Customer Reviews


200 Reviews
5 star:
 (168)
4 star:
 (19)
3 star:
 (6)
2 star:
 (4)
1 star:
 (3)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favourable review
The most helpful critical review


3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Rush's arguable finest hour
Canadian power trio Rush's ninth(and eighth studio overall) album entitled Moving Pictures was released in February of 1981 to fans whom were heavily anticipating a strong follow-up to the previous year's Permanent Waves, which was Rush's first Top 5 album here in the US thanks to songs like Freewill and The Spirit of Radio. When fans first went to the stores to buy MP,...
Published on July 7 2004 by Terrence J Reardon

versus
3.0 out of 5 stars A Good Followup to Permanent Waves
I know this is Rush's biggest selling album and most popular. So what! At the time of its release, I just thought it was a good followup to Waves. 22 years later, my opinion hasn't changed. All the Rush heads I knew at the time felt the same way. PERMANENT WAVES BLEW US AWAY!! It took a good 2 years to digest Waves and about that time, Signals was released, so I guess I...
Published on Feb. 2 2003 by Lance


‹ Previous | 1 220 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Rush's arguable finest hour, July 7 2004
By 
Terrence J Reardon "Classic rock guru" (Lake Worth, Florida, USA) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Moving Pictures (Audio CD)
Canadian power trio Rush's ninth(and eighth studio overall) album entitled Moving Pictures was released in February of 1981 to fans whom were heavily anticipating a strong follow-up to the previous year's Permanent Waves, which was Rush's first Top 5 album here in the US thanks to songs like Freewill and The Spirit of Radio. When fans first went to the stores to buy MP, the artwork must have caught some eyes. The title of the disc Moving Pictures had monumental multiple meanings. First, there is workers actually "moving pictures". Then, there are people crying because the pictures are so moving. Finally, there was a film crew making a moving picture of the whole scene on the back cover. Plus, actual moving pictures of the band at their respective instruments(on the original CD, drummer Neil Peart's photo was missing, luckily on this remaster, his photo was restored). Also, Bob Ludwig(whom originally mastered the album), did a superb job on the remastering of this remastered version. All of the songs on Moving Pictures were written by all three Rush members except*(with Pye Dubois) and +(by Geddy Lee/Peart). The album starts at full throttle with Tom Sawyer*, which was talking about modern-day heroes and using one of Mark Twain's character as a metaphor and featured rapid playing by Peart, guitarist Alex Lifeson and bassist/vocalist/keyboardist Lee, whom was singing more and more in a lower octave on this album than previous albums. The song Red Barchetta follows, and is about a person who goes to his uncle's farm and discovers a car. The music picks you up then accelerates as the song goes on and then ends as it began by dropping you off at the next location. Next is YYZ+, an instrumental named after the luggage tag code at Toronto airport. That track was used as the focal point for Neil's drum solo in concert off and on for the next nine years after this track came out. The first half ends with Limelight, which was more of Neil's song about his problems dealing with fame and was more sensitive than Alex or Geddy were in dealing with autograph hounds and stalkers and was a Top 100 hit in 1981. The second half kicks off with the 11 minute epic The Camera Eye, which was the last 10 plus minute suite Rush ever recorded and is a classic and is split in two parts. First, we're in modern day New York and then we go back to ancient times London and featured excellent guitar work by Alex and synth and bass work by Geddy. Next is Witch Hunt, which was the third part of a four-part saga called Fear and is about dealing with prejudices and injustices in the world. Interesting fact, the mob rants at the start of the track was actually multi-tracked rants and raves of the three Rush members whom were acting hyper after drinking bottles of Scotch outside of the studio(Le Studio in Morin Heights, Quebec, Canada) and it was cold outside(below freezing) and the band were drinking and bellowing to create that rant effect. Plus, the song had album Rush album cover guru Hugh Syme on synthesizers and two drum tracks by Neil to create a synth drum sound years ahead of its time. The album concludes with Vital Signs, which would not have sounded out of place on a Police album and is a great track. Moving Pictures was an instant smash peaking at #3 on the Billboard album charts and selling over 4 million copies in the US alone making it Rush's biggest seller. Today, this album still sounds fresh and hasn't aged at all. This album belongs up there with The Dark Side of the Moon, Who's Next, Hotel California, Back in Black, Appetite For Destruction, A Night at the Opera and Sgt. Pepper. A classic!!!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Moving Pictures(4.5), July 4 2004
This review is from: Moving Pictures (Audio CD)
This album is seen as one of, if not RUsh's best album and also as the transition between their first few CDs (which were more hard/prog rockish) and their more experimental future albums. Much of the praise that this album gets is well deserved as many of Rush's classics come from this album.
Since this is a Rush album, the excellent musicianship is obviously present. Neil Peart's drumming is amazing on this album as he creates complex rhythms and navigates the band's irregular time signatures with ease. Peart's lyrics are also interesting and thought provoking in some cases. Alex Lifeson's guitar playing is also top notch. He lays down some great solos and some classic riffs like the one in "Limelight". The final member of the group, Geddy Lee is also amazing on bass. He creates many great basslines (as usual) like the one in the instrumental "YYZ". He lays out some nice synthesizer parts too. His high pitched acquired taste vocals could take away from the album for some but I think they fit the music fine. They are more tolerable than those on some previoius albums which were even more high pitched.
1. Tom Sawyer: This is the most popular song off this album. It deals with independence and individuality. I really like the bass parts and the drums in this song. The song is quite catchy. Definitely one of my favorites off this album. Classic Rush. 10/10
2. Red Barchetta: This 6 minute song is also one of my favorites. The lyrics are about a future society/govt. that bans the use of cars. The character in the story is going joy riding in his Uncle's hidden car. The music is very good as are the lyrics. I like the vocal melodies as well. Great song 9.5/10
3. YYZ: This instrumental starts out with Peart tapping out morse code on his cymbal. The song then moves into a dissonant section before transitioning into its main melody. The extremely cathcy bass lines are really superb in this song. They pretty much dominate the much of song before the guitar solo. There are many mini bass and drum solos throughout the songs as well. Extremely catchy. Another favorite and Rush classic. 10/10
4. Limelight: Another amazing song. The lyrics are about fame. The opening guitar riff is superb and is extremely catchy. Probably the best on the album. I like the vocal melodies a lot too. ANother one of the big hits from this album. 10/10
5. The Camera Eye: This song is the first not so good song on the album. It is about 11 minutes long. I definitely did not give this song much of a chance and I should listen to it again. I just don't care for really long epics so much unless i find them really interesting. I think some of the guitar parts were catchy. The lyrics are about New York and London possibly. 7/10
6.Witch Hunt: Pretty good song. There is a sample of some sort of mob. Next is a nice synthesizer part that I think they got a guest to do. The music is dark as are the lyrics. The song is part of the "Fear" trilogy. Neil Peart said in an interview that it was about how fear leads to mob mentality. The lyrics are quite cautionary. It is semi political and seems left leaning. Not one of the best songs but still pretty good. Good lyrics. 8/10
Vital Signs: I didn't like this one. Sounds a bit reggaeish. I didn't really appreciate this one. It's OK. 5/10
Overall, I reccomend this album. The first half is really top notch but the last three songs were a bit less compelling. I give this five stars more or less because the first 4 songs were so good.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars The finest hour arguably for Rush, May 13 2004
By 
Terrence J. Reardon (South Carolina and Mass., USA) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Moving Pictures (Audio CD)
Canadian power trio Rush's ninth(and eighth studio) album Moving Pictures was released in February of 1981 to fans whom were anticipating a strong follow-up to the previous year's Permanent Waves, which was Rush's first Top 5 album in the States thanks to songs like "Freewill" and "The Spirit of Radio". When fans first went to the stores to buy MP, the cover must have caught some eyes. The title of the disc Moving Pictures had monumental meanings. First, there is workers actually "moving pictures". Then, there are people crying because the pictures are so moving. Finally, there was a film crew making a moving picture of the whole scene on the back cover. Plus, actual moving pictures of the band at their respective instruments(on the original CD, drummer Neil Peart's photo was missing, luckily on the remaster, his photo was restored). Also, Bob Ludwig(whom originally mastered the album), did a superb job on the remastering of this remaster. All of the songs on Moving Pictures were written by all three Rush members except*(with Pye Dubois) and +(by Geddy Lee/Peart). The album starts at full throttle with Tom Sawyer*, which was talking about modern-day heroes and using one of Mark Twain's character as a metaphor and featured rapid playing by Peart, guitarist Alex Lifeson and bassist/vocalist/keyboardist Lee, whom was singing more and more in a lower octave on this album than previous albums. The song Red Barchetta follows, and is about a person who goes to his uncle's farm and discovers a car. The music picks you up then accelerates as the song goes on and then ends as it began by dropping you off at the next location. Next is YYZ+, an instrumental named after the luggage tag code at Toronto airport. That track was used as the focal point for Neil's drum solo in concert off and on for the next nine years after this track came out. The first side concludes with Limelight, which was more of Neil's song about his problems dealing with fame and was more sensitive than Alex or Geddy were in dealing with autograph hounds and stalkers. Side two kicked off with the 11 minute epic The Camera Eye, which was the last 10 plus minute suite Rush ever did and is a classic and is set first in modern day New York then goes back to ancient times London and featured excellent guitar work by Alex and synth and bass work by Geddy. Next is Witch Hunt, which was the third part of a four-part saga called Fear and is about dealing with prejudices and injustices in the world. Interesting fact, the mob rants at the start of the track was actually multi-tracked rants and raves of the three Rush members whom were acting hyper after drinking bottles of Scotch outside of the studio and it was cold outside and the band were drinking and bellowing to create that rant effect. Plus, the song had album cover guru Hugh Syme on synthesizers and two drum tracks by Neil. The album concludes with Vital Signs, which would not have sounded out of place on a Police album and is a great track. Moving Pictures was an instant smash peaking at #3 on the Billboard album charts and selling over 4 million copies in the US alone. Today, this album still sounds fresh and hasn't aged at all. This album belongs up there with The Dark Side of the Moon, Who's Next, Hotel California, A Night at the Opera and Sgt. Pepper. A classic!!!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars 'Confident their ways are best', March 19 2004
By 
N. P. Stathoulopoulos "nick9155" (Brooklyn, NY) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Moving Pictures (Audio CD)
This rightfully deserves its reputation as a top Rush album, if not the best effort in a sizeable catalogue.
Moving Pictures falls square in between the hard, progressive rock of their 70s concept albums and their later alternative sound with its embrace of synthesizers. There are synths, but they're worked in to accent the music here. With Signals, the 1982 followup, Rush would take on a more layered, synth-heavy sound where Alex Lifeson's guitar would serve more as color work, or even disappear into the mix later in the decade.
This album is concise, and the vinyl was programmed perfectly. With only seven tracks, there is no weakness here, and the first side features one famed piece after another. Side one opens with perhaps the band's most famous single, Tom Sawyer. The synth sound accents the hard riffs in this cynical ode to rebellion and individualism. Red Barchetta is a total fan favorite and live staple about a young man's weekly tradition of racing his uncle's old hot rod. YYZ is a funky instrumental that is also a live staple and instantly recognizable with its ride cymbal opening. Then Limelight brings it home with its deep, fat riffs in a song about the concept of fame (hence the title.)
The old second side is more cerebral, I think. Camera Eye is an 10+ minute epic, the last of its kind for the band. The music is phenomenol--this doesn't feel as long as it really is. Part of that is due to the structure of the song--it's split into two considerations of 'the city'. First it's New York, then London, talking about the hustle and bustle and the lives people have in these crowded spaces. The track is contemplative rock, highlighted by warm synths and excellent riffing. Then comes Witch Hunt, a superb track. It opens dark and menacing, the sounds of a colonial witch hunt (locals ranting and raving with imagery of pitchforks and torches) over an eerie synth. The song is monstrous--it opens up with Geddy's wailing and more synths, and Neil Peart's ridiculous fills. The whole album comes to a close with the tense but controlled Vital Signs, featuring more effective synth work, more contemplative lyrics.
Rush has always been a thinking man's rock group, going beyond the call of duty of rock to provide something of substance in a mass market field. They don't churn out tired love songs or whining odes to the misery of life. And how many groups can get away with lines like 'faces are twisted and grotesque'? Rush never makes the top of the charts, they don't make many videos, they don't live like decadent rock stars (though the guitarist had a particularly rock-star New Year's Eve incident turn ugly), they don't create controversy to mask a lack of talent, they don't resort to tricks or gimmicks.
The Rush remasters are very welcome, though the more valuable releases are the earlier ones that were recorded in analog. (Rush actually started going to digital recording pretty early.) It's interesting to listen to the new and then the old, and compare how the mix has changed. The traditionally crisp sound of the band is enhanced with the remasters and is clearer than ever. You can usually find them a bit cheaper than most new retail discs, though you may want to pick and choose your favorite Rush albums to upgrade.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars The Efficacy of Moving Pictures, March 13 2004
By 
James F. Colobus (Pittsburgh, PA United States) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Moving Pictures (Audio CD)
Band class was never my forte and yet for some reason I stuck with it throughout my secondary school years. My high school band director, Mr. Shapiro, actually once urged me to "play quietly" at an important band competition in Florida. Sure that comment hurt my feelings, but it would have taken more than that to get me to drop out of the three bands to which I proudly belonged: concert, marching, and jazz. Heck, sophomore year Mr. Shapiro actually insisted four of his least talented musicians (including me, of course) spend second period of the entire year in a small room away from the rest of the class, a scarring experience I previously detailed in my review of Iron Maiden's Somewhere In Time cd. If that banishment didn't humiliate me into quitting the band, believe me, nothing could.
Besides, there was one other alto sax player in the band, Topper, who was almost as bad as me. A glutton for punishment, Mr. Shapiro often forced Topper and me to engage in saxophone duels over second-to-last (5th) chair, much to the chagrin of our classmates. The 3rd and 4th chairs of John and Courtney were way beyond our reach, even after Courtney abandoned her saxophone practice habits and Rush fixation to embark on a period of rampant promiscuity that challenged the efficacy of even the most potent birth control pills.
One individual who regularly put contraceptive regimes to the test but never abandoned his Rush fixation, however, was Mike, by far the best sax player and arguably the finest musician in the band. Mike had a stranglehold on first-chair that his chief rival, Jeff, harbored no illusions of ever usurping. Jeff was good, but Mike clearly was special. And it wasn't just on the sax that Mike worked his magic, a fact he made apparent to us every time Mr. Shapiro took a sick day.
On the days Mr. Shapiro spent convalescing at home, we were expected to practice during band class as though he was actually present. In reality, however, as soon as class began, someone would usually end up putting a Van Halen or Rush album on the band room stereo system. Eventually, a collective urge to emulate our heroes would strike us. The stereo would be abruptly turned off and someone would start jamming. Desperate to shed my musical loser label, I'd venture over to the keyboards where I was far more competent than on saxophone and start cranking out the intro to "Jump" or "I'll Wait". There'd be this brief moment where everyone would begin to rethink their opinion of me until Terry, our fantastic tinted-glasses wearing drummer, would come in on the skins and I'd start screwing up the tempo. That would be about the time Mike would saunter over, brush me aside, and take over playing those keyboard riffs flawlessly.
As much as everyone enjoyed hearing Mike play Van Halen songs, he'd soon be inundated with requests for the song that we all loved to hear him play, "Red Barchetta". Rumor had it that Mike could play the keyboard parts for every song on Rush's already legendary Moving Pictures album, but the crowd primarily wanted to hear "Red Barchetta" so unfortunately that rumor remains unsubstantiated to this day.
As always, Mike and Terry blazed their way through a torrid version of "Red Barchetta" and I returned to being regarded as a musical loser. I can't even imagine what my classmates would have thought of my musical skills had Geddy Lee, Neil Peart and Alex Lifeson been in our band class. Competing with Mike was bad enough but can you imagine having to compete with those three as well? Most people, including Courtney in her pre-puberty incarnation, regard the Moving Pictures album as Geddy, Neil, and Alex's artistic zenith and I've yet to encounter any evidence that contradicts that position. The playing on Moving Pictures is dizzyingly spectacular and the song-writing is top notch and shockingly traditional relative to Rush's usual more progressive fare. The album includes my personal favorite Rush song (would you believe, "Red Barchetta"?) as well as the greatest rock music instrumental I have ever heard ("YYZ"). Mention the latter to my friend Chris, circa 1986, and he'd have offered you a 5-minute monologue on its myriad merits. Then, of course, you've got the two radio mega-hits, "Tom Sawyer" and "Limelight" whose awesome power have been somewhat sanitized due to years of radio saturation. Side 2 features classic Rush deep cuts like "The Camera Eye" and "Vital Signs". Moving Pictures is the one Rush album that every rock fan MUST have in his or her collection.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars A great album (what more need be said...), Feb. 19 2004
By 
William Grother (Robbinsville, New Jersey United States) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Moving Pictures (Audio CD)
A lot of people go into raptures over "Moving Pictures" and why not -- it is without a doubt the most complete Rush album and if you were going to own only one album of their music, you could certainly not do much better (save for a live album).
It encompasses the gamut of the band's persona, musically and lyrically. We all know "Tom Sawyer" as a modern rock anthem, "Limelight" as a peek into the world up on the stage, and "YYZ" as the ultimate power rock instrumental. We take another science-fictional journey in "Red Barchetta" and get in touch with our world through "The Camera Eye" and "Witch Hunt". "Vital Signs" is my favorite Ruch tune (and I was so glad the live board bootleg of it ends "Live in Rio") for its message and its rich sound.
Rather than continue the effusive praise which others have done more adequately than I can, let me just say that "Moving Pictures" bring us as close to heart of this band as any of their works. You see it in Neil's writing, Alex's virtuoso axework, and Geddy's driving base-line. This album personifies the trio's interconnectedness and the fusion that is created when they come together as Rush. Each is among the most talented at his instrument; Neil I think gets the most credit as the excellent drummer he is, but Geddy is one of the best bassists of all time and Alex takes to the guitar work with a passion that belies technical excellence. When they unite, the result is astonishing, and nowhere is that more true than in this album.
Enough boosterism... do yourself a favor... pick up this album, put on a good set of headphones, and feel the power for yourself...
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars A compact masterpiece after too many good albums !, Feb. 9 2004
This review is from: Moving Pictures (Audio CD)
In 1981 Rush had thousands of fans all over the world and had recorded at least 3 excellent and definitive albums in rock'n roll history. They're song had evolved extraordinary well in the previous years and, from album to album, we could see a great band of great musicians growing and reaching a very high level between the masters of rock. In the last 3 albums the band started using some synthesizers, instrument that became a mania in the 80's. This additional instrument bring some new colors and textures to the band's songs, featuring the obvious evolution of Neil Peart's lyrics and the development of Geddy Lee's vocals technique. The band performance at this time was just impecable ! So, after the big success of "The spirit of radio" and "Freewill" the band reached radio audiences and spread they're exciting hard-progressive rock among many teenagers and adults hungry for complex but still accessible rock. "Moving Pictures" summarized all these things and is, undoubtly, Rush finest moment in all these years. The album has a strong production, with a very clean sound. Each instrument is perfectly audible. The tracks are shorten, even very well played. Compared to the previous albums, the songs have a pop-oriented appeal, but what we really see are eight tracks of pure and energetic hard rock mixed with synthesized-progressive pop ! The definition may sound strange, but you will understand everything at the first listen to the first track: "Tom Sawyer", the major hit of the band. A compact song featuring dense futuristic lyrics, strong drumming, bass and guitar. Each instrument show some incredible virtuosism in just 4 minutes and a half! A classic. "Red Barchetta" is a delightful hard rock. You can see yourself driving faster trough the country road, reaching the skies, feeling the air in you hair... Excellent lyrics, excellent performance. Another major hit! "YYZ" is Rush's second best instrumental track ever (the big one is "La villa strangiato"). A hard progressive track with some high quality drumming and riffs. Lee, Lifeson and Peart are perfect! The synthesizer used in the middle of the track bring us a futuristic mood that really rocks! "Limelight" is another major hit. Like "Red Barchetta", a track to shake our heads and sing all night long. Strong musicianship and lyrics. The guitar solo is heavenly well played! (and are even better live!). These four tracks are among best Rush's tracks of all times ! "Camera eye" is the last lenghty Rush track in their career. Ten minutes and a half of synth-progressive rock that works very well. "Witch Hunt" is a dark track, with an interesting rhythm section. Short and misterious. I like it very much! "Vital signs" closes the album with a reggae-like rhythm and some The Police influence. This closing number exactly points to what Rush would do in the next albums. "Moving Pictures" was a big success at the time of its release and continous to be a major rock'n roll album after all these years. An obligatory album in any kind of popular music collection ! Not as pop as everything they did between 84 and 91, not as hard as in the early years. A perfect balance between virtuosism, complexity and accesibility . That's Rush !
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars RUSH'S MOST POPULAR ALBUM, Jan. 12 2004
This review is from: Moving Pictures (Audio CD)
It's instructive to know that Moving Pictures is Rush's largest-selling album, and has produced the most familiar radio hits, with Permanent Waves being a close second. Therefore, both of these albums are a no-brainer for any Rush fan's collection.
However, if you are new to Rush, Moving Pictures is not necessarily the first album I would recommend. Instead, I suggest starting off your musical journey with albums whose music is closest to your own preferences. Here are some rough suggestions:
Hard Rock - Fly By Night, 2112
Progressive Rock - A Farewell to Kings, Hemispheres
Techno/New Wave - Signals, Grace Under Pressure, Power Windows
Grunge - Counterparts
Alternative - Vapor Trails.
After that, you should move chronologically through their entire catalog (includig all live albums), starting with their first album. Following this procedure should get you hooked on Rush's music more quickly. Moreover, it will give you a much better perspective of and appreciation for the true breadth and enormity of Rush's music.
Happy listening!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars "Everybody got to deviate from the norm", Jan. 11 2004
By 
D. Knouse (vancouver, washington United States) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Moving Pictures (Audio CD)
I was looking over the list of songs here and it is incredibly obvious that this CD holds some of the greatest music I have ever experienced. This is a true masterpiece. I know that word is thrown around, even by me, but this time the moniker fits perfectly. "Tom Sawyer" and "Red Barchetta" are both perfectly arranged and performed with musical virtuosity gleaming in each measure. "YYZ" is a fine instrumental that is exceptionally written prog-rock with a stellar production sheen. "Limelight" was my personal favorite of theirs for a long time and still ranks highly in both musicianship and master lyricism. The first time I heard "Witch Hunt" I thought it was the most frightening song ever recorded (I was 11-years-old, what do you want?); and "Vital Signs" has some more dazzling lyrics and infectious, ableit fairly simple, lead guitar. The only down-point I might consider analyzing is "The Camera Eye," which is lenghty but not necessarily progressive. Still, it isn't filler. Besides, the remaining songs are so overwhelmingly astounding, I don't mind a little mediocrity. This is a masterpiece, to be sure.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars Timing Is Everything, Jan. 6 2004
By A Customer
This review is from: Moving Pictures (Audio CD)
Life changes occur every 7 years. By age fourteen, my life was under assault. I was in a new city and a new school. High school was intimidating, and my study skills were lousy. On top of that, my parents had split up, puberty was raging, and I was unprepared to deal with women, family, school, fights, adults, and authority. I was getting into small-scale troubles like shoplifting. My self-esteem was shot, exacerbated by pimples and the standard teasing. It was 1982.
Into this social and personal morass came "Tom Sawyer", the first rock single I ever paid attention to and the most important. Being black, I was used to R&B/soul/funk. Now I realize that the uninformed, uninitiated listener can find much about Rush to criticize, but to me, "Tom Sawyer" was a clarion call and a rallying cry. By the 3rd time I heard it on the radio, I had to buy the album (remember those?). When I was able to collect enough money (about $8.00 - remember that?), I went to the record store and was transfixed by the cool looking cover. I didn't get the depth of the cover concept - the "moving pictures" inside joke, but the surface appealed. Notice the gothic architecture, the recutrring theme of 3, the Clockwork Orange-looking men moving pictures, the burning witch, the black/red satanic lettering, and the 'bad seed-looking' little girls with their parents? Rush were the master manipulators here - luring teens in to ponder what evil lurks underneath, while affirming the teen desire to rebel, to piss off your folks, thereby reclaiming your desire for power. Then you turn it around and it's literally and figuratively the reverse - no evil intents, just a film shoot - a motion pic shoot. It's still one of the all-time greatest album covers for me.
Then the inner sleeve offers those oh-so-cool pose pix of them in motion laying down some of the wickedest and hardest music in rock. I was held captive to the stereo system with the first track, "Tom Sawyer". Another reviewer questioned why it was first on the album. He may as well ask why a the door to a building is on the first floor. It literally is a song intended for an audience like me then. Figuratively, it became the soundtrack for my teenage life. It suggests a dark, aloof cynicism, and a preternatural desire to avoid conformity. It has a sound that is singular, distinct, and unique. The middle keyboard part that morphs into that intense jam is like a drug trip. There is an obvious love of technical proficience, a holdout for artistic quality, and a very masculine love for gadgetry and technology. It tows the line between European lyricism and the African hypnotic beat. It also was complete - the images, words, rhythms, ideas all were dynamic and interplaying, and justified the high art of production. And it covered a wide spectrum of sound - the puglistic punches and the shimmering, brassy crashes of the percussion. That impossible-to-duplicate fat, distorted bass sound. I still marvel at Geddy's vocal performance on this record. Lifeson's solos in "Tom Sawyer", "Red Barchetta", and "Limelight" are classic, yet all of his work is incredible here. His effects are equally incredible - the digital delay ending his solo in "Limelight", and his dead-on 'shrieking tires' starting his solo in 'Barchetta'. That's one of those moments that make your arm hairs stand up. It's one of many moments on this album where you realize you're listening to true artists who have thought long and hard on how to manipulate our senses for a desired effect.
Then there's that feeling that you are a witness to the recording (just what are they whispering to each other before the solo of "Camera Eye?"). Read the credits and you'll note the album was recorded digitally - in fact they're probably the FIRST to do it - 4-5 years before CDs became the norm. And that production had a strangeness to it - a haunting sense of light and shade, like an Ansel Adams photograph.
Rush were a breath of fresh air for me. I wanted to be a part of the cool trip they were on then. I began to teach myself the drums, and I proceeded to collect every one of their albums and I studied them like a monk studying the New Testament. In 2 years I began to master Peart's power, and subsequently I discovered the Police, Zep, Iron Maiden, Yes, Ozzy, etc. I became a rock student and a musician, dabbling with the bass and the guitar.
So thank you, Rush. This album was the raft on the Mississippi for me. I was Huck and I was Jim, and the drumsticks were my paddles.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


‹ Previous | 1 220 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

This product

Moving Pictures
Moving Pictures by Rush (Audio CD - 1997)
Add to cart Add to wishlist
Only search this product's reviews