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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Invaluable if you need to change your Investor Mindset
I have a read a number of the negative reviews and I think I understand their criticism, so I wanted to give my perspective and why this book is so important to me. What Kyosaki brings front and center in this book is the fact that the way an investor looks at a business (he creates) is as a vehicle to generate income using OTHER people's assets. The CEOs of the last...
Published on Aug. 9 2002 by Concerned But Powerless

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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars repetitive
while i find kiyosaki's (RK) earlier 2 books (rich dad/poor dad and CF quadrant) very motivating and helpful in changing my mindset, i am finding his message repetitive. there is nothing substantially new in this book. pleasant fun inspiring reading, but bottom line: vague generalities, nothing that can specifically be used, other the motivational stuff. it's kind of...
Published on Aug. 13 2003


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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars repetitive, Aug. 13 2003
By A Customer
while i find kiyosaki's (RK) earlier 2 books (rich dad/poor dad and CF quadrant) very motivating and helpful in changing my mindset, i am finding his message repetitive. there is nothing substantially new in this book. pleasant fun inspiring reading, but bottom line: vague generalities, nothing that can specifically be used, other the motivational stuff. it's kind of like crack, it's a hard habit to get off reading his stuff, but, in the end, i think his advice is awfully dangerous stuff. i became rather skeptical of what he was writing when he started strongly pushing multilevel marketing (MLM) towards the end of CFQ, truly slimy stuff that MLM. looking into this guy's story some more, i'm learning that this guy's book only started taking off when Amway started pushing it, thus he feels he owes them something. then there's all this stuff about the rich dad being a fake. people who have looked into the story can't figure out who he is. he has said rich dad died, then changed his story that he is still alive and in hiding. people in hawaii have tried to figure out who rich dad is, but basically it seems that either the guy is a figment of RK's imagination, or the accomplishments of "rich dad" have been widely overstated. RK also tried to pass it off that rich dad was a "composite" of several people he knew. after that, i lost all respect for this guy, he's really just another Carleton Sheets. people who have tried to research RK's real estate dealings (all supposed to be on the public record) state that his records can't be found, and RK's answers to specific seem to be extremely evasive. his statements in his books about his real estate deals seem to be very exaggerated, possibly completely fictional. this guy is a quack, his books are how he makes his money now. that said, believe it or not, i would STILL recommend the first book in his series(RD/PD) for the general financially uneducated public (like me), because it is STILL a good book, from the point of inspiration. of course, i didn't know he was such a quack at the time. anyway, i'll never buy any more of this guy's products, he's stolen enough money from me. i regret buying this last book.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Invaluable if you need to change your Investor Mindset, Aug. 9 2002
By 
Concerned But Powerless "loqutous" (Mount Vernon, NY United States) - See all my reviews
I have a read a number of the negative reviews and I think I understand their criticism, so I wanted to give my perspective and why this book is so important to me. What Kyosaki brings front and center in this book is the fact that the way an investor looks at a business (he creates) is as a vehicle to generate income using OTHER people's assets. The CEOs of the last three startups I worked for pitched ideas to OTHER investors and VCs which then gave them MONEY to start the business. They took some of that money as a salary, some as dividends and used this money to invest in. The power in this is that they didn't work really hard for someone else, save their money and invest, they took other investor's (and some of their own) money hired other people to work for them and invested the dividends and salary.
Additionally, he makes clear that there is risk in investing, but the best way to reduce this risk is to increase what he calls your financial intelligence. What he means by this is the knowledge and wisdom about the whatever investment vehicle you are using that you will gain by reading about it, taking advise from experts in the field (seminars, classes) and probably most important doing it making mistakes and learning from those mistakes.
He makes it clear in the book what his rich dad told him: "most people will try these things, not do very well and give up", "the best advise to give the average investor to be more successful is not to be average", "focus less about having the best product or service or idea and instead focus on having the best SELLING . . ."
He also states in several places very valuable pieces of information that gave me insight into how he thinks and works. He stated how he became rich by learning about owning corporations and LLCs and LLPs and used them to invest in real estate. He gave a due diligence list that he uses to evaluate apartment buildings. He even confesses at his 30% success rate in investing in different investment vehicles.
The most important thing I learned from playing CF 101 was that you have to play the game to be rich. I have become rich in the game and gone bankrupt sometimes, but I would not have any chance at financial freedom if I did not play at all.
So I would recommend you use this book as a guide and not a hand book. It will help to give you some of the emotional intelligence to deal with the pressure and risk involved with investing. But if you don't start or you give up you will never be rich.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars I am now a successful investor! Thank you Robert and Sharon!, June 20 2004
By A Customer
I have read many books on investing and picked the ears of mnay successful investors as well as so called experts. But aside from Peter Lynch's excellent books, I have never found so much powerful information as I did in Rich Dad's Guide to Investing.
Robert Kiyosaki and Sharon Lechter have produced another winner right where Rich Dad Poor Dad and Cashflow Quadrant left off. This is must reading for investors who want to make money, not just circulate it.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Not bad, but a little redundant, Oct. 11 2006
Although Kiyosaki's books are more "mind-altering" than "how to" type books, the third book in the Rich Dad Poor Dad series goes over some of the same concepts and ideas covered in earlier and later books. The Cashflow Quadrant, the contrasts between his two dads, etc-. Moreover, he uses too many metaphors and analogies, i.e. the 3 "e"s of successful invesors, the 7 investor controls, the Business Triangle, and so forth...

In general, although Kiyosaki's books are a good place to start looking with regard to becoming indepently wealthy, but may be too simplistic or may lack direction for those ready to proceed to the next stage.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Create the millionaire mindset, June 30 2004
By A Customer
According to the quote on the back of this book by Sharon Lechter;
"We can all have three types of financial plans; one is to be secure, one to be comfortable, and one is to be rich. RICH DAD'S GUIDE TO INVESTING is an inside look at an entrepreneur's financial plan to be rich."
I found the advice in this great book to be a lifesaver during the recent Clinton Bear Market and The Clinton Recession. While I saw many people lose money, massive amounts of money, I was able to shift assets into other investments and even securities and continue to make money while everybody was screaming BEAR MARKET.
I heard a statistic that during the 1987 stock market crash, while many lost their their fortunes, some became millionaires that very day. WHY? HOW? It certaintly wasn't from following conventional advice.
Kiyosaki is controversial. He is unconventional and that is great. If in fact everybody accepted his ideas, then I would be worried.
Rich Dad's Guide To Investing is a great book for anyone who thinks like an entrepreneur - who has or wants to create the millionaire mindset.
This book allows you to look inside the mind of a millionaire. But more than that, to look inside the philosophy of not just one rich man, but the philosophy and mindset of what creates millionaires.
Chapter 37- How a Sophisticated Investor Thinks is alone worth the price of the book.
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2.0 out of 5 stars Missed the boat on this one..., June 8 2004
By 
First off, I must say that Mr. Kiyosaki's previous book, "Cashflow Quadrant", changed my entire outlook on life and money (for the better). In my mind it is a classic with books like "Think and Grow Rich". With that being said I was very anxious to read his followup, "Guide to Investing". Unfortunately it was a tremendous let down. To sum up the writing style:
1. Extraordinarily repetitive. Many of the exact same stories and quotes from his rich dad provide needless filler for much of the 400 pages over and over and over. A lot of groundhog-days reading this book.
2. Many chapters end in "the rest of the book will tell you exactly how the rich do [blank]..." Unfortunately, the next chapter tells you exactly the same thing and it just never seems to happen.
3. Although I think most of the educational offerings produced by his company are wonderful financial teaching aides, the ongoing infomercial hawking his board game is almost enough to ask for a refund on the book.
Overall it seems to me like the book was rushed to print with messages that are never answered or drawn out over chapters upon chapters. There are some hidden gems though in the book (too bad there aren't Cliff Notes...). Unfortunately, it was a real fight to get through the book and find them. The comments from his co-author, Sharon, are much more succinct and sum up a lot of the repetitive stories and missed messages that Kiyosaki attempts to convey.
There are much better books to spend your time reading in my mind. Specifically "Cashflow Quadrant" and "Think and Grow Rich" among many others I am sure. Happy reading!
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4.0 out of 5 stars The Rich Really Are Different, April 14 2004
By 
Thomas Au (Hartford, CT) - See all my reviews
Poor and middle class people seek to build their income, while the rich seek to build their assets, which generate income. That's the key difference between rich and poor according to Robert Kiyosaki's Guide to Investing. He spends only a little time talking about the specifics of different investments, but a lot of time discussing the philosophy of investment.
The crossroads really begin when a young person leaves school and enters the world of work. That is when he or she has to choose between the four occupational quadrants, "E" (Employee), "S" (Self-Employed, or Star), "B" (Businessperson) and "I" (Investor). Anyone who wants to get rich needs to end up as an "I," but it is easiest to get there from the "B," business, quadrant. (It's hardest to get there from "E," the employee quadrant, while "S" is an intermediate case.) Businesspeople have to do many of the things that investors do, such as reading and mastering financial statements, and sizing up prospective jobseekers. (Managers of a company in which you own stock are really your employees.) This advantage is so large, that it often outweighs the advantages initially enjoyed by better-trained, higher-paid "S's" (like Robert's biological "poor dad"). On the other hand, Robert's mentor, "rich dad," morphed from a "B" into an "I," and got rich first before he became well paid.
Paradoxically, rich people typically invest in small, private companies (including their own) through private equities and limited partnerships, while middle class people invest in large, public companies through publically-traded stocks and mutual funds, or what "rich dad" called "sanitized investments." Poor people hardly invest at all. Rich people can function as "angels" or venture capitalists more because of their greater sophistication than because of their money, and can therefore catch small companies during their period of highest growth, before the IPO (initial public offering). On their own, people can also become rich by creating their own assets (Bill Gates and his "operating systems" are a case in point), and then become "selling shareholders" of such assets (e.g., Microsoft).
This book is just a bit wordy, and therefore not as "punchy" as the other books in the series (many of which are five-star efforts), which is why I'm giving this one four stars instead of five. Still, despite a few minor faults, it is a valuable guide to becoming a businessperson-investor. Or as Warren Buffett put it, "I am a better businessman because I am an investor, and I am a better investor because I am a businessman." Take it from the world's second richest man.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Powerfully impacted my investment results, April 3 2004
Prior to reading (...and applyiny) the advice in Rich Dad's Guide to Investing I was like a gerbel in a cage going nowhere with my investing. I was loosing money, not making money and my broker wasn't making me feel any better by reminding me that all of his clients were loosing money, everybody is loosing money, the market is down and so on.
I recalled a saying by Will Rogers:
"I am not so worried about the return on my investment as I am on the return of my investment."
Listening to brokers was causing me to loose money.
Rich Dad's Guide to Investing gives you all the keys you need to get to where you want to go. It's not theory, it's how the rich invest. It is how the rich become rich.
I also recommend Rich Dad's Prophecy which since it has been written has been 100% accurate. That is a pretty good batting average. I'd count on the rest to be accurate as well.
If you are serious about making money investing, read and apply Rich Dad's Guide to Investing and Rich Dad's Prophecy my two favorite Rich Dad books after of course Rich Dad Poor Dad.
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5.0 out of 5 stars A Guide to Growing Your Wealth, April 2 2004
By 
Amazon Customer (Pleasant Grove, Utah United States) - See all my reviews
When I first purchased this book, I was surprised by how much thicker it was than the others I had read by Kiyosaki. Then I started reading it and I was amazed by how much information there was in it! It very well explained why my family had been poor my whole life. Network marketing is a good way to learn about building a business, but you have to follow the companies systems of success, not make up your own. If you are going to buy real estate, you have to know how you are going to make money, not just think the property will rise in value. If you are going to buy stocks, you should know how to get insurance on them so you will not go jail like Poor Martha. If you are going to build a true business, it has to still run even if you are not there. That being said, I enjoyed pointing these things out to certain people I know. It is a good book, and while it may not be a great book for the true english magor snob, it is easy to read, but longer than the other books he wrote. To be honest, perhaps that is why some people did not like it. I loved it.
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3.0 out of 5 stars Decent starter book despite a few problems, Feb. 7 2004
By 
magellan (Santa Clara, CA) - See all my reviews
This is a well written and even inspirational book on how to build wealth and become rich, but there are some problems with it. The conversations between rich dad and Kiyosaki focus on the financial lessons in life that rich dad says many people learn too late, or never learn. In many ways, its remarkably similar to "The Richest Man in Babylon," by George Clason, a venerable classic which had a similar approach and was familar to earlier generations of investors.
The book makes two major points, which is that most people who get rich usually start their own businesses, work hard at making them successful, and first acquire wealth that way. Then they take the money and invest it in the stock market in solid assets that will gain in value. Since the value of money is constantly decreasing, according to Kiyosaki, why hold onto cash? Kiyosaki uses the example of ancient Romans clipping silver coins, which is how the ridges or "reeds" came to be engraved on coins, as an example, but in our time it's the government that is essentially "clipping" with policies that negatively impact the value of the money. The wise rich dad, therefore, is the one that first makes the money in business but then knows how to preserve and even increase its value by investing in stocks and also in real estate.
On the con side, as I said, the book doesn't really give much detailed advice on how to properly invest, and if you're going to play the stock market you'll need to read more than this book. I would recommend several classics such as William O'Neil's How to Make Money in Stocks (I would read this rather than his more recent books, such as 24 Essential Lessons for Investment Success, or the others) or the legendary Peter Lynch's books, such as One Up On Wall Street. Kiyosaki says the rich dad also knows how to make money in the market when its going down as well as going up. This implies shorting stocks, but the novice investor is strongly advised not to do this until he or she is much more knowledgeable because of the risks.
Despite Kiyosaki's statement about the currency, the U.S. dollar doesn't always decline. For example, if you went long the dollar in the late 90s against several other currencies, such as the Deutschmark, the Japanese Yen, or the New Zealand dollar, which got to 2.4 to one against the U.S. dollar, you would have made a killing.
As someone else already noted, Kiyosaki is dismissive of people who get degrees and work hard to have a career as a way of making money and becoming financially secure, and repeatedly mentions the hapless poor dad in the book who worked hard his entire life and yet was laid off and is now faced with the task of finding a job at age 52, and that having your own business is the only sure road to job security. However, a Rand Corporation study done in the 90s showed that most people who had acquired significant wealth by the time they were in their forties were those who'd gotten good educations and degrees, and then had successful careers, not those who'd founded businesses. Furthermore, government statistics show that 90% of small businesses fail within the first two years. In fact, in another recent study, the people who were most well off financially were those who had had good jobs and yet lived well under their means and had saved aggressively.
Simce Kiyosaki's book is light on actually how to invest, I thought I'd give you one piece of advice, and it might be the best piece of investment advice you'll ever hear. There aren't very many easy ways to get rich. As someone once said, "Real money is easy to come by; it just takes a lifetime of work." But the miracle of compound interest is one of them. Over the last 75 years, the stock market has averaged an 8% annual return. If you put $100 each month into a mutual fund, such as the Vanguard Russell 5000 fund, which mirrors the broad market, each month, and started doing that in your twenties or early thirties, and the market averages the same rate of return, you would have a million dollars after forty years. You can do this with an deduction from your savings account each month so that its automatic.
Another reason this is a good strategy is that it is a form of dollar-cost averaging. When the market is up and over-valued, your $100 buys fewer shares. When the market is down and under-valued, it buys more shares. Over the long term, you optimize your purchase price for stocks and further increase your return. Over the last 25 years, the market has actually returned almost 12%, so this would work even faster. Even if you're long past your 20s or 30s (like I am), this is still a great way to invest. Unfortunately, too many even very knowledgeable investors don't pay attention to this one great little investing trick. It insures that one part of your portfolio over the long term will probably do quite well, even if your personal stock picking doesn't with the part of your portfolio you're actively managing. It also provides you with a long-term investing program that isn't dictated by the short term vagaries of the market, which is what paralyzes a lot of people. Let the experts thrash around trying to predict where the market will go from day to day or week to week, while you stick to your little, automatic dollar-cost averaging program, which will help to smooth out the inevitable bumps and grinds in the market over the long term.
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Rich Dad's Guide to Investing: What the Rich Invest in, That the Poor and the Middle Class Do Not!
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