Customer Reviews


197 Reviews
5 star:
 (166)
4 star:
 (18)
3 star:
 (6)
2 star:
 (4)
1 star:
 (3)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favourable review
The most helpful critical review


3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Rush's arguable finest hour
Canadian power trio Rush's ninth(and eighth studio overall) album entitled Moving Pictures was released in February of 1981 to fans whom were heavily anticipating a strong follow-up to the previous year's Permanent Waves, which was Rush's first Top 5 album here in the US thanks to songs like Freewill and The Spirit of Radio. When fans first went to the stores to buy MP,...
Published on July 7 2004 by Terrence J Reardon

versus
2.0 out of 5 stars Hollow and Lifeless
Fellow musicians may admire their radiant technical abilities but, to most of us, Geddy Lee, Neil Peart and Alex Lifeson, better known as Rush, make a pretty hideous combination. Not only are Mr. Lee's high-pitched vocals capable of startling every canine within a five mile-radiance of his revolting shriek, but his lyrics are some of the most pretentious, ridiculous and...
Published on March 22 2002 by P. Nicholas Keppler


‹ Previous | 1 220 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Rush's arguable finest hour, July 7 2004
By 
Terrence J Reardon "Classic rock guru" (Lake Worth, Florida, USA) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Moving Pictures (Audio CD)
Canadian power trio Rush's ninth(and eighth studio overall) album entitled Moving Pictures was released in February of 1981 to fans whom were heavily anticipating a strong follow-up to the previous year's Permanent Waves, which was Rush's first Top 5 album here in the US thanks to songs like Freewill and The Spirit of Radio. When fans first went to the stores to buy MP, the artwork must have caught some eyes. The title of the disc Moving Pictures had monumental multiple meanings. First, there is workers actually "moving pictures". Then, there are people crying because the pictures are so moving. Finally, there was a film crew making a moving picture of the whole scene on the back cover. Plus, actual moving pictures of the band at their respective instruments(on the original CD, drummer Neil Peart's photo was missing, luckily on this remaster, his photo was restored). Also, Bob Ludwig(whom originally mastered the album), did a superb job on the remastering of this remastered version. All of the songs on Moving Pictures were written by all three Rush members except*(with Pye Dubois) and +(by Geddy Lee/Peart). The album starts at full throttle with Tom Sawyer*, which was talking about modern-day heroes and using one of Mark Twain's character as a metaphor and featured rapid playing by Peart, guitarist Alex Lifeson and bassist/vocalist/keyboardist Lee, whom was singing more and more in a lower octave on this album than previous albums. The song Red Barchetta follows, and is about a person who goes to his uncle's farm and discovers a car. The music picks you up then accelerates as the song goes on and then ends as it began by dropping you off at the next location. Next is YYZ+, an instrumental named after the luggage tag code at Toronto airport. That track was used as the focal point for Neil's drum solo in concert off and on for the next nine years after this track came out. The first half ends with Limelight, which was more of Neil's song about his problems dealing with fame and was more sensitive than Alex or Geddy were in dealing with autograph hounds and stalkers and was a Top 100 hit in 1981. The second half kicks off with the 11 minute epic The Camera Eye, which was the last 10 plus minute suite Rush ever recorded and is a classic and is split in two parts. First, we're in modern day New York and then we go back to ancient times London and featured excellent guitar work by Alex and synth and bass work by Geddy. Next is Witch Hunt, which was the third part of a four-part saga called Fear and is about dealing with prejudices and injustices in the world. Interesting fact, the mob rants at the start of the track was actually multi-tracked rants and raves of the three Rush members whom were acting hyper after drinking bottles of Scotch outside of the studio(Le Studio in Morin Heights, Quebec, Canada) and it was cold outside(below freezing) and the band were drinking and bellowing to create that rant effect. Plus, the song had album Rush album cover guru Hugh Syme on synthesizers and two drum tracks by Neil to create a synth drum sound years ahead of its time. The album concludes with Vital Signs, which would not have sounded out of place on a Police album and is a great track. Moving Pictures was an instant smash peaking at #3 on the Billboard album charts and selling over 4 million copies in the US alone making it Rush's biggest seller. Today, this album still sounds fresh and hasn't aged at all. This album belongs up there with The Dark Side of the Moon, Who's Next, Hotel California, Back in Black, Appetite For Destruction, A Night at the Opera and Sgt. Pepper. A classic!!!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars Man is this gooooood, Feb. 13 2014
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
The sound will blow you away. If you are a fan don't hesitate just buy this you won't be disappointed.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars great memories..., Dec 24 2013
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
i very love this bluray/cd pkg... great sound ! lots of great memories
the price was great too...
i recommend it
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars Great album just got better!, April 5 2013
By 
Mr. Jody Rice - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
It's just like your it the studio with Rush! the clarity of the sound is amazing! I Love this album on BD audio I just wish the record companies would embrace the BD audio format and put everything out in this format! BD audio blows away the audio cd, mp3, flac files, every format that came before it. It's a shame that the record companies won't embrace this incredible format because some like myself still like to buy music!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars Rush's best work, Dec 19 2012
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: Moving Pictures (Audio CD)
Tune after tune on this album rock. Liner notes show the band's fun side and Canadian nature (really? Thanking the Montreal Canadiens and Steve Shutt?). Simply awesome
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars moving pictures, May 21 2004
This review is from: Moving Pictures (Audio CD)
This is a great album from start to finish. Although I find myself listening to "Tom Sawyer" and "Limelight" less since they are placed ad infinitum on my local classic rock station. But the good thing is I can get more into the less popular tracks. All the songs on this album have been performed live. The Camera Eye is the only one not to be released live. Hopefully now with RUSH IN RIO and Rush breaking their tradition of a live album after every four studion album they'll be releasing some performances from the vaults. Anyway, before I read someone else's review I was not aware that Camera Eye was over ten minutes long, it didn't feel that long.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars The finest hour arguably for Rush, May 13 2004
By 
Terrence J. Reardon (South Carolina and Mass., USA) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Moving Pictures (Audio CD)
Canadian power trio Rush's ninth(and eighth studio) album Moving Pictures was released in February of 1981 to fans whom were anticipating a strong follow-up to the previous year's Permanent Waves, which was Rush's first Top 5 album in the States thanks to songs like "Freewill" and "The Spirit of Radio". When fans first went to the stores to buy MP, the cover must have caught some eyes. The title of the disc Moving Pictures had monumental meanings. First, there is workers actually "moving pictures". Then, there are people crying because the pictures are so moving. Finally, there was a film crew making a moving picture of the whole scene on the back cover. Plus, actual moving pictures of the band at their respective instruments(on the original CD, drummer Neil Peart's photo was missing, luckily on the remaster, his photo was restored). Also, Bob Ludwig(whom originally mastered the album), did a superb job on the remastering of this remaster. All of the songs on Moving Pictures were written by all three Rush members except*(with Pye Dubois) and +(by Geddy Lee/Peart). The album starts at full throttle with Tom Sawyer*, which was talking about modern-day heroes and using one of Mark Twain's character as a metaphor and featured rapid playing by Peart, guitarist Alex Lifeson and bassist/vocalist/keyboardist Lee, whom was singing more and more in a lower octave on this album than previous albums. The song Red Barchetta follows, and is about a person who goes to his uncle's farm and discovers a car. The music picks you up then accelerates as the song goes on and then ends as it began by dropping you off at the next location. Next is YYZ+, an instrumental named after the luggage tag code at Toronto airport. That track was used as the focal point for Neil's drum solo in concert off and on for the next nine years after this track came out. The first side concludes with Limelight, which was more of Neil's song about his problems dealing with fame and was more sensitive than Alex or Geddy were in dealing with autograph hounds and stalkers. Side two kicked off with the 11 minute epic The Camera Eye, which was the last 10 plus minute suite Rush ever did and is a classic and is set first in modern day New York then goes back to ancient times London and featured excellent guitar work by Alex and synth and bass work by Geddy. Next is Witch Hunt, which was the third part of a four-part saga called Fear and is about dealing with prejudices and injustices in the world. Interesting fact, the mob rants at the start of the track was actually multi-tracked rants and raves of the three Rush members whom were acting hyper after drinking bottles of Scotch outside of the studio and it was cold outside and the band were drinking and bellowing to create that rant effect. Plus, the song had album cover guru Hugh Syme on synthesizers and two drum tracks by Neil. The album concludes with Vital Signs, which would not have sounded out of place on a Police album and is a great track. Moving Pictures was an instant smash peaking at #3 on the Billboard album charts and selling over 4 million copies in the US alone. Today, this album still sounds fresh and hasn't aged at all. This album belongs up there with The Dark Side of the Moon, Who's Next, Hotel California, A Night at the Opera and Sgt. Pepper. A classic!!!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars 'Confident their ways are best', March 19 2004
By 
N. P. Stathoulopoulos "nick9155" (Brooklyn, NY) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Moving Pictures (Audio CD)
This rightfully deserves its reputation as a top Rush album, if not the best effort in a sizeable catalogue.
Moving Pictures falls square in between the hard, progressive rock of their 70s concept albums and their later alternative sound with its embrace of synthesizers. There are synths, but they're worked in to accent the music here. With Signals, the 1982 followup, Rush would take on a more layered, synth-heavy sound where Alex Lifeson's guitar would serve more as color work, or even disappear into the mix later in the decade.
This album is concise, and the vinyl was programmed perfectly. With only seven tracks, there is no weakness here, and the first side features one famed piece after another. Side one opens with perhaps the band's most famous single, Tom Sawyer. The synth sound accents the hard riffs in this cynical ode to rebellion and individualism. Red Barchetta is a total fan favorite and live staple about a young man's weekly tradition of racing his uncle's old hot rod. YYZ is a funky instrumental that is also a live staple and instantly recognizable with its ride cymbal opening. Then Limelight brings it home with its deep, fat riffs in a song about the concept of fame (hence the title.)
The old second side is more cerebral, I think. Camera Eye is an 10+ minute epic, the last of its kind for the band. The music is phenomenol--this doesn't feel as long as it really is. Part of that is due to the structure of the song--it's split into two considerations of 'the city'. First it's New York, then London, talking about the hustle and bustle and the lives people have in these crowded spaces. The track is contemplative rock, highlighted by warm synths and excellent riffing. Then comes Witch Hunt, a superb track. It opens dark and menacing, the sounds of a colonial witch hunt (locals ranting and raving with imagery of pitchforks and torches) over an eerie synth. The song is monstrous--it opens up with Geddy's wailing and more synths, and Neil Peart's ridiculous fills. The whole album comes to a close with the tense but controlled Vital Signs, featuring more effective synth work, more contemplative lyrics.
Rush has always been a thinking man's rock group, going beyond the call of duty of rock to provide something of substance in a mass market field. They don't churn out tired love songs or whining odes to the misery of life. And how many groups can get away with lines like 'faces are twisted and grotesque'? Rush never makes the top of the charts, they don't make many videos, they don't live like decadent rock stars (though the guitarist had a particularly rock-star New Year's Eve incident turn ugly), they don't create controversy to mask a lack of talent, they don't resort to tricks or gimmicks.
The Rush remasters are very welcome, though the more valuable releases are the earlier ones that were recorded in analog. (Rush actually started going to digital recording pretty early.) It's interesting to listen to the new and then the old, and compare how the mix has changed. The traditionally crisp sound of the band is enhanced with the remasters and is clearer than ever. You can usually find them a bit cheaper than most new retail discs, though you may want to pick and choose your favorite Rush albums to upgrade.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2.0 out of 5 stars Hollow and Lifeless, March 22 2002
By 
P. Nicholas Keppler "rorscach12" (Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania United States) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Moving Pictures (Audio CD)
Fellow musicians may admire their radiant technical abilities but, to most of us, Geddy Lee, Neil Peart and Alex Lifeson, better known as Rush, make a pretty hideous combination. Not only are Mr. Lee's high-pitched vocals capable of startling every canine within a five mile-radiance of his revolting shriek, but his lyrics are some of the most pretentious, ridiculous and overtechnical blather in rock history. In the background, Mr. Peart and Mr. Lifeson meander on, spewing instrumentation that is as clean-cut and precise as one could hope, but does not have a drop of soul. A gratuitous layer of synthesizers completes this smooth, anti-septic product. Even Moving Pictures, their most accessible album (that at least spares listeners the Ayn Rand garbage) is an overglossed, hollow, lifeless creation. I may not know how to tune a guitar by ear or how to use a capo but I think I can tell that Rush is a...band.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars made for 5.1, April 5 2011
By 
Stephen Bieth (Mississauga/ Canada) - See all my reviews
(TOP 50 REVIEWER)   
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
You can't go wrong here. If your a rush fan you know how great the cd is. I like Rush but I don't love Rush. In fact most of their 80's output i would be happy to never hear again. But when Rush is good they are Great. And this (along with 2112. Wow could you imagine 2112 in 5.1. talk about a record made for the format) is Rush at their best. This CD is solid from start ti finish. The 5.1 mix on the Blu Ray is great. Clearest you have ever heard rush. I really hope that this is the begining of a re-issue program which would be amazing. Snakes and Arrows came in 5.1 and it wqs great. Now we get the amazing Moving Pictures. Keep the 5.1 coming!! It really is like a whole new way of listening to music and with 5.1 or 7.1 systems getting so cheap you don't have a reason not to.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


‹ Previous | 1 220 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First
ARRAY(0xb8548900)

This product

Moving Pictures
Moving Pictures by Rush (Audio CD - 1997)
Add to cart Add to wishlist
Only search this product's reviews