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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Great Book with some Flaws
With a combination of an interesting cast of characters and a variety of plot twists, Elizabeth Peters' makes "Seeing A Large Cat" one entertaining mystery book recommendable to anyone with free time. This being my first experience with the Amelia Peabody series, I found the book easy to follow without having to worry about what occurred in the previous books of the...
Published on May 2 2000 by Vay Lu

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3.0 out of 5 stars Fun fluff
This is a fun, quick read...perfect for a plane ride or a lazy afternoon. It's a historic, aristocratic murder mystery...an old-fashioned who-dunnit placed in Egypt at the beginning of the century, when archaeological discoveries were in their prime.
The main characters are a family of noted egyptologists well known not only for their famed discoveries (tombs,...
Published on Oct. 5 2000 by TaraJacobs


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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Great Book with some Flaws, May 2 2000
By 
Vay Lu (Los Angeles, California) - See all my reviews
With a combination of an interesting cast of characters and a variety of plot twists, Elizabeth Peters' makes "Seeing A Large Cat" one entertaining mystery book recommendable to anyone with free time. This being my first experience with the Amelia Peabody series, I found the book easy to follow without having to worry about what occurred in the previous books of the series. This is in part due to the author's excellent job in developing the main characters. Throughout the book, we are constantly reminded of the personality of each character through their actions. Take the son, Ramses, for example. The mother, Amelia Peabody, is constantly reminiscing about Ramses' troublesome childhood while at the same time, admiring the person that Ramses has now matured into. This gives the reader a general history of the character of Ramses as well as a brief understanding of why Ramses is the type of man that he is. This leads us to share in the mother's admiration for the son's maturation. The character Ramses is also defined through his actions that are often deeds of heroism and integrity. Another aspect that makes this book so enjoyable was its constant twists in the plot. There were so many that I was constantly left wondering what would happen next as well as what was fact and what was fiction. The author's ability to develop so many subplots and at the same time attempt to tie it into the main plot was outstanding. This added to the awesome suspense of this book. The setting was also a factor in the success of this book. The cities that were mentioned in this book, such as Luxor and the Valley of the Kings, are often associated with the tombs and the dead pharaohs of ancient Egypt. I believe that the author purposefully picked these sites as the setting to generate emotions of mystery and adventure in this book. From my point of view, Elizabeth Peters was successful in her endeavors.
However, there were some low points in this book as well. At specific parts of the book, we encounter three different subplots where it could be easy to confuse the progression of one plot with the other. For instance, every now and then I found myself having to stop reading and skimming back to reassure myself of what Amelia Peabody was looking for or whether she was looking for anything at all. Also, there were points in the book in which the plot was very slow in developing. As a result, this may have taken a little luster away from this book. Despite these facts, I thought the character development and the suspense created by the plot twists as well as its mysterious Egyptian setting, was a successful formula in making "Seeing a Large Cat" a great mystery novel.
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2.0 out of 5 stars Very Disappointed!, July 6 2004
By A Customer
I am a huge fan of the Amelia Peabody Series, but this is the last book I will read in it. I have to agree with the other negative reviews. This is the first one that didn't really seem like the good old reliable Peabody novel. I agree that Nefret is simply annoying and too much a focus of the book, to the detriment of developing Ramses. What happened to Ramses's great personality??? The "Manuscript H" added very little to the story or the characterizations. In fact it was boring: compare that to the hilarity of Ramses's letters in Snake, Crocodile and Dog! None of the spark and wit was there.
Ramses did't even seem like the same person. Emerson has been shunted to the background and rendered totally minor. The great humor of the previous books seems completely gone. I've always thought the only thing this series had going for it was the humor and the characterizations: without that, it just becomes kind of rote and dull.
In fact, this book was so lacking inthe usual Peabody charm that I seriously wonder if someone else wrote it, or Ms. Peters/Mertz just couldn't care less anymore.

Still the first 8 in the series are wonderful reads I will always cherish.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Splendid new direction for a long-running series, Jan. 21 2004
By 
Robert P. Inverarity (Silicon Valley, California, United States) - See all my reviews
The Peabody series rebounds after the uneven Hippopotamus Pool, but rather than returning to the tone of the pre-Nefret books, it takes off in a new direction. The "children"-- calculating Ramses, gutsy Nefret, and gentle David-- come into their own here, though sixteen-year old Ramses still, at times, seems older than his two comrades combined. Peters allows the readers access to the minds of these three through the device of "Manuscript H," which provides a welcome contrast to Amelia's familiar but none too reliable way of recounting events.
This volume has a smaller cast of characters than some of its predecessors; a handful of familiar faces is balanced by a handful of new ones, but the mystery benefits rather than suffers from this reduced cast. It's a unique case this time, with no pesky journalists needed to lend the events an air of exoticism. The juxaposition of a medium, her delusional client, a five-year-old disappearence and a highly unconventional mummy create a blend of a genuinely interesting plot and the characterization and dialogue at which Peters excels.
Darkness begins to creep into this once-lighthearted (in spite of all the murders) series, as foreshadowed conflict between the three children builds to premonitory images of doom at the novel's end. In other words, proceed directly to The Ape Who Guards the Balance if you want answers... though you may not like what you find.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Peters does it again, July 31 2003
By 
Cheryl A. Pelletier (Cypress, TX) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
E. Peters does it again - she's funny and savy and keeps you on the edge of your seat. Wonderful read - excellent addition to your library.
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2.0 out of 5 stars I don't believe I finish this book, March 13 2003
By 
Jorge Frid (Mexico City) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
If you think that in this book you will read something interesting about the ancient Egypt, you are completely wrong, the main story of the book is the diary of Amelia Peabody, but I don't think that if someone writes a diary will write what think another person, you can't do that, you just don't know what others think.
Basically the book is the story of an assassin who killed his wife ten years or so before this story, it really is boring and boring.
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5.0 out of 5 stars What a wonderful find, Sept. 22 2002
By A Customer
This is the first book in the series that I read. What a wonderful enjoyment! I actually listened to the story on tape on my way to and from work and discovered that it was not such a good idea. Peabody is a bit quirky and her character will make you smile, but there are some scenes that one really needs to concentrate on, and behind the wheel is not a place to do it.
I did enjoy the novel and have continued to read each new book in the series. My goal is to eventually go back and pick up the previous seven installments.
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5.0 out of 5 stars begining of a series of 4!, Aug. 10 2002
By 
i really liked Seeing a Large Cat... because Ramses got growed up!! This is really cool, because in all the previous books u kinda grow up with Ramses and your there with all his little mishaps and such and then, WHAM, he's a grown man... with a mustache. im like Amelia; hate facial hair on my men. but eventually he got rid of it, thank god. Nefret teases just a little about the mustache...and how much Ramses and David have grown up!!!
This novel introduces the infamous Manucript H, which i personally come to love and cherish. this and the next 3 are really abnout Ramses and him growing up and maturing. Of course Amelia, i think, is having problems letting her son grow and become a man. (Though she wouldn't admit to that maternal feeling)
Of course there is enough mystery and stuff to keep u interested. Though at times its a little long-winded and that gets tiresome.
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2.0 out of 5 stars Amelia Peabody - Mystery solver???, Oct. 11 2001
By A Customer
This was my first and probably last Amelia Peabody mystery I shall read. Peabody is a nosy, verbose, upper class English Egyptologist famous for solving mysteries. I found the writing to be somewhat tedious and long winded. You'll have to suffer until page 125 for any sort of action to begin. I think only the true history lover can appreciate this novel, for most of the characters are either named after Egyptian gods or pharaohs. If this is the best novel Peters has to offer I dread to think of what her others may be like. This is a fairly quick read, really only a skim if there is absolutely nothing else at home on offer. I would reccomend other authors such as Christian Jacq, PC Doherty and Michael Asher who execute beautifully the wonders of Egypt.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Full of Fun, April 3 2001
After reading some of the reviews for this book I am inclined to ask if they got it. This series has never been about hardcore mystery so much as mystery-lite with tons of characterization. I highly recommend that you not start out with this book. Go to "Crocodile on the Sandbank."
That being said, I adored this book! It was so sun to see Ramses taking matters into his own hands. As usual, there was much to learn about Egyptology, and the speech Ramses gives to David describing Emerson's feelings for Amelia (and his for Nefret) were worth the price of admission!!
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3.0 out of 5 stars Fun fluff, Oct. 5 2000
This is a fun, quick read...perfect for a plane ride or a lazy afternoon. It's a historic, aristocratic murder mystery...an old-fashioned who-dunnit placed in Egypt at the beginning of the century, when archaeological discoveries were in their prime.
The main characters are a family of noted egyptologists well known not only for their famed discoveries (tombs, mummies, you know..) but for their spate of crime solving successes. Each family member has an over-the-top persona, and the dialog is hilarious due to both the aristocratic flair and the high-drama egos.
The mystery is fairly simplistic, but it's really more about the style than the substance. This novel is high-camp all the way, which makes for a fun, amusing read. There is an entire series of mysteries with this family/setting, but, honestly, one was enough for me. As goofy and fun as this one was, I certainly wasn't intrigued by the characters--as, clearly, the author intended me to be--I was, rather, amused and slightly annoyed with them.
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Seeing a Large Cat
Seeing a Large Cat by Elizabeth Peters (Paperback - Feb. 27 2003)
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