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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Pedro Paramo
Short review - Amazing
Long review - I was very impressed with this book. The story - if it can be summed up so simply - is of a man who goes to the town where his father lived on the request of his deceased mother. He wanders about the dead town, running into the ghosts of previous residents, discussing his father with them and getting a glimpse into their...
Published on Feb. 18 2004 by Damian Kelleher

versus
1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Fellow "IB-ers"
This is by far the most confusing book I've ever read. Within the first paragraphs of the novel Rulfo grasps the reader's attention and pulls them into an unknown magical world...Comala. The never ending themes of ghosts, death, whispering, and love draw in a reader's every bit of imagination. After a first reading I was completely lost and most definitely would not feel...
Published on Feb. 4 2004 by Veronica


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5.0 out of 5 stars This book echoes ... Rulfo shows, not tells., Feb. 24 1998
By A Customer
This review is from: Pedro Paramo (Paperback)
I got lost with Pedro Paramo in this hauntingly surrealistic trek. This book echoes, it trickles down through time and you can hear the rain and the voices Pedro Paramo hears. The scattered, translucent images he creates come together at the end, upon reflection. A journey into a whole past that creates, shapes, and even destroys is often confusing and disjointed. Rulfo SHOWS that, not tells. Likewise, he invites us to look at our own lives and our own past.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Intriguing at first, Captivating after that., Nov. 14 1997
By 
Laurent Bremond (Paris, France) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Pedro Paramo (Paperback)
A must read for those who like experiencing the frontier between dreams, nightmares and reality.
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5.0 out of 5 stars The best mexican book, Nov. 8 1997
By A Customer
This review is from: Pedro Paramo (Paperback)
This book is incredible. You can watch interaction with LA DIVINA COMEDIA in many things about the way to the Hell(INFERNO in Pedro Páramo is Comala). Juan Rulfo was the best writer from Mexico who oly wrote two books, but of incredible quality. I'm mexican and I want to recomend this book. Because I think you can understand many things about mexican culture and the relation between mexican culture and the death. In my opinion the best book from Mexico. All coments are wellcome in my e-mail adress(Spanish, English, Portuguese and Italian)
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4.0 out of 5 stars An excellent, dynamic, and interesting book, Sept. 23 1997
This review is from: Pedro Paramo (Paperback)
More than point A to point B this aesthetically rich and thought provoking novelis wonderfully dark. A fascinating work that forces the reader to actively engage an intriguing and beautiful work.
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3.0 out of 5 stars surrealism...existentialism..., Dec 1 1996
By A Customer
This review is from: Pedro Paramo (Paperback)
It is not uncommon for people to laud that which they do
not understand -- a possible explanation for why this
peculiar work has been praised to the point of being referred
to as a masterpiece.

Pedro Paramo largely resembles a surrealistic painting
(think Salvador Dali or Max Ernst) in its dreamlike and
disjoint quality. The book is divided, not into chapters,
but into random scenes that do not correspond to any form of
chronological order. The author, Juan Rulfo, described these
scenes as being linked by silences in a state of "no-time"
in which life and death merge. The speaker is not always
identifiable, and, in some instances, it is difficult to
determine whether the character speaking is alive or dead.
This almost stream-of-conscious approach is both challenging
and intriguing, underscoring Rulfo's perspective of existence.

The message, however, is of questionable value. Admidst
the corruption of the church and the ruling landlord of the
town (the patron), the inhabitants are depicted as sin-filled
and helpless. In life, they endure the misery of both material
and spiritual poverty. In death, the soul wanders aimlessly,
without hope, while the body continues to exist, to think,
in a state of utter stagnation. Essentially, life is no
different from death, and each connotes a purgatory lacking
the elevating quality of hope.

Pedro Paramo = an interesting read from the stylistic
perspective, but with the additional baggage of an existential,
depressing view of life.
comments and/or criticisms welcome.
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars It's about the revolution, Feb. 19 2004
This review is from: Pedro Paramo (Paperback)
For those who are not getting Pedro Paramo, here it is- the book is about the Mexican Revolution. Pedro Paramo represents Porfirio Diaz, who controlled Mexico from 1870's to 1910, when the revolution broke. The death of Susanna is the call of the revolution when the populace decides to do what they want, not what PP dictates. The misery afterwards? The misery of the revolution.
Other recomended ready? The Labyrinth of solitude (Octavio Paz) and The Burning Plain (En Llano En Llamas- Juan Rulfo).
With the Revolution in mind, the book becomes much clearer.
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A must-read!, Oct. 13 2010
Yes, Pedro Paramo is a confusing piece and yes, it is not an easy read, despite the fact that it does not exceed 150 pages. So if you are looking for an easy read, don't go for Pedro Paramo.

I started reading it in Spanish because I like reading in the original language when I can. Many great books are lost in translation. It was not long before I switched to the French version thinking that I was not understanding because of the language barrier. I finished and many things remained unclear. I LOVED it though to the point that the next day, I started reading it in Spanish this time: everything fell in place.

Pedro Paramo is a concise amazing piece of literature. In my opinion, it is a reader's dream. A novel told with several narrative modes, with no chronological order to the events. A minimalism in the description. Yet, the book covers ALL the questions (about life, death, power, revolution, illusion, religion, deception and love) in very few words.

This is the work of a master. A must-read!

Note: Anything I would say about the storyline would be a spoiler in my opinion.
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PEDRO PARAMO
PEDRO PARAMO by JUAN RULFO (Paperback - Feb. 1 2009)
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