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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars The Virtuous Consumer
I think that many of us believe that we are doing our part to preserve our world for our children and grandchildren. We happily recycle what we can. We donate our old clothes to good will. We enjoy local foods and even buy organic sometimes.

The Virtuous Consumer shows the consumer that there is so much more that we could be doing. This book examines better...
Published on Oct. 7 2007 by Tami Brady

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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Guilt sucks; and so does this book
For a book with such a worthy ideal to be so bad in so many ways is really quite remarkable. First up; top marks for honesty. The author brags throughout about how she owns a huge house (32 windows, no less), drives a huge car (a minivan; her husband has the convertible), owns two enormous dogs and a swimming pool, so she barely bothers to conceal the immensity of her...
Published on Oct. 24 2008 by J Scott


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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars The Virtuous Consumer, Oct. 7 2007
By 
Tami Brady "Tami Brady: Transition-Empowermen... (Calgary, Canada) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: The Virtuous Consumer: Your Essential Shopping Guide for a Better, Kinder, Healthier World (Paperback)
I think that many of us believe that we are doing our part to preserve our world for our children and grandchildren. We happily recycle what we can. We donate our old clothes to good will. We enjoy local foods and even buy organic sometimes.

The Virtuous Consumer shows the consumer that there is so much more that we could be doing. This book examines better options in every single consumer category from food and clothing through energy consumption and pesticide free gardening to adopting a pet and buying a car. Reading this information for me was rather eye opening. I really hadn't thought about how my pads and tampons were adding to the landfills. I had never even considered that there might be other options. Likewise, I had never spent even a single moment thinking about the pesticides used to grow my cotton clothing, what my laminate flooring was really made of, or the chemical composition of my children's toys.

The Virtuous Consumer is an interesting read. I don't see myself following the author's guidelines to the letter or worrying about how every purchase I make effects the world. However, I did find a handful of things that I could conceivable do within my regular routine and a few new products that I'd like to check out. I am also armed with a little more information that will likely affect my buying practices and choices.
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Guilt sucks; and so does this book, Oct. 24 2008
This review is from: The Virtuous Consumer: Your Essential Shopping Guide for a Better, Kinder, Healthier World (Paperback)
For a book with such a worthy ideal to be so bad in so many ways is really quite remarkable. First up; top marks for honesty. The author brags throughout about how she owns a huge house (32 windows, no less), drives a huge car (a minivan; her husband has the convertible), owns two enormous dogs and a swimming pool, so she barely bothers to conceal the immensity of her gigantic eco-footprint. She may as well confess that this book is essentially a salve for the conscience of the conspicuous consumer. Sure, you can have all she has and still feel great - just don't weed your lawn, make sure to put out your recycling, eat organic food, avoid GMOs, and take your kids on bike rides occasionally! You're doing your bit, and as she says, guilt sucks - so why bother doing more?

What's perhaps worse than the cheery hypocrisy that drips from every page is just how wrong-headed and contradictory the book is. One page she's bemoaning animal testing, the next accusing the FDA of not testing enough (is she volunteering?). I could go on, but I also want to accuse her of being not just a lightweight on science but blissfully ignorant throughout. Here are some of her ridiculous claims: don't mix vinegar and bleach, or you'll make chloramine gas (no you won't). Barium is radioactive (not in the slightest; that's why they use it for internal imaging of humans). Burning one pound of fossil fuels makes 28 pounds of carbon dioxide gas (not even remotely close).

Ugh. Even if you're the type who consumes vast amounts of resources and feels slightly guilty about it, Garrett's book won't help you much. Her solutions are so superficial that you're probably doing them already.
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The Virtuous Consumer: Your Essential Shopping Guide for a Better, Kinder, Healthier World
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