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5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent Personal Finance Book
Kiyosaki divides cashflow into 4 (thus 'Quad') Quadrants or "sectors" (if you will) - employee, self-employed, business owner, and investor. Each of these groups or sectors are described in detail as to what type of cash each generates, how they generate the cashflow that they do, and why. Kiyosaki also details the difference between "job security" and...
Published on May 21 2004 by T. B. Vick

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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Mostly More of the Same
At the beginning of "Superman 2", we are given a quick review of what happened in the first movie. This was necessary, I guess, in the days before home video and cable TV in every home. Cashflow Quadrant, the sequel to Rich Dad Poor Dad, contains far more than a quick review of the first book, and with the advent of libraries and on-line bookstores, I really...
Published on July 2 2004 by Scott Miller


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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Mostly More of the Same, July 2 2004
By 
Scott Miller (Caddo Mills, TX United States) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
At the beginning of "Superman 2", we are given a quick review of what happened in the first movie. This was necessary, I guess, in the days before home video and cable TV in every home. Cashflow Quadrant, the sequel to Rich Dad Poor Dad, contains far more than a quick review of the first book, and with the advent of libraries and on-line bookstores, I really have to wonder why they repeated the information. In fact, it repeats so much of the information from the first book that I question the reasons for making CQ into its own stand-alone book at all. It feels more like "the rest of the information" than subject matter for a completely separate book.
I thought Rich Dad could have used tighter editing, and if it had, it would have been a much shorter book. CQ is exactly the same way, meaning that if both were edited down to avoid repetition, they could be combined into a single, highly-informative book of about the same price.
Am I exaggerating? Perhaps, but consider that this is my impression based on the ABRIDGED audio version.
But I digress. The real question is how informational this book is. To be sure, there is a good bit of information here, but I felt a little disappointed by the end. Kiyosaki spends most of the book stating why we should change but only a very brief conclusion tells us how to begin the process.
I still have more questions than answers, and I'm starting to wonder if the Rich Dad series will actually tell me what I need to know. For example, Kiyosaki says you should typically become a B (business owner) before becoming an I (investor). What is the next book in the series? Rich Dad's Guide to Investing. *Sigh* I want to take your advice and build a corporation. I have no money (so investing is out of the question), but I'm ready to get serious, and now you won't tell me how to get started? He ends this book with the this advice: "Take baby steps." His next book gets you ready for the Olympics. Either I'm missing something or he is.
So I must say I give this book high marks for philosophy (just like its predecessor, CQ has helped reshape my thought patterns), but if you want much actual information, you will be spending more money on books. If the purpose of this series is to teach you how to have more money with less work, Cashflow Quadrant is an ironic waste of time and money.
Quick note on audio CD: the narrator's habit of extreme annunciation definitely takes some getting used to.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars dissapointing, Nov. 26 2003
By A Customer
fluff & filler - same info as found in RDPD & RD's guide to investing but with about 125 pages of worthless rambling.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent Personal Finance Book, May 21 2004
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Kiyosaki divides cashflow into 4 (thus 'Quad') Quadrants or "sectors" (if you will) - employee, self-employed, business owner, and investor. Each of these groups or sectors are described in detail as to what type of cash each generates, how they generate the cashflow that they do, and why. Kiyosaki also details the difference between "job security" and "financial freedom," as it relates to cashflow, and each quadrant. Furthermore, as in his book "Rich Dad, Poor Dad," Kiyosaki describes the differences between assets and liabilities as they apply to balance sheets and income statements.
This book is a great financial tool for anyone who has had financial problems in the past (or currently), business people, investors, or anyone with a desire to have a greater understanding of what money is and how we can make it work for us instead of us always having to work for it (i.e. avoid being a slave to money both in terms of emotions and desires, as well as in our career lives and businesses).
Kiyosaki details the various types of Investors. He details 7 levels or 'types' of investors, and gets his reader to find out which level they currently operate on, and how they can move from one level to the another. And why, perhaps, a change in level is needed.
One of my favorite sections of the book is part 3 titled "How to be a Successful "B" and "I." In this part, Kiyosaki describes how to go from your current financial state to a better financial state with one short term goal and one long term plan (a 1 year goal, and a 5 year plan). Moreover, he describes the differences between that which is a risk, and that which is risky, how to work around your financial fears, making setbacks and disappointments into strengths, and choosing proper mentors to gain good financial advice. Overall, this is an excellent book to begin your personal financial growth, I highly recommend it.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Which one are you?, March 23 2004
More in-depth than the first book, yet he is still careful not to put out too many specifics (i.e. step-by-step instructions on how to make yourself rich.) Why? First, the world of business is ever changing and the book would quickly become obsolete, and secondly, the specifics are covered in Rich Dad's Guide to Investing: What the Rich Invest in, That the Poor and the Middle Class Do Not!
"The Cashflow Quadrant is about the four different types of people who make up the world of business, who they are and what makes individuals in each quadrant unique." Think of it as the sociology of individual's income.
He goes into detail about the Employee (E), Self-employed (S), Business Owner (B), and Investor (I), and how each person/quadrant generates their income, invests, and where their money goes. Kiyosaki uses a simple box graphic that shows the flow of money through a person's balance sheet and income statement.
Kiyosaki also has you answer questions to see where you stand in the quadrant and what quadrant(s) you would like to be in. From there, he explains how you can move from one quadrant to another, or utilize the power of two or more quadrants. It may seem a little invasive to some, but then again, how will you know where you want to go if you don't know where you are?
Some of the topics covered are:
Money phobias (making it and losing it)
Industrial Age vs. Information Age
Emotional IQ is stronger than rational thinking
What is BE-DO-HAVE?
Difference between risk and risky
Asset vs. liability
7 Steps to financial freedom
How the rich make money even when the market is sliding
Whose advice are you taking? and why it isn't working
Franchises
Self-assessment
Being the bank, not the banker
Pension plans
I highly recommend this book to everyone, but ESPECIALLY to those of you that are lost when it comes to investing, money, cashflow, and why your neighbor is a millionaire (and has all the time in the world to play golf and take his kids to baseball practice.) I recommend you read his first book "Rich Dad, Poor Dad: What the Rich Teach Their Kids About Money--That the Poor and Middle Class Do Not!" It's a primer to this book (and many others) but will give you a solid understanding of where he is going with this book. You don't have to, but it only takes about a day to read.
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2.0 out of 5 stars Closer to a 1.5 than a 2.5, March 18 2004
By 
D. McGrath "dmack58" (Canton, MI United States) - See all my reviews
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I listened to it on tape.
There is a great deal of overlap with his other book Rich Dad Poor Dad. If you are short on time and have other books and authors you would still like to get to, then skip it if you read the first book.
The thing I noticed immediately was the influence of the audiotape authors he alludes to throughout the book that he listened to during his previous sales days early in his career. This is not a bad thing, just that the ideas are not necessary brand-new. I would say he tells his story over and over again much like you're absent minded grandfather might. It is a good story, just that you have already heard it once or twice. This book covers much more of the psychology of the money mind set than the nuts and bolts of the everyday how to - unless of course you buy his game Cashflow for kids. (Which I did - on ... )
The four or five books the author suggests late in the book are all highly rated according to many other reviews on Amazon. You may want to research some of them in addition to or in place of this book. (Depending on your current knowledge base)
Since this is not the ONLY book on finance and investing out there that I want to read, by completing it, I would have to say it slowed me down getting to the others on my wish list - But didn't stop me completely. It is a good beginning book, especially if you are uncertain as to how to start playing the money game (according to the author by purchasing the kids game monopoly) and/or have any doubt about the direction you are headed in regards to your financial future.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Cash Flow is King, March 9 2004
The clear key to financial success does not reside in the possession of assets. Instead, in order to financially succeed, one must have a system where there is a strong level of cash flow that surpasses his or her level of expenses. The next step is the reduction of expenses. But since we all know that the reduction of expenses is limited by our actual fixed expenses (mortgage, rent, car payments, phone bills) then the focus must be on establishing a system where our level of cash flow is always positive and is always increasing to the point where it enables us to be able to rely on it for our financial well being. This is the same concept clearly proven and verified in other classics such as the Millionaire Mind and the Millionaire Brain. These two books also demonstrate that in order to achieve financial success you need to have a realistic and practical system that will get you there. In Cashflow Quadrant the idea of developing your cash flow with a reliable system that is sustainable is perhaps the most important idea that many investors and entrepreneurs seem to miss while building their financial net worth.
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3.0 out of 5 stars Repetition with meaning, Dec 31 2003
By 
Kristen A. Crosthwaite "word bird" (Loveland, OH United States) - See all my reviews
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I read this book from front to back. It is full of repition and seems as if the publisher was just out to get money(Afterall, I think he owns the publishing company).
In all honesty, I do recommend the book, but don't expect to get alot out of this book. Like with anything, there is competition. He's not going to divulge all of his secret, since you're going to be his competition. He writes this book to give a little bit of information covered by a whole lot of ambiguity. He keeps saying, "pay yourself first", but never discusses how to avoid "the man".
In any case, sort through all of the repition, all of the self-contradicting statements, and learn the core of what he talks about. Hes got many.. MANY good points, but they are hidden very well, and some are single setences in the most boring of stories. Keep learning from other books, and don't stick to this series.
However, I do recommend this and Rich Dad Poor Dad highly, since it'll get you thinking outside of the box. The last few pages of this book sum it up clearly. It is just to get you thinking another way. He does a great job of doing that.
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5.0 out of 5 stars why I'll never be an employee again..., Dec 20 2003
By 
Larry Hehn "Christian in the Rough" (Toronto, ON Canada) - See all my reviews
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My parents were born in the era where you could find a good job with great benefits, work for the same company for 35 years and retire with a comfortable pension. All through school, my teachers shared the same paradigm. I was conditioned to become an employee.
After several years as an employee, bouncing from job to job, I realized that job security did not exist in the Information Age. But how else could I make a living? Along came Robert Kiyosaki's Cashflow Quadrant, and everything finally started to make sense.
Cashflow Quadrant explains the different ways that people are able to make money. It teaches the difference between employees, self-employed, business owners and investors. It explains the advantages and disadvantages of each, and shows that most people are able to generate income from all four quadrants, as long as they are willing to learn and change.
Are you willing to change your thinking? It is possible to start this book with an employee mentality, read through the entire book, and come out the other end completely unchanged. However, that won't be the fault of the book.
Cashflow Quadrant is written in simple language. It is often repetitive. (Hmm...is that because the author is forgetful, or is there a point here that needs to be emphasized?) There is a wealth of information here that can get you out of the prison of employment or self-employment and on the path to freedom via business ownership and investing.
With my years of conditioning, I initially fought the information in this book. Be sure to approach this with an open mind, for your financial freedom may be at stake. I still have a long way to go to apply everything I've read, but Cashflow Quadrant has changed my thinking, and that has completely changed my financial future.
Larry Hehn, author of Get the Prize: Nine Keys for a Life of Victory
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4.0 out of 5 stars An Improvement Over Rich Dad Poor Dad, Dec 2 2003
By 
Michael D. Walker (Las Vegas.) - See all my reviews
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This book is designed to work on your emotional and mental approach to financial well-being and should not be expected to be a "How To" book. As the author states in the book; there are plenty of step by step books out there but few if any deal with the misconceptions and fears one deals with when trying to learn about money and becoming rich.
At first I was disappointed that this book didn't hold my hand and show me what to do every step of the way. But after reading it, I realized that it's approach is useful: You have to change your frame of mind regarding money and how you look at your life, your spending habits, whether you accumulate debt for frivolous things or for assets that will help provide you income. Why do 80% of lottery winners wind up bankrupt within 5 years of winning their millions? Because they haven't changed their approach to money and spending. So, if you want to learn a different, more effective approach to money and riches, this book is a great start. If you're looking for a step-by-step plan to become rich, you'll probably be disappointed in this book.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Wonderful Real Life Education, Oct. 1 2003
By A Customer
I initially disliked the name of his books and supposed concepts because I did not want to be a person going for riches. Until one day I received his books and game as a gift so I didn't want to waste it and started reading them. After playing his game, something clicked in my brain. Now I understand him and myself.
It really takes that to understand what Robert is trying to educate us to see. I look around and see so many people doing what they have always done by using old concepts and yet never accomplishing what they want in life. The world has changed and new concepts are needed. Robert helps us see that and gives specific ideas and yet also makes us really think about what we want financially.
Most people may not want to be extremely rich, instead they just want to be comfortable and do what they like without worrying about money again. I want financial freedom and the feeling of knowing I have the choice of choosing to stop working but that takes passive income which can be built but takes learning and time.
It takes good planning and guts to do that plus discipline and that is what Robert shares with us because the world is not as it was before and so the game cannot be played as before.
I have seen so many go for College degrees, MBA's etc. but are still working for money and unfortunately cannot stop working. I like the advice in Robert's books about not working for money but learning new concepts and make money work for us. It even works for us average people.
I share my feelings because I know what I am talking about. I once did have passive income but I did not have Robert's education at that time and did not realize that I had passive income from a "B" quadrant business. I went for a higher paying job and lost my passive income. How dumb! I could have retired 10 years ago if I had read his books earlier.
As Robert says, mistakes are OK as long as we learn from them and I have a better future ahead because of my mistakes. From the bottom of my heart, I thank him and all the people who helped him in his books.
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Rich Dad's CASHFLOW Quadrant: Rich Dad's Guide to Financial Freedom
Rich Dad's CASHFLOW Quadrant: Rich Dad's Guide to Financial Freedom by Robert T. Kiyosaki (Paperback - Aug. 16 2011)
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