its predecessor, CQ has helped reshape my thought patterns), but if you want much actual information, you will be spending more money on books. If the purpose of this series is to teach you how to have more money with less work, Cashflow Quadrant is an ironic waste of time and money.
Quick note on audio CD: the narrator's habit of extreme annunciation definitely takes some getting used to.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Merveilleux, June 28 2014
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This review is from: Rich Dad's CASHFLOW Quadrant: Rich Dad's Guide to Financial Freedom (Paperback)
Ces 2 livres rencontrent mes attentes ça permet de comprendre la différence entre les actifs et le passif et de voir plus loin que ce que l'on a fait à venir jusqu'à date. Ça donne le goût de partir en affaire de la bonne façon. Je suis déjà propriétaire et je vise depuis longtemps à acheter des propriétés mais maintenant j'en suis convaincu.
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5.0 out of 5 stars great book !!, March 7 2014
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Great book !! Apply what's written in it, and you'll see results ! It gives you knowledge to succeed financially ! I recommend it to everyone !!
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5.0 out of 5 stars Great book., Sept. 12 2013
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Great book! 5 stars, if you have been thinking about reading this book just do it because it is well worth the time. Great author.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Rich Dad's Cashflow Quadrant: Rich Dad's Guide to Financial Freedom, May 22 2013
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Rich Dad's Cashflow Quadrant: Rich Dad's Guide to Financial Freedom by Robert T. Kiyosaki is a book for people that want a change in there financial life
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5.0 out of 5 stars Justin Matthews, May 11 2012
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This review is from: Rich Dad's CASHFLOW Quadrant: Rich Dad's Guide to Financial Freedom (Paperback)
Fast efficient service with next to new quality books. I would expect nothing less out of these guys. bravo way to go.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars dissapointing, Nov. 26 2003
By A Customer
fluff & filler - same info as found in RDPD & RD's guide to investing but with about 125 pages of worthless rambling.
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4 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An absolute must read!, July 5 2004
I read Rich Dad Poor Dad which was great and got me hooked on the series, and that was the perfect warm-up for the Cashflow Quadrant. I learned more about the way the world of money REALLY works in the 2 days it tooks me to read this book than I have in my entire life. I'm 28 now, and if I had read the Rich Dad series before I ever got my hands on a credit card, I'd be a millionaire by now. Chapter 6 of this book especially blew my mind. It's very much like the movie "The Matrix". I had no idea what was really going on in the real world before I read the first two Rich Dad books and they opened my eyes up to the systems the rich use. The problem is, most people that are not born rich feel like they can not achieve great wealth, but it is very attainable if you have the knowledge and the courage to act. These books are priceless to me, and I'm trying to get my parents to read them and break out of their "Industrial Age" way of thinking that has kept them in debt their whole lives with very little saved for retirement. Read Rich Dad Poor Dad first, because it lays the foundation perfectly for this book. You may hear people complain that there is too much repetition in these books, and there is to some extent, but it only reinforces the concepts they are trying to teach you. I don't mind that all, since that's the way you remember things, just like studying for a test. Don't listen to naysayers, these books are gold!!
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5.0 out of 5 stars Great Book, July 10 2005
I bought this book about 3 years ago. I'm already financially independent using various cashflow strategies from the book. Another excellent book on this subject is Stop Working by Rohan Hall which takes you to the next level. These are the books for anyone serious about becoming independently wealthy (not ever having to work again).
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Rich Dad's CASHFLOW Quadrant: Rich Dad's Guide to Financial Freedom
Rich Dad's CASHFLOW Quadrant: Rich Dad's Guide to Financial Freedom by Robert T. Kiyosaki (Paperback - Aug. 16 2011)
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