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5.0 out of 5 stars You too can build power and positive relationships.
Give yourself...or better yet your co-workers, family and friends a Whale Done.
Who would have thought that you could use whales as an example of how to make positive relationships, but leave it to Ken Blanchard, the master of the story to do it.
Whale Done is a great story with insightful application. It follows those concepts that they use at Sea World to...
Published on Dec 2 2003 by Amazon Customer

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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars An okay read!
"Whale Done!: The Power of Positive Relationships" by Ken Blanchard talks about the importance of building trust, accentuating the positive side of things and redirecting the energy when mistakes are made. According to Blanchard, it is crucial to provide recognition appropriately to either co-workers or family members. He uses the example of training the killer...
Published on June 19 2004 by Dizziey


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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars An okay read!, June 19 2004
By 
Dizziey (Arlington, VA) - See all my reviews
"Whale Done!: The Power of Positive Relationships" by Ken Blanchard talks about the importance of building trust, accentuating the positive side of things and redirecting the energy when mistakes are made. According to Blanchard, it is crucial to provide recognition appropriately to either co-workers or family members. He uses the example of training the killer whale, Shamu at the SeaWorld. When it comes to training killer whales, trainers have to reward the whales when they do something right to reinforce the same behaviors and that it is basically useless to punish killer whales if they make mistakes.
I think this is an okay read because there are basically nothing new here. However, I do like the "training of killer whales" illustrations that help to reinforce what Blanchard is saying - rewarding animals/people appropriately. Like a few reviewers here, I do prefer "Who Moved My Cheese?" and "Fish!" better. I also agree that some of the lines in "Whale Done!" are sort of cheesy. It's basically an okay read.
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4.0 out of 5 stars A Good Read!, June 7 2004
By 
Rolf Dobelli "getAbstract" (Switzerland) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Ken Blanchard of One-Minute Manager fame draws on the positive training techniques that SeaWorld whale trainers use to get their whales to want to perform. Although using whale training as a teaching model is a unique twist on the literature about training and motivating employees, the material itself is not nearly as exotic. Much of it draws upon traditional principles for getting along with others, such as building trust, emphasizing the positive and redirecting undesired actions into more productive channels. If you've read Blanchard's previous book about being aware when people do something right so you can praise them, some of this content will seem familiar, though he says this is his "most important" book. The story line tracks mythical businessman Wes Kingley's discussions with whale trainers who reveal what they do to train their creatures, gradually, carefully and with real warmth. These conversations blow some very basic points up to whale-size, but Blanchard writes with charm. We recommend this splashy manual, the first course in Whale Psyc 101.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Bravo! Or, Whale Done!, April 25 2004
By 
Denise Knueven (Batesville, IN USA) - See all my reviews
To you if you've picked up a copy of Ken Blanchard's book. It could be the first step toward improving your relationships both at work and at home.
Ken demonstrates how the concepts used by trainers at Sea World-build trust, accentuate the positive and, when mistakes occur, redirect the energy-can be utilized to improve our relationships-both personal and professional-and become more productive while doing it.
When Wes Kingsley opted for a trip to Sea World rather than one of the other activities offered during his business conference, he had no idea how educated he'd become. He sat in awe as he witnessed such incredible performances by these killer whales. He was so intrigued that, following the show he sought out the chief trainer, Dave Yardley, to find out exactly how he got these animals to do such amazing performances.
Dave told him how they have to build trust with the whales-you don't want to get in the water with these killers! You have to be sincere and honest, and your motives may be questioned initially depending on the relationship you're trying to repair or improve. This will take some time. Be patient! Next, he told him how and why they pay a lot of attention to what the whale does correctly. Progress is constantly being noticed, acknowledged and rewarded. The more you pay attention to what people are doing right, the more that behavior will be repeated. Even if things aren't exactly right, praise progress, set them up for success and build from there, or accentuate the positive. And, when the whale doesn't perform his task correctly, they immediately redirect his behavior elsewhere. You have to focus on the behavior and not the person. When a good performance is followed by something positive, naturally people want to continue that behavior.
In Whale Done! Ken does an incredible job in showing how simplistic his concepts are, and how readily they can be applied both at work and at home.
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1.0 out of 5 stars Like Rusty Screws to the Eyes, Feb. 12 2004
By 
Kelly Hahn (Fort Wayne, IN) - See all my reviews
Here we go again; more canned material from Ken Blanchard that involves characters who are stale and annoying, advice that is common sense and recycled, and a catch phrase that would get anyone laughed out of their office. Whale Done! is a waste of time.
Here is my advice pertaining to Ken Blanchard books: Read The One Minute Manager if you feel insatiably curious about how a guy can write some 30 books with cheesy titles and make people think he's a leadership genius. Then, assume you've read all 29 other books. Because they're practially clones of each other.
I should get more specific; I'm sounding more mean-spirited than critical. For one thing, Blanchard's books average a retail price of $20. Now I know that nowadays you should never actually pay retail, but they're still expensive without merit. For another, with a size 20 font size, it takes more time for me to read "Elmo Bakes a Cake" to my seven month old son than it does to whisk through an entire Blanchard book while I'm on my coffee break. The scant material, supplemented by its triviality, comes nowhere close to justifying the cost.
And by the way, if you're so relationally inept that you think reading a Blanchard book on relationships is going to turn you into Mr. Congeniality, spend your money elsewhere. If, by the end of the book, you think people are going to champion your leadership because you say to them, "WHALE DONE!" you obviously assassinated the former executive to get where you are.
Finally, Blanchard's characters exist nowhere within the known world we call earth. The way his characters talk with each other is as unrealistic and shallow as a third-grade reader. Just reading the conclusion of the speech Wes' mentor gives in Whale Done made me long for something more intellectually stimulating...like Madamoiselle for Teens or Cadavers Today.
You could trip over a newspaper and get a better idea of reality than by reading Whale Done. Don't waste your time with this book. If you're going to read in hopes of improving your relationships with subordinates, actually read. Read something that requires a bit of heavy lifting like Kouzes and Posner's The Leadership Challenge. The only extra expense will involve your time. But if it came down to reading Whale Done and watching two hours of televangelism through static...
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5.0 out of 5 stars You too can build power and positive relationships., Dec 2 2003
Give yourself...or better yet your co-workers, family and friends a Whale Done.
Who would have thought that you could use whales as an example of how to make positive relationships, but leave it to Ken Blanchard, the master of the story to do it.
Whale Done is a great story with insightful application. It follows those concepts that they use at Sea World to train the Killer whales. The books uses an effective illustration of this training to teach you how to improve all your relationships that you have and to become more productive while your at it.
The Whale Done Approach is rather simple, but powerful. Build trust, accentuate the positive, and when mistakes occur, redirect the energy.
So how do you do this? Ken points out that you build trust by being sincere and honest. This is important because people know when you are not. You have to show people also that you mean no harm and you have to realize that building trust takes time. This is similar to the Emotional Bank account that Stephen Covey talks about in the 7 Habits. When you value the relationship by building trust you make deposits, but when you make a mistake or blunder you make a BIG withdrawal.
Accentuating the positive is done for a rather intriguing reason, as Ken points out, the more attention you pay to what someone is doing, whether it is right or wrong, the more that behavior will get repeated. So it is important to accentuate the positive to reinforce the positive behavior in others.
Redirecting energy requires several different parts. First and foremost, Ken indicates that you have to catch people doing things right rather than always finding what they are doing wrong. This way you encourage people to continue to do right things and help with the first part, building trust. Next when you are redirecting you have to remember to focus on the right behavior and not that the person is bad or unacceptable. If you want to redirect correctly, Ken sets out the steps that you need to take. First, describe the problem clearly and without blame. Next, show the negative impact that what they are doing will have. If, it is appropriate, take blame yourself. Next, make sure that the person knows what the correct task is and that they understand it. And finally, express your trust and confidence in them.
Ken does a masterful job of taking a power life changing concept and bringing it down to the easy to read level of child's story. It is a quite but powerful read. I highly recommend that you read about the whale and how they can help you change your life.
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4.0 out of 5 stars A Good Read!, Oct. 15 2003
By 
Rolf Dobelli "getAbstract" (Switzerland) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Ken Blanchard of One-Minute Manager fame draws on the positive training techniques that SeaWorld whale trainers use to get their whales to want to perform. Although using whale training as a teaching model is a unique twist on the literature about training and motivating employees, the material itself is not nearly as exotic. Much of it draws upon traditional principles for getting along with others, such as building trust, emphasizing the positive and redirecting undesired actions into more productive channels. If you've read Blanchard's previous book about being aware when people do something right so you can praise them, some of this content will seem familiar, though he says this is his "most important" book. The story line tracks mythical businessman Wes Kingley's discussions with whale trainers who reveal what they do to train their creatures, gradually, carefully and with real warmth. These conversations blow some very basic points up to whale-size, but Blanchard writes with charm. We recommend this splashy manual, the first course in Whale Psyc 101.
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3.0 out of 5 stars No harm done, March 28 2003
By 
Tapetum (Kentuckiana) - See all my reviews
If the first principle of medicine is: first do no harm, then Mr. Blanchard's book is at least primarily successful medicine. If you choose to read it, you will do no harm to yourself or your work or family relations. On the other hand, you're not likely to do a heck of a lot of good either. Mr. Blanchard is attempting in this book to explain the principles of positive training (or conditioning) without ever actually calling his methods by their right name, and indeed without accurately understanding them. Fortunately it's awfully hard to do real harm by telling people to be nice to each other.
However if you really want to understand the principles behind the method (or in other words, to know what the heck you're doing and why it works), try "Don't Shoot the Dog" by Karen Pryor instead. Rather than being a business manager who talked with a killer whale trainer, Ms. Pryor actually was a dolphin trainer, and will give you the real deal. Kindness is necessary, but so is attention, timing, and a whole slew of other stuff tht Mr. Blanchard never goes into. Dealing with kids, dealing with co-workers, dealing with subordinates, or even dealing with bosses, find out how people learn how to treat you, and how to teach them to do better. Just find out from a different book than "Whale Done"
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5.0 out of 5 stars Take a balanced approach., Dec 12 2002
By 
B.Sudhakar Shenoy (India) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Shamu, the giant killer whale is the hero of this story. He does incredible things at Seaworld and his trainer Yardley, ends up learning a lot from the whale on what makes the it perform. Les Kingsley , a disgusted manager, scoring low on managing people and performance, happens to be at Seaworld; and this changes his life at office and home forever, for the better.
The Management Consultant Marie Anne enters the scene to give a formal academic touch to the theory behind the exemplary performance and behavior of the killer whales. Most managers respond in two ways to their reports- No response when performance is good; Negative feedback when performance is not as per expectations. There are two other ways that could make substantial difference to the lives of people and high impact on performance enhancement - Redirecting negative behavior and positive response to anything that is done in the right direction. The whole emphasis is to shift feed back from " catching people doing things wrong" to "catching people doing things right". The focus is on establishing trust and a strong relationship with employees as a means to facilitate a channel to enhance the positive side of working towards common goals. Appreciation is given not on completion of the task to perfection, but at every effort and step that leads to it.
Ken Blanchard argues, as in many other works of his, against rating people as per the normal curve. He brings out a case to abolish performance management systems that compel managers to differentiate people and distribute them on a predetermined pattern. Personally, I am yet to come across substantial material and evidence to go by his argument. Managers are hired to perform, and in the process it is but natural that they would reward people who help attain business goals. This is not to say that people are to be treated as yet another set of physical assets purchased to produce goods and services. What is perhaps needed is a balanced approach that respects people as human beings and at the same time rewards them as per what they accomplish.
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4.0 out of 5 stars An interesting book!!, Sept. 15 2002
By 
"nicolemky" ((YIP Ming-kwan)student studying in Marketing Year 1, the City University of Hong Kong , HKSAR) - See all my reviews
In this book the author stressed the importance of ¡§building trust, accentuating the positive, and redirecting negative behavior¡ in order to speech up the effectiveness at work and at home or to improve our private life.
In fact, the truth, which both whales and people perform better when you accentuate the positive, is not a new finding. Animals such as birds, dogs and monkeys also perform better when you accentuate the positive.
But the authors used an interesting Heading ¡¥Whale Done! : The Power of Positive Relationships¡ for the book.I think, this¡s a good marketing strategy for promotion the book. At least when a shopper come to a book shop, seeing the title of the book, he/ she would like to have a quick look of the abstract of the book.
In addition I don¡t know if the ¡§ruff business manager and family man Wes Kingsley¡ is really an existing individual in the world or not. But I really admire him. He has such a creative thinking and reflective mind that he associated the techniques used by animals¡ trainers to the techniques used by a manager, compared this two sorts of techniques, and then made use of the result to improve his own management skills. Perhaps, being a student who studying in Marketing, I should learn to be also as creative and reflective as Wes Kingsley.
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4.0 out of 5 stars An interesting book!, Sept. 15 2002
By 
"nicolemky" ((YIP Ming-kwan)student studying in Marketing Year 1, the City University of Hong Kong , HKSAR) - See all my reviews
In this book the author stressed the importance of ¡§building trust, accentuating the positive, and redirecting negative behavior¡ in order to speech up the effectiveness at work and at home or to improve our private life.
In fact, the truth, which both whales and people perform better when you accentuate the positive, is not a new finding. Animals such as birds, dogs and monkeys also perform better when you accentuate the positive.
But the authors used an interesting Heading ¡¥Whale Done! : The Power of Positive Relationships¡ for the book.I think, this¡s a good marketing strategy for promotion the book. At least when a shopper come to a book shop, seeing the title of the book, he/ she would like to have a quick look of the abstract of the book.
In addition I don¡t know if the ¡§business manager and family man Wes Kingsley¡ is really an existing individual in the world or not. But I really admire him. He has such a creative thinking and reflective mind that he associated the techniques used by animals¡ trainers to the techniques used by a manager, compared this two sorts of techniques, and then made use of the result to improve his own management skills. Perhaps, being a student who studying in Marketing, I should learn to be also as creative and reflective as Wes Kingsley.
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Whale Done!: The Power of Positive Relationships
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