Customer Reviews


24 Reviews
5 star:
 (8)
4 star:
 (4)
3 star:
 (7)
2 star:
 (4)
1 star:
 (1)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favourable review
The most helpful critical review


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Great Book with some Flaws
With a combination of an interesting cast of characters and a variety of plot twists, Elizabeth Peters' makes "Seeing A Large Cat" one entertaining mystery book recommendable to anyone with free time. This being my first experience with the Amelia Peabody series, I found the book easy to follow without having to worry about what occurred in the previous books of the...
Published on May 2 2000 by Vay Lu

versus
3.0 out of 5 stars Fun fluff
This is a fun, quick read...perfect for a plane ride or a lazy afternoon. It's a historic, aristocratic murder mystery...an old-fashioned who-dunnit placed in Egypt at the beginning of the century, when archaeological discoveries were in their prime.
The main characters are a family of noted egyptologists well known not only for their famed discoveries (tombs,...
Published on Oct. 5 2000 by Kindle Customer


‹ Previous | 1 2 3 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Great Book with some Flaws, May 2 2000
By 
Vay Lu (Los Angeles, California) - See all my reviews
With a combination of an interesting cast of characters and a variety of plot twists, Elizabeth Peters' makes "Seeing A Large Cat" one entertaining mystery book recommendable to anyone with free time. This being my first experience with the Amelia Peabody series, I found the book easy to follow without having to worry about what occurred in the previous books of the series. This is in part due to the author's excellent job in developing the main characters. Throughout the book, we are constantly reminded of the personality of each character through their actions. Take the son, Ramses, for example. The mother, Amelia Peabody, is constantly reminiscing about Ramses' troublesome childhood while at the same time, admiring the person that Ramses has now matured into. This gives the reader a general history of the character of Ramses as well as a brief understanding of why Ramses is the type of man that he is. This leads us to share in the mother's admiration for the son's maturation. The character Ramses is also defined through his actions that are often deeds of heroism and integrity. Another aspect that makes this book so enjoyable was its constant twists in the plot. There were so many that I was constantly left wondering what would happen next as well as what was fact and what was fiction. The author's ability to develop so many subplots and at the same time attempt to tie it into the main plot was outstanding. This added to the awesome suspense of this book. The setting was also a factor in the success of this book. The cities that were mentioned in this book, such as Luxor and the Valley of the Kings, are often associated with the tombs and the dead pharaohs of ancient Egypt. I believe that the author purposefully picked these sites as the setting to generate emotions of mystery and adventure in this book. From my point of view, Elizabeth Peters was successful in her endeavors.
However, there were some low points in this book as well. At specific parts of the book, we encounter three different subplots where it could be easy to confuse the progression of one plot with the other. For instance, every now and then I found myself having to stop reading and skimming back to reassure myself of what Amelia Peabody was looking for or whether she was looking for anything at all. Also, there were points in the book in which the plot was very slow in developing. As a result, this may have taken a little luster away from this book. Despite these facts, I thought the character development and the suspense created by the plot twists as well as its mysterious Egyptian setting, was a successful formula in making "Seeing a Large Cat" a great mystery novel.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2.0 out of 5 stars Very Disappointed!, July 6 2004
By A Customer
I am a huge fan of the Amelia Peabody Series, but this is the last book I will read in it. I have to agree with the other negative reviews. This is the first one that didn't really seem like the good old reliable Peabody novel. I agree that Nefret is simply annoying and too much a focus of the book, to the detriment of developing Ramses. What happened to Ramses's great personality??? The "Manuscript H" added very little to the story or the characterizations. In fact it was boring: compare that to the hilarity of Ramses's letters in Snake, Crocodile and Dog! None of the spark and wit was there.
Ramses did't even seem like the same person. Emerson has been shunted to the background and rendered totally minor. The great humor of the previous books seems completely gone. I've always thought the only thing this series had going for it was the humor and the characterizations: without that, it just becomes kind of rote and dull.
In fact, this book was so lacking inthe usual Peabody charm that I seriously wonder if someone else wrote it, or Ms. Peters/Mertz just couldn't care less anymore.

Still the first 8 in the series are wonderful reads I will always cherish.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4.0 out of 5 stars Splendid new direction for a long-running series, Jan. 21 2004
By 
Robert P. Inverarity (Silicon Valley, California, United States) - See all my reviews
The Peabody series rebounds after the uneven Hippopotamus Pool, but rather than returning to the tone of the pre-Nefret books, it takes off in a new direction. The "children"-- calculating Ramses, gutsy Nefret, and gentle David-- come into their own here, though sixteen-year old Ramses still, at times, seems older than his two comrades combined. Peters allows the readers access to the minds of these three through the device of "Manuscript H," which provides a welcome contrast to Amelia's familiar but none too reliable way of recounting events.
This volume has a smaller cast of characters than some of its predecessors; a handful of familiar faces is balanced by a handful of new ones, but the mystery benefits rather than suffers from this reduced cast. It's a unique case this time, with no pesky journalists needed to lend the events an air of exoticism. The juxaposition of a medium, her delusional client, a five-year-old disappearence and a highly unconventional mummy create a blend of a genuinely interesting plot and the characterization and dialogue at which Peters excels.
Darkness begins to creep into this once-lighthearted (in spite of all the murders) series, as foreshadowed conflict between the three children builds to premonitory images of doom at the novel's end. In other words, proceed directly to The Ape Who Guards the Balance if you want answers... though you may not like what you find.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


3.0 out of 5 stars Fun fluff, Oct. 5 2000
This is a fun, quick read...perfect for a plane ride or a lazy afternoon. It's a historic, aristocratic murder mystery...an old-fashioned who-dunnit placed in Egypt at the beginning of the century, when archaeological discoveries were in their prime.
The main characters are a family of noted egyptologists well known not only for their famed discoveries (tombs, mummies, you know..) but for their spate of crime solving successes. Each family member has an over-the-top persona, and the dialog is hilarious due to both the aristocratic flair and the high-drama egos.
The mystery is fairly simplistic, but it's really more about the style than the substance. This novel is high-camp all the way, which makes for a fun, amusing read. There is an entire series of mysteries with this family/setting, but, honestly, one was enough for me. As goofy and fun as this one was, I certainly wasn't intrigued by the characters--as, clearly, the author intended me to be--I was, rather, amused and slightly annoyed with them.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


3.0 out of 5 stars Good Gad! Let's not move so slow!, May 2 2000
By 
An anonymous warning, a desperate plea for help from an old friend, and a mysterious attack on her son serve as the prelude for Amelia Peabody latest adventure in the deserts of Egypt. Elizabeth Peters' popular heroine returns in Seeing A Large Cat for a tale of romance, murder, and deceit. Accompanying the witty detective on her journey is her usual cast of characters - husband Emerson, son Ramses, and the family's two Arabic companions Nefret and David. In this latest adventure, a routine excavating expedition in the Valley of the Kings takes an interesting turn when the family receives an anonymous note warning them to stay away from "Tomb Twenty-A." While Amelia and Emerson struggle to figure out why they have been warned about a tomb which is not known to exist, Ramses enters into what will become an extremely complicated relationship with an American named Dolly Bellingham. The daughter of a southern Civil War veteran, Dolly's seductiveness and cunningness lead Ramses into several dangerous situations. Further complicating matters is a desperate plea from Amelia's old friend Enid Frasier, who's husband has seemingly gone mad over unexplainable dreams of an ancient Egyptian princess. With this premise, the family stakes out the mysterious Tomb Twenty-A, which does turn out to exist - but it's not anything that anyone could have expected. The "ancient" tomb contains the body of a woman who has been dead no more than a few years. Having made this harrowing discovery, Amelia and friends find themselves plunged into a dangerous quest to solve this mysterious murder. Seeing A Lage Cat was the first Elizabeth Peters mystery novel that I have ever read. I enjoyed her vivid depiction of Victorian society, as well as her detailed and humerous portrayal of the normal cast of characters. Peters successfully integrates a high amount of character development into her storyline, providing the reader with several good instances of comic relief. On the whole however, the story is often tedious and slow-moving. Peters often seems to space the development of the plot between long passages of irrelevant character development or social interactions. As the book progressed, I found myself drawn closer to the storyline, but still occasionally found myself bored while reading through seemingly meaningless side episodes. On the whole, Seeing a Large Cat makes for good leisure reading, but if you're looking for a really captivating and thrilling mystery novel you won't find it here.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


3.0 out of 5 stars Good, but not great., May 2 2000
By 
Tim Lin (Los Angeles) - See all my reviews
This is the first of the novels by Elizabeth Peters that I have read and although I thought it was a great book, I feel that it will be the only one I read in a long time. Peters, in this particular novel does a good job in portraying the characters. I immediately had an idea of how each character acts and thinks. Although the assorted interactions were entertaining to read and help me "get to know" them, they seemed to take up a lot of time. Consequently, the plot seemed long and tedious. The plot started out slow. Once it got going, it was entertaining and reading the remainder half went by quickly. However, this long development process was too long for me and made me somewhat tired of reading the first half. The most entertaining aspect of the book was the characters. I loved how Ramses, although only 16 years old, has already gone through so much in his life. Additionally, Nefret was hands down my favorite because of her sensuous ways with men. Overall, I found this book entertaining. Although the plot did not appeal to me as much as I thought it would, the character development more than made up for it. I would recommend this book to all. Although there are many better mystery novels out there, this one will guarantee to entertain.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


3.0 out of 5 stars The "clever" Amelia Peabody, May 2 2000
By 
Elizabeth Peters' Seeing a Large Cat is an interesting mystery that has given me mixed reactions, but in general I found the novel enjoyable. On the one hand, there is Amelia Peabody, the extraordinary woman who wears more hats than most women of the Victorian era. She runs her household, works alongside her infamous husband Radcliff Emerson, as an Egyptologist, and indulges herself in solving a multifaceted mystery. Amelia and her husband are both quite known for their tomb excavating talents in the Valley of the Kings in Egypt. Therefore, it is of no surprise that they find themselves targets for the revealing of a mysterious murder. The antisocial Emerson at first is uninterested with the mystery, but is easily convinced by Amelia's persistence. This season's excavation now has a new focus, the mysterious Tomb Twenty-A and its nontraditional mummy. Using the techniques of a traditional mystery, Peters has completely isolated characters some how all fit together and the reader is taken on a roller-coaster ride of murder, deceit, foul play, love, friendship, and a happy ending. Peters saved this mystery by including Ramses' journal and having his account of some crucial moments in the mystery. This allows the reader see that Amelia Peabody, who thinks of herself as quite clever, sometimes is faced with her "young" son, as well as others, finding crucial information before her. I found this very amusing and made the mystery more enjoyable.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4.0 out of 5 stars Curiosity Killed The Cat, May 1 2000
By 
Juliana Hsu (The City of Angels, CA) - See all my reviews
Elizabeth Peters' ninth novel in her series, "Seeing a Large Cat," illustrates the adventurous life of Amelia Peabody in Egypt. Amelia Peabody and her family are caught in a net of hidden tombs, a mummy who wears blue, silk underwear and mysterious attacks on a visiting American woman and Peabody's son Ramses. Together the English family risks their safety and lives to find the murderer of the mummy, and the reason for their presence in Egypt. While the extended number of characters was somewhat hard to keep track of, the novel is quick-paced and intriguing. Peters' references historical sites of Egypt like the Valley of the Kings, Queen Hatchepsut's Tomb and Gizeh to create a distinct environment and add to the realism of this mystery. She utilizes beliefs and superstitions of Egyptian culture to enhance her writing. For example, the large cat Amelia dreams of symbolizes good luck, and it also references the maturation of Peabody's son, Ramses. Ramses must accept the death of one pet cat and learn to love another; he accepts change and learns to embrace it. Throughout the novel he gains the respect and trust of Amelia, signified by the drinking of whisky and soda with his mother. Peters' development of Ramses's coming-of-age character creates a multi-facet novel that illustrates both adventure and family relationships. Overall I enjoyed "Seeing A Large Cat" because it is a mysterious novel that incorporates history, family, deceit and wonder.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2.0 out of 5 stars Tedious, July 12 1999
By A Customer
After struggling through this book, I tried to figure out what made this book so tedious compared to the previous Amelia Peabody mysteries (I am a HUGE fan of all the previous Amelia Peabody novels). I finally decided that it was getting around Nefret that made this book so hard to get through. The character of Nefret adds absolutely nothing to the stories and actually makes them hard to read. Quite frankly, she's BOORISH. Apparently she's supposed to have "the heart of a man" but if this is so, it is a man I wouldn't want to know. I would be put off by any man that behaved in that manner. I see no charm in extremely boorish and uncouth behaviour. If we were to compare Nefret to Dolly (whom everyone has an aversion to), we could see that Nefret is just flaunting her "manliness" just the same as Dolly is flaunting her "feminism"--neither have any REAL substance. Dolly giggles/Nefret curses. Dolly dresses in fancy clothes and corsets and hangs on men/Nefret dresses in tight pants, unbuttons the top buttons of her shirt and deliberately pulls up her pants leg in front of three men. There are many comparisons and neither Dolly or Nefret hold any charm for the reader and shouldn't hold any charm for any of the characters in the book if the characters hold true. Is Nefret just another brainless bimbo who is just trying to show off and get attention by "acting like a man"??? So it would seem. It's too tiresome to read through all that muck. Take her out of the stories and they will move along much faster and be MUCH more interesting.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars Absolutely amazing!, May 10 1999
By A Customer
Being an avid fan of Egyptology and mysteries, I was fortunate to find Elizabeth Peters and of course Amelia Peabody. I must say that out of the entire series, this is the absolute best. No longer is Ramses the aggravating fountain of verbosity but a young man who you really get to know. I accidently purchased this book before The Hippotomas Pool and was wondering how this mysterious David fit into the picture...but now I am almost finished with the latter (though dissapointed with the story so far). As far as everything else goes in "Seeing a Large Cat" I couldn't be happier as far as the characters go...Peters' novels seem to fare better when the villian is unknown and this one took the cake as far as that goes. Compared to some of her other books, haveing fewer characters is much easier to read, especially when they aren't all Arabic names (that get's tedious!). Peters' really knows how to keep her readers hanging, the last couple of paragraphs in the book left me flipping pages to see if there were any left...I cannot wait to see what happens between Ramses, Nefret and David. Some of the references made to these three made my jaw drop...Ramses and Nefret? One can only see what develops!!!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


‹ Previous | 1 2 3 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

This product

Seeing a Large Cat
Seeing a Large Cat by Elizabeth Peters (Paperback - Feb. 27 2003)
Used & New from: CDN$ 0.66
Add to wishlist See buying options
Only search this product's reviews