Customer Reviews


85 Reviews
5 star:
 (52)
4 star:
 (12)
3 star:
 (8)
2 star:
 (8)
1 star:
 (5)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favourable review
The most helpful critical review


5.0 out of 5 stars Before "Fear of Fours"
If you are interested in Lamb, be sure to give this CD a listen. I was introduced to Lamb via "Fear of Fours," but this debut is far more intricate. But, by all means, buy them both, but if you can (or will) buy only one Lamb CD, this should be it. "Fear of Fours" is better as a second course, since the evolution of a pair using live instruments,...
Published on April 12 2002

versus
3.0 out of 5 stars not worth the hype, but not bad.
The first time I heard b-line off of Lamb's "Fear of Fours" cd, I was hooked (if you haven't seen the video for b-line I would do whatever it takes to do so). "Fear of Fours" was one the best albums I bought in 2000 and when I downloaded "Gorecki" I assumed "Lamb" would be a major contender for my personal album of the year...
Published on Jan. 25 2002 by wowbagger


‹ Previous | 1 29 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

5.0 out of 5 stars Before "Fear of Fours", April 12 2002
By A Customer
This review is from: Lamb (Audio CD)
If you are interested in Lamb, be sure to give this CD a listen. I was introduced to Lamb via "Fear of Fours," but this debut is far more intricate. But, by all means, buy them both, but if you can (or will) buy only one Lamb CD, this should be it. "Fear of Fours" is better as a second course, since the evolution of a pair using live instruments, that's right--cello, drums, etc., for trip-hop purposes is enough to warrant a long listen.
The evolution of the group becomes quite clear when one compares first tracks on "Lamb" and "Fear of Fours." "Lamb's" opening track is nothing short of amazing ("Lusty" for the uninitiated). The quick-break beat will amaze you and make you wish the accelerator in your car would go just a little bit further down, but, to think that this track will merely aid in teenage angst and accrual of speeding tickets is a misnomer, it fits just as well playing low in a room fit for long conversations or mutually-consenting adult acrobatics.
A great album. It should be the first "Lamb" to grace your shelves.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


3.0 out of 5 stars not worth the hype, but not bad., Jan. 25 2002
By 
This review is from: Lamb (Audio CD)
The first time I heard b-line off of Lamb's "Fear of Fours" cd, I was hooked (if you haven't seen the video for b-line I would do whatever it takes to do so). "Fear of Fours" was one the best albums I bought in 2000 and when I downloaded "Gorecki" I assumed "Lamb" would be a major contender for my personal album of the year. Goreki is indeed beautiful, it starts of slow and you know something big is on the horizon and you wish that it would hurry up and get there, but it culminates and by the time it hits full throttle, you wish it would have taken longer to develop. Goreki may very well make song of the year, but as far as the rest of the album goes, I feel it lacks the fusion that "Fear of Fours" contains. What I mean by that is that I've hear some reviews say "F of F" is a competition between vocalist Lou Rhodes and mixer Andy Barlow. Lamb's sophomore effort was more refined than their debut and they blended together perfectly on. On "Lamb" however, I found myself a little uncomfortable. I was waiting for Andy and Lou to get in sync, especially on ''Cottonwool". Barlow started off intriguing, but then arbitrarily broke off into an electronic version of a garage band jam session, while Lou is resonating an emotion plea of warmth and closness. They somewhat miss the mark again on "Trans Fatty Acids". As Barlow produces smooth, deep, and mature pulses (this time), Lou ackwardly tries to fit the "to whether the rain..." chorus into Andy's miasma. Much of the album is like these two examples. Every song starts off well-and may be very good throughout MOST of the song. Barlow goes just a tad bit overboard in places and Lou tries to squeeze lyrics into a couple of songs (esp "Gold"). For the most part though, "Lamb" is a good debut. I was really impressed with "God Bless", because it has the patience and timing that "Gorecki" has. "Merge" was another favorite. The trademarks of Lamb are what makes "Lamb" and "F of F" worthy of obtaining like Lou's darting range and Lambs frequent use of the double bass.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars Amazing. Unlike anything out there., Dec 27 2001
By 
C. H Soto "sharky_321" (South America) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Lamb (Audio CD)
The magic of this album resides perhaps in the nature of the band members itself. While Andy Barlow craves all types of beats and such Louise Rohdes is more into the lyrical and the "esthetic" aspect of the music. Such different approaches are certainly bound to create conflict (and they've come close to split up several times) but the result of the mixture of such different approaches is absolutely amazing.
For instance, the first time that you listen to "Cotton wool" is a pretty weird experience. While the music seems to be taken out of a Goldie album the vocals and lyrics belong to a much more mellow band. But somehow, and after listening to it several times, you find that the song really works. However and contrary to what most people think I don't think that this is the strongest track in the album (which speaks about it's quality as the song is superb. "Cotton wool" certainly defines the band but I find, for instance, "God bless" (which I'm listening at the moment) to be much more rewarding. And of course there's the absolutely beautiful "Gorecki" with some of the most beautiful lyrics I've ever listened to.
Overall the album is a great mix of drum n bass with a bit of jazz, some trip hop and a beautiful voice. A mix that shouldn't work in theory but it somehow does. Something unlike anything out there. And with this statement I call out to all those who have tried to label them as Portishead copies to pay more attention. Though at first glance there might be several similarities (mainly due to Lou's voice being somewhat similar to Beth Gibbons' voice) but further listening will reveal that they're quite different and there are very few similarities apart from both being superb bands.
So, bottom line. Buy this album. Superb, one of my favorites without a doubt. If I die and go to heaven this is surely one of the albums I would like to take with me.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars Breathtaking, July 9 2001
By 
"jendewitt" (Seattle, WA United States) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Lamb (Audio CD)
Let me start off by saying that Lamb is the best band EVER. Out of the 2,000+ cd's that I own, this one is STILL the most frequently played, and I have had it for three years. Lamb is a complete anomaly. This band offers the interesting combination of Louise Rhodes deeply introspective and tangible vocals, with the choppy percussion and innovative programming of Andy Barlow. You might think that this combination would yield complete sonic chaos, but it does quite the opposite. The marriage of Lou's dreamy vocals to Andy's complex compositions takes the listener on a spiritual journey. The cd opens with "Lusty", which is a very intriguing track. "Lusty" features sparse melodic stabs, a hard percussive backing, and Louise cooing "only you can soothe me, come cool me down..." With that, Louise perfectly conveys the heart and soul of a person in love. And love really IS the theme of this album. "God Bless" features jazzy basslines, seductive beats, and orchestral instruments. It is quite beautiful. "Cottonwool" is perhaps the most breathtaking song I have ever heard. The song is made up of various loops and breakbeats combined with dreamy atmospheric sounds. The effect is eerily beautiful. This coupled with Louise's incredibly profound and soulful lyrics makes "Cottonwool" one of Lamb's best songs. "Transfatty Acid" features weird distortion (it sounds like Lou is singing through a can) and a strange buzzing/electricity type aura. This song makes you feel like you are in another world. "Transfatty Acid" is extremely innovative and the musical effect is mindnumbing. "Zero" is sweet and mellow. It features acoustic guitar and strings and the effect is very powerful. Lou's singing is especially good on this track. "Merge" is strange in that it does not feature Louise's vocals. But it is not a weak track by any means. This track feels like an interlude of sorts, but it is a very refreshing one. This track has a surging bass line which is overlayed with sharp, brassy horns. Then the beats come in fast and feverish, and this song builds into one hell of a climax. This song is exhilerating, to say the least. "Gold" is rather jazzy. It features, what sounds like, an upright bass, combined with sweeping drums, and a marimba(?). It is mellow and soothing, especially following "Merge". "Closer" is the only track that I would deem to be filler, but it is still quite good. It is jazzy, like "Gold" but this has the hard percussive beats that some of the earlier tracks had. "Gorecki" is the heart and soul of this album. This is the best song ever written! In fact, a sliver of it was sung in the new movie "Moulin Rouge" by Nicole Kidman's character Satine. "Gorecki" has the most heartfelt, emotional, honest, passionate lyrics ever written. Louise sings this song so endearingly, that it honestly brings tears to my eyes. This song is a delight musically, as well. It is subdued at first, with soft percussion, and a dreamy, relaxed aura. As the lyrics grow more intense, so does the melody, and the very end of this song absolutely soars. It takes the listener to another plane of existence. It is nothing short of breathtaking, and if you listen to no other song on this album...listen to "Gorecki"! "Feela" is kind of like an experimental, musical trip to a confessional booth. It's as if Louise is singing this song to herself, and the music is very minimal. I equate this song to Madonna's wonderful (but comparatively less inspired) "Mer Girl" on Ray of Light. Now for a word of caution: Do NOT turn off the cd once it goes quiet, or else you will miss the hidden track, which is a remix of "Cottonwool". It is a great remix, too. Definitely worth waiting for! So, basically I recommend that you BUY THIS CD IMMEDIATELY! I think it is the best cd ever recorded, and this is coming from a girl who also happens to be a musician, and the proud owner of over 2,000 cd's. This cd is gold. Trust me.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars Touching..., Nov. 4 2000
By 
funktion (The Synaptic Gap) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Lamb (Audio CD)
Louise Rhodes' acrobatic little-girl-lost voice and Lamb's sparse background atmospheres dare you to make the inevitable Portishead comparison. It's a mean and dirty trick, though. Scratch the surface and you'll find that Rhodes and instrumental maestro Andrew Barlow have little in common with Bristol's noir-chic contingent. LAMB carves out a strange space for the Manchester duo between the hectic breakbeat bluster of drum n' bass and the jazz-and-blues-inflected chamber folk of Joni Mitchell and John Martyn. Lamb's points of reference are strange but wonderful. Rhodes' delivery combines the traits of a torch singer, an R&B siren, and an acoustic singer/songwriter into a ravishing and complex vocal identity. The very Mitchell-esque "Zero" shivers, bare and beatific, within a minimalist arrangement of cello and electronics. Bounding basslines wrap "God Bless" in the lithe contours of jazz. Vibes serve the same purpose on the frosty "Gold," while blazing trumpet insinuations graze "Closer" and "Merge." Postmodern Classical titan Henryk Gorecki is cited and name-checked in Lamb's staggeringly beautiful extrapolation of the composer's SYMPHONY, NO. 3, OP 36. "Lusty," "Closer," and "Cotton Wool" provide the hyperkinetic drum n' bass rudiments that Fila Brazillia's superlative remix of the latter (an unlisted bonus track) inflates a thousand-fold.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


3.0 out of 5 stars The music is engaging, but the vocals are strictly average., March 5 2000
By 
This review is from: Lamb (Audio CD)
I found this album to be a great disappointment. Several critics awarded it with great review and I thought, like many others, "Hey. This might be worth buying." The trip-hop genre has much to offer, and many exceptional artists have emerged from it's core. Portishead, Massive Attack and Tricky come to mind immediately. They each show wonderful talent in this new and engaging genre. Lamb, however, falls short with their debut. The music is compelling and it keeps the artist interested, yet when Rhode's voice flows in, it loses much of the impact. Her vocals are strictly average and aren't really anything to drool over. There are a few worthy tracks, however, that shine through the rest of the blandness here. Songs like "Lusty," "Zero," and "Gorecki" are somewhat worthy, yet songs like "Cotton Wool," which was an supposedly an incredible song is nothing but annoying, boring and the consistent change of beats throws the listener off track - and he changes the track number. It is the background music here that is to love, yet it is smothered by the "not-so-tender" voice of Rhodes. Songs like "Gold," "God Bless," and "Trans-Fatty Acid" come to mind right away. The beats and the music are something to admire for they are complex and the melodies are very catchy, but the lyrics brought about by Rhodes degrade the music and make it strictly average.
Lamb does offer some good songs, however, just not here. "B-Line" off their new album features a new and refined Rhodes and her lyrics are more sensual and grasping. Her voice also shines through and is not scratchy and "annoying" as it is here. The music, as before, is still captivating as well. For true entertainment from Lamb, indulge in "Fear of Fours." Their debut will only disappoint.
Grade: C
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars About time people started to appreciate!, Feb. 15 2000
By 
"chunsa" (Stuck in Florida) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Lamb (Audio CD)
I was first introduced to Lamb back in 1998. This is an AMAZING cd. I only wish they had a little more recognition. Nonetheless, I absolutely cannot get enough of LAMB! It is quite rare for me to like every track on a cd, but with Lamb, I can keep the cd running without passing a song. I was more of a hip hop lover and at first I had my doubts about the cd but after hearing the first track I was hooked. Each track is amazing but my two favorites would be the haunting song GOREKI and GOD BLESS. Lamb is just something different that came in my life when music became so boring and lackluster. Their second album Fear of Fours was a little different but it holds its own. (I prefer the first cd over the second. BUY THIS CD! You will not regret it. A pointer for those reluctant buyers -at first if the music sounds a little different, keep listening with reckless abandon and then you will be HOOKED! =) If you do infact enjoy Lamb, then check out OLIVE (it's a little more calm but oh so nice) and BREAK BEATS-ULTRA OBSCENE. You won't regret it!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1.0 out of 5 stars Stick with Morcheeba, Portishead, Hooverphonic, etc., Dec 20 1999
This review is from: Lamb (Audio CD)
One of the cool things about the internet is you can get so much information about bands you might not have heard otherwise. Lamb is the first band that I became aware of solely because of the internet. I noted that when I checked out discs from Morcheeba, Hooverphonic and some other bands I like on Amazon, that Lamb always seemed to come up in the "Customers who bought this title also bought:" section. Thinking that I'd probably also share similar musical tastes with those other "customers", I bought this disc before hearing any of the tunes. In theory, I think this is a sound way of buying new music...it just failed miserably for me in this case. Let's run down what Louise Rhodes (vocals) and Andrew Barlow (drum, bass, electronica) have created here. There are practically no melodies to be found anywhere on this disc. The drums and bass start and stop randomly. Even when there is a consistent rhythm underpinning, Rhodes vocals are bland and predictably monotone. The only song I'd recommend for your personal collection is on in which Rhodes doesn't sing (#6 Merge). If you're looking for girl longingly singing over atmospheric textures and chunky bass and drums, you'd do much better with Morcheeba, Portishead, Mono, or Hooverphonic.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars Great debut, distinct from Portishead, Mono, Morcheeba..., Feb. 4 2000
By 
M. Domingo (the other side of night, California) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Lamb (Audio CD)
I had only learned to appreciate this album as an afterthought than when it was first released. When I had first heard it, I was used to listening to some very straight-forward 4/4 house, techno and rave-influenced tracks. But it was only when I started discovering drum & bass and break beat styles did I start to look for this release. And when I finally listened to it, and seriously absorbed it, I realized it was none of those things. It had similarities and elements to bands that would be considered trip hop, but they had some nice, unexpectedly syncopated rhythms, very, VERY jazzy progressions, and Louise Rhodes' vocals were of a different style of vocalization than I was used to. These guys are in a group all by themselves and hold themselves up well. But I'm not gonna say that they're better or worse than Portishead, Mono, Morcheeba, Girl Eats Boy or any other similar band because they're JUST that...SIMILAR.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars Musically different amongst other drum & bass bands, Oct. 21 1999
By A Customer
This review is from: Lamb (Audio CD)
Great album...Have to admit, didn't like it at first, too different for me at the time. Found it a year later, LOVED it, I have recommended it to at least 10 of my friends. Other break-beat/drum & bass bands rely only on loops and samples, but if you saw these guys live, you'd eat your shorts! I saw them support their more recent "Fear of Fours" album, and they rock! Andy does double-duty with keyboards/sound modules and turntables, while Louise has a great voice and stage presence. Melodically and structurally, their music is not common, which is nice. Several of their songs constantly change meter, and they don't seem to be stuck in the same rut that other bands are: the same damned rhythm/melody for every single one of their songs! I can't wait for Lamb to come back to the SF Bay Area in February, and it seemed like they loved Bimbo's 365 Club as well.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


‹ Previous | 1 29 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

This product

Lamb
Lamb by Lamb (Audio CD - 1996)
Click for more info
Usually ships in 1 to 2 months
Add to cart Add to wishlist
Only search this product's reviews