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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on November 19, 2001
The Light Fantastic is the second Discworld book, and fits quite well with the first one, The Colour of Magic. It almost seems like Terry Pratchett was just planning on writing a two part series, but if you look at the many Discworld books out there, that surely isn't true.
In The Light Fantastic, we once again team up with our old buddies Rincewind (or is it Dr. Rjinswand?!) and Twoflower, who were last thought to have fallen off of the edge of the world, but are now running from a high council of wizards, who want all eight spells from the Octavo to be recited to save the world, but alas, one of the spells left the book and jumped into Rincewind's head, kicking out any other spells Rincewind tries or tried to learn. We have here the first appearance of Cohen the Barbarian, one of the greatest thought out characters of all time, who, in my favorite part, teaches a deadly soldier how to hold a sword by telling him to, "Put your one hand here... yes, thats it, then put your other hand here, yes... and now gently thrust the sword into your leg!" Utterly hilarous. I laughed harder at this Discworld book than any other, and you will too.
If you loved the Colour of Magic and want to keep reading Discworld, this should be the next one. However, it may be a bit confusing reading this one without having read The Colour of Magic. In that case, read that one first. Either way, though, Pratchett does a good job at helping new readers understand the Discworld, no matter what book you read, he always starts out explaining everything you need to know so you don't get too confused.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on March 27, 2002
This is the second book in Terry Pratchett's series on the Discworld--a flat world, supported on the back of four massive elephants riding on the back of a planet-sized turtle; anything hilarious can happen here, and eventually does. Rincewind, failed wizard and reluctant bearer of one of the eight great spells of the Octavo, finds himself the center of attention at the end of the world. With a party of misfits converging on him, he must keep himself and Twoflower (the Disc's first tourist) alive--and save the world, if he finds the time.
It was on great books like this that Mr. Pratchett built his reputation! Terry's strength is the ability to run several stories simultaneously without losing the reader. Couple that with a hilarious storyline, and you've got a winner. This is a great book, one that I recommend to everyone!
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on January 9, 2001
The Light Fantastic is the sequel to Pratchett's first Discworld book (The Color of Magic), and I definitely think it's better. The plot is (unlike in The Color of Magic) concentrated on one thing, and the thing is a bright red star that's approaching the disc. The two main characters are Rincewind and Twoflower, the two fellas that fell off the Disc in the previous book, and Twoflower's luggage, a box with weird temper. They experience many things that can only happen on the Disc, and some regular things, like meeting the Disc's greatest hero, the 70 year-old, Cohen the Barbarian, but the main idea of the book is them saving the Discworld from the red star.
Rincewind, an UU (Unseen University) dropout, has one of the 8 great spells the Creator left. The only problem with the spell is, it seems to have a mind of its own, and it tries to talk to him. And whenever Rincewind is in trouble, or a near-death situation (believe me, there's lots of them) the spell tries to say itself. He spends most of his time to save Twoflower from himself and the other part of the time running from people who want to get their hands on the eighth spell.
Twoflower is the Disc's first, and probably last tourist. He used to be an insurance (in-sewer-ants) agent back in his continent. He has quite a lot of money with him, and he keeps them in a box called the luggage. The one thing Rincewind hates about him the most is the fact that Twoflower believes that he can buy anything from anybody, even Death's living room clock.
Another thing pretty much everybody asks is "Should I read The Color of Magic first?" Well, I myself read The Light Fantastic first and still understood everything and got all the jokes. Pratchett does a great job explaining what happened in CoM. But no matter whether you read it first or even last, you're gonna have a great time reading THE LIGHT FANTASTIC, by Terry Pratchett.
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on January 6, 2001
"The Light Fantastic"---actually a continuation of the saga begun in "The Color of Magic"---improves upon the original, abandoning the wandering storylines of the first book and hitting the stride that is to become familiar to fans of Pratchett's later work. And while this book, in terms of its focus and writing, in many ways stands apart from its predecessor, as another reviewer has stated, it is impossible to read the one without the other, the setup for "The Light Fantastic" being established in the first book, and picking up where that work left off.
Mike Stone has done an admirable job of encapsulating the action below, so I will not trod where others have gone before, except to add that we here discover the natural history of trolls, how new solar systems are born, and observe while Twoflowers instructs Death, Pestilence, Famine and War in the finer points of "a thing you put across a river," where time allows for the play of "Another Fondle," also known as a "Rubber." In addition, a perverse---and dangerously intriguing---variation of a pogrom is carried out, and we learn all about neck romance.
As with Pratchett's best work, the author once again here shows why he remains one of the most original voices in fantasy fiction. If you don't enjoy this book you'd best look over your shoulder: a black-robed figure is likely waiting to lighten you of your misery.
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on April 23, 2000
I must admit, I read Equal Rites first, and it was so, so , literal, almost serious, that I had plain given up on the Discworld books! But when this caught my eye..... Here is featured Rincewind, the inept wizard, who, because he stole a look at the most powerful magic book of the multiverse, has a spell stuck in his head that does not only have unbeleivable power, but is also sentient! The only problem is, that not only does he not dare to say this Spell, (Though at every opertunity it tries to take him over so it can get said) it is so poverful that no other ordinary spell dares to stay in his mind for an instant! For involentaraly memorizing a Spell from the Octavo (The book that held the Spell) Rincewind was expelled from the wizard's university, (Unseen University) but now he is a guide to the naive insurance salesman Twoflower and his amazind sapient-pearwood Luggage, which follows it's ower on hundreds of tiny little legs. But now, in the skies of the Disc, a new star has appeared, that looks like a red rabid eye, and the Eight Spells are needed to be said to stop the Disc from crashing into it, but the Octavo has only seven Spells left, and everyone is chasing Rincewind to try to get that Spell! (Which they have a lot of troble with, because to get the spell most try to kill him, and Rincewind's main and prize talent is the ability to run away from any kind of danger that threatens him.) Meanwhile, at the University, a sinister young Wizard, name of Tymon, is seeking to become commander-in-cheif of all wizards, and rule the Disc! After Rincewind (after strange adventures which include talking with trolls, crashing into a flying rock, and having his sprit suffer an out-of body experiance, where for a breif time he lands in the house of Death to claim his simalarily out-of-body experiencing friend, Twoflower, and also for a breif time winds up in the Octavo) gets back to Ankh-Morpork (home of the university) this most inept of wizards must stop the Dungen Dimensions from eptying into our multiverse (whose inhabitants would not only kill people, but innore them, give them the order of the whip, the thubscrews, and who are far worse then evil), deal with an insane wizard, and stop the Red Star from crashing into the Disc!
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on June 30, 2000
I implore you to leave our boring world behind and enter the loony mind of Terry Pratchett. Come pay a visit to Discworld, where logic and reality are on permanent lunch break. This novel, the second in the Discworld series, continues the adventures of Rincewind and Twoflower (both of whom were introduced in the very first Discworld novel "The Color of Magic"). Follow Rincewind, a notoriously incapable wizard with an amazing knack for survival, and Twoflower, Discworld's first tourist, as they stumble into averting an apocolypse. And there's even a faithful piece of luggage made from magical wood (appropriately named "The Luggage") that follows and protects Twoflower along the way. Get this book! Terry Pratchett's satirical humor and literary one-liners will keep anyone laughing. And when you finish laughing you'll find yourself craving another Discworld book. Maybe you should buy two just to be safe...
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on June 30, 2000
I implore you to leave our boring world behind and enter the loony mind of Terry Pratchett. Come pay a visit to Discworld, where logic and reality are on permanent lunch break. This novel, the second in the Discworld series, continues the adventures of Rincewind and Twoflower (both of whom were introduced in the very first Discworld novel "The Color of Magic"). Follow Rincewind, a notoriously incapable wizard with an amazing knack for survival, and Twoflower, Discworld's first tourist, as they stumble into averting an apocolypse. And there's even a faithful piece of luggage made from magical wood (appropriately named "The Luggage") that follows and protects Twoflower along the way. Get this book! Terry Pratchett's satirical humor and literary one-liners will keep anyone laughing. And when you finish laughing you'll find yourself craving another Discworld book. Maybe you should buy two just to be safe...
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on November 18, 2001
After reading "The Color of Magic", I couldn't wait to get my hands on "The Light Fantastic". It picks up where COM left off. Rincewind the failed wizard and the tourist Twoflower continue their journey of the Disc. They also meet Cohen the Barbarian, one of my favorite characters. Meanwhile, Ymper Trymon, a wizard from Unseen University, is trying to find them. A huge star is about to hit the Disc, and all of the Eight Great Spells need to be said. Rincewind has one of the Spells lodged in his head. If you are new to Discworld, this book is good, but read COM first. It will help you understand LF better. The ending is spectacular and the book is seasoned with fresh humor that can only be compared to a mix of "Monty Python" and Tolkien.
I am currently working on "Equal Rites", the third in the series.
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on November 18, 2001
After reading "The Color of Magic", I couldn't wait to get my hands on "The Light Fantastic". It picks up where COM left off. Rincewind the failed wizard and the tourist Twoflower continue their journey of the Disc. They also meet Cohen the Barbarian, one of my favorite characters. Meanwhile, Ymper Trymon, a wizard from Unseen University, is trying to find them. A huge star is about to hit the Disc, and all of the Eight Gray Spells need to be said. Rincewind has one of the Spells lodged in his head. If you are new to Discworld, this book is good, but read COM first. It will help you understand LF better. The ending is spectacular and the book is seasoned with fresh humor that can only be compared to a mix of "Monty Python" and Tolkien.
I am currently working on "Equal Rites", the third in the series.
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on June 2, 2013
This is my second Pratchett novel. I'm reading them from start to finish, ignoring opinions on good and bad ones, I want to read them all and make my own judgement.

So what is there to say, hmm. Its GREAT!
There isnt really much of a story, similar to 'The Colour Of Magic'
Its basic. But thats not the point, the humor, the weirdness, the fun, the adventure is the point.
From the start to the very end this book keeps you engaged. I find the world of Pratchett is almost like a Monty Python sketch show. Skipping back and forth from the Main story, to little side lines that just act like glue in sealing the comical story all together.

It was a really great read, I really enjoyed it.
Definitely recommend it, though read 'Colour of Magic' first as this is a continuation on from Rincewind's story.
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