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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Thief!
Alfred Hitchcock made two kinds of movies: bone-chilling thrillers that looked into the dark side of human nature, and witty adventure stories.

"To Catch A Thief" is a sterling example of the latter kind of movie -- a chic, sleek, golden-tinted caper, full of witty dialogue and solid acting from legendary actors. Despite the taut action scenes, Hitchcock makes...
Published on Feb. 22 2007 by E. A Solinas

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3.0 out of 5 stars So-so Hitchcock jewel caper
As a connoisseur of Hitchcock's work, To Catch a Thief was merely adequate. Lacking any real suspense, the movie was held together by the excellent cinematography offered by the picturesque French Rivera locale.
Cary Grant was at his suave and debonair best as John Robie, a retired cat burgular who is suspected when a rash of jewel thefts plagues the swanky Riviera...
Published on Feb. 6 2004 by Cory D. Slipman


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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Thief!, Feb. 22 2007
By 
E. A Solinas "ea_solinas" (MD USA) - See all my reviews
(HALL OF FAME)    (TOP 50 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: To Catch a Thief (DVD)
Alfred Hitchcock made two kinds of movies: bone-chilling thrillers that looked into the dark side of human nature, and witty adventure stories.

"To Catch A Thief" is a sterling example of the latter kind of movie -- a chic, sleek, golden-tinted caper, full of witty dialogue and solid acting from legendary actors. Despite the taut action scenes, Hitchcock makes it feel almost like a cinematic vacation.

Paul Robie (Cary Grant) was "The Cat," the most notorious jewel thief in Europe, before he retired. But now impossible heists -- made in Robie's style -- are popping up all over Cannes, and he's the immediate suspect. Narrowly escaping the police, he enlists a friend to help him clear his name by capturing this new Cat.

To do that, he masquerades as an American tourist, and gets to know pretty oil heiress Frances Stevens (Grace Kelly) and her mother. But when the Stevens jewels are stolen, Frances brings the cops down on Robie -- and now he is more desperate than ever to find the Cat, because he suspects it's an old friend...

Hitchcock was in fine form with "To Catch a Thief," especially since he had two great actors in the mix. Granted this isn't one of his more insightful or suspenseful movies, but it captures a sense of sly wit and fun instead.

If "To Catch A Thief" has a problem, it's that astute viewers will be able to guess who the Cat is after about a half hour, maximum. But fortunately viewers can be distracted by Hitchcock's knack for razor-sharp dialogue ("What do you say?" "My only comment would be highly censorable") and double entendres (during an intimate lunch, Francie asks, "You want a leg or a breast?").

It's also gorgeous to behold -- he entire movie is bathed in the golden Riviera sun, with lots of swimming, fast car chases, elaborate costume balls, and ornate hotels. But Hitchcock winds it up with a genuinely tense rooftop chase, complete with wrestling and gunshots.

Grant is a bit grizzled (and VERY overtanned) here, but still dapper and charming enough for Robie, a thief with principles and a taste for the good life. Kelly is also quite good as an heiress who is less prim than she appears; John Williams and Jessie Royce Landis have fun supporting roles as a "veddy veddy English" insurance man and a shrewd rich woman.

"To Catch A Thief" is a warm, sumptuous piece of classic film, with great dialogue and even better acting. Fun, stylish little mystery
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Paramount does up the "Thief" just right!, Dec 26 2009
By 
Robert Badgley (St Thomas,Ontario,Canada) - See all my reviews
(TOP 500 REVIEWER)   
The 1955 Hitchcock drama/thriller "To Catch a Thief" gets the high hat treatment as part of Paramount's two disc Centennial collection of movies.
The movie filmed in Vistavision(Hitchcock's first in this format)stars the suave,debonair and very much tanned Cary Grant and the soon to be real Princess of Monaco,looking stunning I might add,Grace Kelly.All outside footage was shot on the French Riviera in and around the Nice area...and beautiful is the scenery we see throughout.
The film concerns itself with a famous pre-WW2 thief by the name of John Robie(Grant).During the war he was part of the Maquis and became quite famous for his heroic exploits with them.After the war he went legit and is living a contented life in a wonderful villa over looking the Mediterranean until some 15 years later when another thief starts to pick up where Robie left off;copying Robie's style to a tee.
The local constabulary of course suspect him right away.When they come a-knocking Robie leads them on a wild goose chase and for the first while stays barely a step ahead of them.He seeks out an ex-Maquis friend named Bertani who runs a restaurant and who offers his assistance.However his staff,who are also all ex freedom fighters,view Robie as persona non grata,think he's guilty and want no part of him.
Bertani hooks him up with the local Lloyd's of London agent(John Williams) who is the insurer for many of the victim's of the thefts.Robie figures the best person to catch the thief is himself as no one would know the thief's next moves better.The agent supplies him with a list of individuals and their insured property so Robie can get a better handle on what and who might be next.
The police eventually catch Robie but release him on a short leash,so they think,in order for him to prove his innocence.Robie meets up with a rich American widower Jessie Stevens(Jessie Landis)and her daughter Francie(Kelly).It is inevitable that Kelly falls hard for Grant's charms but Francie knows from the start who he really is.She is a headstrong girl and won't take no to helping Robie play out his scheme.She gets him invited to a masquerade ball and it is at that event that Grant finally manages to get his man,er crook.Through a lonely vigil on the roof,while the police think he's on the grounds dancing with Francie(it is really the Lloyd's of London man in disguise),he finally comes face to face with the real thief and in the end catches and exonerates himself.The film ends with Grant and Kelly in a passionate embrace.....ahh,viva la romance!
The film,though not a great film,is still very enjoyable throughout and typical Hitchcock.(Watch for his cameo a short way into the film on a bus-Grant looks at him,then out the bus window to a fade out).It has a lot of plot twists and visual turns that keep you guessing throughout.The scenery in the film is just wonderful and is almost a travelogue in itself.It is of no coincidence that the film was shot where it was.This was a favourite spot for the Hitchcock clan to vacation at and Kelly herself about a year later would become the reigning queen of the principality of Monaco in this very region.
I would give the film itself four stars but in the technical department and with the features supplied in this set,I have added another star to give it full marks.The picture has been remastered wonderfully(as have all the films in this series)and the colours are crisp and rich looking.The second disc of this set contains a real bonanza of riches.Here are some of the things included:A short bio of Hitchcock,a short film on the censorship code prevelant during the /50s,a short on the writing and casting of the film,a short on the making of the film,a short look at its' two main stars,an "appreciative" look at the film,a short on costumer Edith Head,the trailer,several still galleries and an interactive map of the the French Riviera and the actual spots at which the film was shot.I think you will agree this is a stunning array of extras which makes overall for an even more enjoyable experience.
In conclusion,the film gets a solid four stars and the extras contained therein push it all the way to the max.An intriguing and interesting plot keeps one guessing throughout the films run.With this restored print the scenery is shown at its' magnificent best,as are its' cast and two main stars Cary Grant and Grace Kelly.This is the only way "To Catch a Thief".
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Super film, un grand classique, Dec 24 2012
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Il faut voir et revoir ce beau film de Hitchcock! Magniques Grant et Kelly dans le sud de la France.
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5.0 out of 5 stars The thief has finally been captured on an incredible DVD!!, Oct. 22 2009
By 
Stephen Pletko "Uncle Stevie" (London, Ontario, Canada) - See all my reviews
(TOP 50 REVIEWER)   
XXXXX

"Is it true, or just a rumour--that John Robie, a former cat burglar of Paris before the war [World War II], is once again on the prowl? Fashionable resorts on the Riviera are being regularly looted by a skilful jewel thief. Robie, once a hero in the French Resistance Army, was said to have reformed--however, the style of this new crime wave is certainly his."

The above is a close-up of a newspaper article found in this movie that happens to explain its entire premise. John Robie (Cary Grant), nicknamed "The Cat," is thought to be on the prowl again after a lengthy absence. Problem is he hasn't "stolen a piece of jewellery in 15 years."

Robie's self-chosen mission: to catch this imitator, this copy-cat. In order to do this, he "unofficially" gets the aid of an insurance agent (John Williams) and a rich, widower (Jessie Royce Landis) & her daughter (Grace Kelly).
Along the way, Robie becomes romantically involved with the daughter.

This movie (a romantic thriller) is based on the novel "To Catch a Thief" (1952) by David Dodge. It was directed by the "master of suspense," Alfred Hitchcock. It would be Grace Kelly's third and final film for Hitchcock (as she was to become a real princess shortly after).

This movie is filled with witty dialogue. Here's an example just after some jewels have again been stolen on the French Riviera and the thief is again thought to be John Robie by a French woman Robie is talking to:

French woman: "Last night you steal a small fortune, and today you lie on the beach with an American beauty [the rich widower`s daughter]."

Robie: "Well, that's why one needs a small fortune."

The acting is fantastic with Grant Cary (whose birth name was Archie Leach) being debonair, charismatic, and charming. Grace Kelly (being 25 years younger than Grant) holds her own with Grant. Despite the age difference, there was a definite chemistry between Grant and Kelly that comes through on the screen. I also liked the performances by John Williams and Jessie Royce Landis. (Note that by the end of this movie, it seems that Robie (as played by Grant) might become the son-in-law of the rich widower (as played by Landis). Landis was only seven years older than Grant.)

There are also some French actors that appear in this movie. Many seem to be uncomfortable speaking English. There is one exception though. The French actress (Brigitte Auber), whose character (she's the French woman alluded to in the witty dialogue above) is integral to the plot, gives a good performance. (This was a rare occurrence for her to be appearing in an English movie.)

Look for Hitchcock's customary cameo which appears at about nine minutes into the movie.

The cinematography is in a word--magnificent. You can't go wrong when you have the French Riviera (known as the Cote D'Azur in France) in the background. The colour of this movie is beautiful. It was filmed in VistaVision. If you have a large widescreen television to view this movie, then you're in for an incredible experience, (I also envy you.)

The DVD itself (the "Centennial Edition" released in 2009) is perfect in picture and sound quality. Altogether there are eleven interesting extras.

You might be interested to know that there was a television series in the mid-1960s entitles "T.H.E. Cat."

Finally, my only problem concerns the disc's English subtitles. There is some French spoken in the movie. Now the French actors do a good job through there movements and expressions of conveying what is said. However, I would have appreciated that their spoken French be translated by the English subtitles. (Note that the first words Cary Grant speaks are in French.)

In conclusion, there are movies that are said to be "classics." Watch this movie to see for yourself why it is a true classic!!

(1955; 1 hr, 45 min; 18 scenes; 2 discs; widescreen)

<<Stephen Pletko, London, Ontario, Canada>>

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5.0 out of 5 stars To catch a break, June 5 2009
By 
E. A Solinas "ea_solinas" (MD USA) - See all my reviews
(HALL OF FAME)    (TOP 50 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: To Catch a Thief (Bilingual) (DVD)
Alfred Hitchcock made two kinds of movies: bone-chilling thrillers that looked into the dark side of human nature, and witty adventure stories.

"To Catch A Thief" is a sterling example of the latter kind of movie -- a chic, sleek, golden-tinted caper, full of witty dialogue and solid acting from legendary actors. Despite the taut action scenes, Hitchcock makes it feel almost like a cinematic vacation.

Paul Robie (Cary Grant) was "The Cat," the most notorious jewel thief in Europe, before he retired. But now impossible heists -- made in Robie's style -- are popping up all over Cannes, and he's the immediate suspect. Narrowly escaping the police, he enlists a friend to help him clear his name by capturing this new Cat.

To do that, he masquerades as an American tourist, and gets to know pretty oil heiress Frances Stevens (Grace Kelly) and her mother. But when the Stevens jewels are stolen, Frances brings the cops down on Robie -- and now he is more desperate than ever to find the Cat, because he suspects it's an old friend...

Hitchcock was in fine form with "To Catch a Thief," especially since he had two great actors in the mix. Granted this isn't one of his more insightful or suspenseful movies, but it captures a sense of sly wit and fun instead.

If "To Catch A Thief" has a problem, it's that astute viewers will be able to guess who the Cat is after about a half hour, maximum. But fortunately viewers can be distracted by Hitchcock's knack for razor-sharp dialogue ("What do you say?" "My only comment would be highly censorable") and double entendres (during an intimate lunch, Francie asks, "You want a leg or a breast?").

It's also gorgeous to behold -- he entire movie is bathed in the golden Riviera sun, with lots of swimming, fast car chases, elaborate costume balls, and ornate hotels. But Hitchcock winds it up with a genuinely tense rooftop chase, complete with wrestling and gunshots.

Grant is a bit grizzled (and VERY overtanned) here, but still dapper and charming enough for Robie, a thief with principles and a taste for the good life. Kelly is also quite good as an heiress who is less prim than she appears; John Williams and Jessie Royce Landis have fun supporting roles as a "veddy veddy English" insurance man and a shrewd rich woman.

"To Catch A Thief" is a warm, sumptuous piece of classic film, with great dialogue and even better acting. Fun, stylish little mystery.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Thief and thief, Jan. 31 2007
By 
E. A Solinas "ea_solinas" (MD USA) - See all my reviews
(HALL OF FAME)    (TOP 50 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: To Catch a Thief (Bilingual) (DVD)
Alfred Hitchcock made two kinds of movies: bone-chilling thrillers that looked into the dark side of human nature, and witty adventure stories.

"To Catch A Thief" is a sterling example of the latter kind of movie -- a chic, sleek, golden-tinted caper, full of witty dialogue and solid acting from legendary actors. Despite the taut action scenes, Hitchcock makes it feel almost like a cinematic vacation.

Paul Robie (Cary Grant) was "The Cat," the most notorious jewel thief in Europe, before he retired. But now impossible heists -- made in Robie's style -- are popping up all over Cannes, and he's the immediate suspect. Narrowly escaping the police, he enlists a friend to help him clear his name by capturing this new Cat.

To do that, he masquerades as an American tourist, and gets to know pretty oil heiress Frances Stevens (Grace Kelly) and her mother. But when the Stevens jewels are stolen, Frances brings the cops down on Robie -- and now he is more desperate than ever to find the Cat, because he suspects it's an old friend...

Hitchcock was in fine form with "To Catch a Thief," especially since he had two great actors in the mix. Granted this isn't one of his more insightful or suspenseful movies, but it captures a sense of sly wit and fun instead.

If "To Catch A Thief" has a problem, it's that astute viewers will be able to guess who the Cat is after about a half hour, maximum. But fortunately viewers can be distracted by Hitchcock's knack for razor-sharp dialogue ("What do you say?" "My only comment would be highly censorable") and double entendres (during an intimate lunch, Francie asks, "You want a leg or a breast?").

It's also gorgeous to behold -- he entire movie is bathed in the golden Riviera sun, with lots of swimming, fast car chases, elaborate costume balls, and ornate hotels. But Hitchcock winds it up with a genuinely tense rooftop chase, complete with wrestling and gunshots.

Grant is a bit grizzled (and VERY overtanned) here, but still dapper and charming enough for Robie, a thief with principles and a taste for the good life. Kelly is also quite good as an heiress who is less prim than she appears; John Williams and Jessie Royce Landis have fun supporting roles as a "veddy veddy English" insurance man and a shrewd rich woman.

"To Catch A Thief" is a warm, sumptuous piece of classic film, with great dialogue and even better acting. Fun, stylish little mystery
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5.0 out of 5 stars It takes a thief to catch a thief, Nov. 23 2006
By 
bernie "xyzzy" (Arlington, Texas) - See all my reviews
(TOP 100 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: To Catch a Thief (Bilingual) (DVD)
Years ago John Robie (Cary Grant) decided that it was better to live rich than poor. So he became a joule thief. He was pretty good at his trade. His ability and modus operandi of sneaking along roof tops gave him the title of "The Cat". However he a war came up and he was an iatrical art of the resistance. This and the promise to give up his thieving ways allowed him to go free and enjoy the proceeds from his ill-gotten ways.

Well it looks like "The Cat" has stuck again. Robie can only clear himself by finding the "Copy Cat." To help he enlists some old friends, an insurance investigator, and some new friends/or maybe victims.

So did he really do it and trying to blame it on someone else?

Why would anyone after all these years want to frame him?

This movie can become a favorite as even when you know the outcome you will watch it again for the action and interaction of the different characters. Then you will also look for clues that are now obvious but missed the first time.
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4.0 out of 5 stars With Class and Grace, July 16 2004
By 
T. Lobascio (New Jersey United States) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: To Catch a Thief (Bilingual) (DVD)
To Catch A Thief marks a departure for director Alfred Hitchcock. Here, he sheds the moniker as The Master Of Suspense, going more for romance and comedy--rather than any of his well known plot twists or thrills. The film may not be the best of his career, but thanks to a strong leading man and a radiant leading lady the movie still works.
John Robie, (Cary Grant) is a reformed cat burglar, out to prove himself innocent of a recent crime spree. As he tries to capture the thief who's terrifying the French Riviera, he attracts the attention of the lovely Frances Stevens (Grace Kelly), a wealthy and spoiled American traveling the Riviera with her widowed mother (Jessie Royce Landis). However, things do not begin on a romantic note. Robie is more interested in clearing his name than in pursuing the beautiful American, but the two will not go their separate ways so easily. When Mrs. Stevens has her jewels stolen, the snubbed Frances puts the police on Robie's trail. Now the dashing Robie will have to win the confidence and assistance of Frances if he is to ever set things right.
Grant and Kelly light up the screen together, with an entrancing chemistry that sparkles, especially in the impromptu ad-libbed dialogue of the picnic scene. A series of elaborate set pieces combined with the spectacularc Riviera scenery make the film an enduring piece of American cinema. Hitchcock lets his leads pick up for any of the film's lack of excitement, that traditionally peppers the director's films. I have always had a "crush" on the late Grace Kelly, and this film just helps to solidify those feelings.
The DVD contains three well produced making of featurettes. "Writing and Casting," "The Making of To Catch a Thief," and "Alfred Hitchcock and To Catch a Thief", will give you a well rounded look at the film. But things would have worked out even better if these were edited together as one larger whole. Long time Hitchcock collaborator, costumer Edith Head, is highlighted in a fourth featurette, that also tops off the disc's bonus material.
To Catch A Thief is recommended for any Hitchcock fan..
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3.0 out of 5 stars So-so Hitchcock jewel caper, Feb. 6 2004
By 
Cory D. Slipman (Rockville Centre, N.Y.) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: To Catch a Thief (Bilingual) (DVD)
As a connoisseur of Hitchcock's work, To Catch a Thief was merely adequate. Lacking any real suspense, the movie was held together by the excellent cinematography offered by the picturesque French Rivera locale.
Cary Grant was at his suave and debonair best as John Robie, a retired cat burgular who is suspected when a rash of jewel thefts plagues the swanky Riviera. Realizing, he must apprehend the actual thief, whose m.o. parallels his own, he plots a scheme.
Grace Kelly, whose acting ability does not rival her beauty, plays a perfectly typecasted role for her. As a spoiled, bored, rich socialite Frances Stevens, she and her wealthy but earthy mother, played exceptionally well by Jessie Royce Landis are vacationing. The elder Mrs. Stevens has a valuable collection of jewelery that Grant theorizes would make excellent bait.
Hitchcocks creates a predictable plot, with the usual love affair. There is however, little in the way of mystery or tension or even chemistry between Kelly and Grant to make this flick anything more than mediocre. Edith Head provides a high point with her fantastic wardrobes created for the costume ball scene.
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5.0 out of 5 stars The Shakespeare of Cinema Strikes Again, Jan. 15 2004
By 
Dorion Sagan (East Coast, USA and Toronto) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: To Catch a Thief (Bilingual) (DVD)
This is a great movie with wonderful performances by a handsome Cary Grant and a stunning Grace Kelly, who plays a witty young American (she's not playing!). That Kelly thinks of settling in Monaco in the film and later became the real Princess of Monaco makes one suspect that she wanted to make permanent the sort of life she acted in this brilliant psychological thriller. The theme of thievery is subtly parsed by hitchcock, who alludes to its erotic overtones and who, in general, is operating, like Shakespeare on a double level: you can enjoy it on the level of action and drama, and yet there is much more than meets the eye as jewels, money, possession, playing hard (and easy) to get, and the thrill of the chase are all mirrored in the register of romance. The cut to fireworks over the water outside the window as Grace wears fake diamonds but makes real love may have laid the way for the greatest cinematic cliche, but here it is far more than that: the shimmering water, shining eyes, crackling fireworks, and sparkling theme of beauty's temporary nature contrasted with desire's undying love come together perfectly. Like Shakespeare, Hitchcock's works seem infinitely rich and nuanced. A great, subtly deep romance from the master (watch for him on the bus early on) of film.
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