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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Revelation
"David Gilmour" was the first solo album by a Pink Floyd band member that quite clearly and powerfully revealed what that individual's contribution to the band actually was. Waters had his "The Body" much earlier but it was really a side-project that didn't quite give one much insight into what his input into the band really was. "David Gilmour" is just that, a...
Published on Sept. 8 2009 by Richard S. Warner

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3.0 out of 5 stars Dissapointed
A solo album from David Gilmour should be the perfect add on to anyone's album collection right? Well, judging by many of the songs on this self titled album the answer to that question may be a resounding hell no!. Dissapointing i know, especially considering Gilmour's incredible contributions to Pink Floyd: it was his visceral guitar tone and blistering riffs, not to...
Published on March 28 2004 by J. Martin


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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Revelation, Sept. 8 2009
By 
Richard S. Warner "Saraswati-Son" (Toronto, Canada) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: David Gilmour (Audio CD)
"David Gilmour" was the first solo album by a Pink Floyd band member that quite clearly and powerfully revealed what that individual's contribution to the band actually was. Waters had his "The Body" much earlier but it was really a side-project that didn't quite give one much insight into what his input into the band really was. "David Gilmour" is just that, a revelation.

Back when it first came out it was striking, that revelation, and you realized that a HUGE part of what was known and loved as Pink Floyd came from it's main vocalist and guitarist. This was Gilmour's very first step on the road to his massive success, both artistically and commercially, that eventually reached it's full flower with his "Live in Gdansk" Release.

It was a long haul over a few decades and this first effort did little to burnish Gilmour's name into the public consciousness. It took his battle to retain the Pink Floyd name after Waters' departure and the success of post-Waters Floyd to finally achieve that name recognition.

All that as history now, a listen to this album is still, 30 years later, a revelation. It's all there, everything the taciturn genius is capable of - great melodic development, rich, tasteful, distinctive guitar work, impeccable arrangements and ... that voice, that silky, honey toned voice that's capable of growling with grit as well.

Right from the start, "David Gilmour" has got you hooked and it stays that way right until the last massive chords of "I Can't Breathe Anymore" fade out at the end of it all. As good as Gilmour has become, and the man is an undisputed master, this album still contains some of his best work. I don't think there's been too many solo efforts from artists from famous bands that have worked as well, and stood the test of time, as David Gilmour's first solo album.

If you like, or love, Pink Floyd and have wondered if this album is worth it's price ... allay that fear immediately. Indispensible for anyone who loves Pink Floyd and richly rewarding to anyone who likes to listen to really damn fine music.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Best Pink Floyd solo effort, June 20 2004
By 
Terrence J Reardon "Classic rock guru" (Lake Worth, Florida, USA) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: David Gilmour (Audio CD)
Pink Floyd guitarist and vocalist David Gilmour released his self-titled solo debut in June of 1978. The album was recorded during down time in Pink Floyd's history. While David was making his solo album, bass player/vocalist Roger Waters created demos for The Wall and Pros and Cons while drummer Nick Mason was producing The Damned and Steve Hillage and keyboardist Rick Wright was making a solo album of his own Wet Dream. David's album was recorded in late 1977/early 1978 in Superbear Studios in France with David producing and handling guitars, vocals and keyboards. Also joining him were Roxy Music/future Foreigner bassist Rick Wills and Quiver drummer Willie Wilson, whom both had played with David in the power trio Bullet in 1967. This album kicks off with the great instrumental Mihalis which is a great guitar workout for Dave. The next song is There's No Way Out Of Here which is a laid back classic delivered with the minimum of fuss and overdubbing; Gilmour's voice rarely rising above a breath. This track was originally recorded by the band Unicorn as No Way Out of Here and this song was the single off the album doing well on rock radio in the US in 1978. Cry From the Street is a great number with some great playing. So Far Away is a nice ballad which has Dave singing calmly throughout. Short and Sweet kicks off the second half and was co-written by Dave with Roy Harper and is a great song. Raise My Rent is the second instrumental with more fretwork from Dave on the Fender Strat and the riff was inadvertently resurrected in 1994 on Pink Floyd's The Division Bell on What Do You Want From Me. The bluesy No Way follows and has a great Dave vocal and superb lap steel guitar work. It's Deafinitely follows and has superb guitar work from Dave. The album closes with the atmospheric I Can't Breathe Anymore which sounds like it could have appeared on a Floyd album. The album was a modest success as it peaked at #29 in the US and went Gold. The album has held up well over the years and is Highly Recommended!
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5.0 out of 5 stars David Gilmour shines on his own, May 14 2004
By 
Terrence J. Reardon (South Carolina and Mass., USA) - See all my reviews
This review is from: David Gilmour (Audio CD)
Pink Floyd guitarist and vocalist David Gilmour released his self-titled solo debut in June of 1978. The album was recorded during down time in Pink Floyd's history. While David was making his solo album, bass player/vocalist Roger Waters created demos for The Wall and Pros and Cons while drummer Nick Mason was producing The Damned and Steve Hillage and keyboardist Rick Wright was making a solo album of his own Wet Dream. David's album was recorded in late 1977/early 1978 in Superbear Studios in France with David producing and handling guitars, vocals and keyboards. Also joining him were Roxy Music/future Foreigner bassist Rick Wills and Quiver drummer Willie Wilson, whom both had played with David in the power trio Bullet in 1967. This album kicks off with the great instrumental Mihalis which is a great guitar workout for Dave. The next song is There's No Way Out Of Here which is a laid back classic delivered with the minimum of fuss and overdubbing; Gilmour's voice rarely rising above a breath. This track was originally recorded by the band Unicorn as No Way Out of Here and this song was the single off the album doing well on rock radio in the US in 1978. Cry From the Street is a great number with some great playing. So Far Away is a nice ballad which has Dave singing calmly throughout. Short and Sweet kicks off the second half and was co-written by Dave with Roy Harper and is a great song. Raise My Rent is the second instrumental with more fretwork from Dave on the Fender Strat and the riff was inadvertently resurrected in 1994 on Pink Floyd's The Division Bell on What Do You Want From Me. The bluesy No Way follows and has a great Dave vocal and superb lap steel guitar work. It's Deafinitely follows and has superb guitar work from Dave. The album closes with the atmospheric I Can't Breathe Anymore which sounds like it could have appeared on a Floyd album. The album was a modest success as it peaked at #29 in the US and went Gold. The album has held up well over the years and is Highly Recommended!
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3.0 out of 5 stars Dissapointed, March 28 2004
By 
J. Martin "hoarycripple" (Durango, Colorado United States) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: David Gilmour (Audio CD)
A solo album from David Gilmour should be the perfect add on to anyone's album collection right? Well, judging by many of the songs on this self titled album the answer to that question may be a resounding hell no!. Dissapointing i know, especially considering Gilmour's incredible contributions to Pink Floyd: it was his visceral guitar tone and blistering riffs, not to mention his highly orgasmic solos that brought commercial interest to the bands eclectic sound. Unfortunately on David Gilmour most of the songs suffer from an utter lack of melody, "Theres no way out of Here" has a plethora of riffs but no personality, the same goes from "Cry from the Street", "So far away", and "No Way". Stick to the instrumentals, "Mihalis" brims with laser beams of pure tone and "Raise my Rent" is brooding and wonderful, another classic David Gilmour solo that that brims with urgency, intensity and an incredibly clear sense of the real building blocks of crafting a musical release.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Strong effort of good old-fashioned rock and roll., Jan. 29 2004
By 
Ilker Yucel "Kryptych" (Annapolis, MD United States) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: David Gilmour (Audio CD)
David Gilmour is without a doubt one of the most underappreciated guitarists in the pantheon of rock guitar gods. From the standpoint of technique and skill, the man is unmatched, always playing very cleanly and with a tone that could rival Eric Clapton, but also playing with enough technical precision that he has complete control of his effects. He never lets his equipment rule him, but he always gets the most of out of it and still plays with as much soul as a classical blues player. So with his first album, he steps back from the overbloated song structures and neo-symphonic leanings of Pink Floyd (not that those things are bad, just it's good to get away from them sometimes) to create an album that is just some good old-fashioned rock and roll. There is a strong sense of Gilmour's blues and jazz influences here, as each song just resonates with that vibe of playing for fun and playing with heart. Some of the songs really evoke that old-school rock feeling, while others are just easy to sit back and relax to. "Mihalis" and "Raise My Rent" are slower, with some excellent solos and really strong melodies to just drift away, while "Cry From the Street," "Short and Sweet," and my personal favorite, "There's No Way Out of Here" are just straight rockers. "No Way" really gives the old-school blues feel a kick. The album is chock-full of Gilmour's signature sound, and he does really cut loose occasionally. The loud sliding solos on "It's Deafinitely" are just blistering...you could almost picture Gilmour's face tightening with intensity from the sound. All in all, it's a very good album from an amazing guitarist. Nothing really exceptional or special...just that damn good.
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4.0 out of 5 stars "It's all rock-and-roll to me.", Jan. 19 2004
This review is from: David Gilmour (Audio CD)
David Gilmour's self-titled first solo album was, without a doubt, the best one he did. While not always the most innovative member of the Floyd in terms of composing (lyrics and music), he does do a quality job here of making a rock album. Like any work written solely by Mr. Gilmour, this album relies on traditional chord structures and styles. The lyrics are also pretty ordinary, not always even seeming personal to him (guy wants girl, guy can't have girl), although occasionally with some interesting wordplay. If you enjoyed songs like "The Gold, it's in the..." and particularly "Childhood's End" from Obscured by Clouds, you should do well with this album.
Perhaps DG's musical best is "Raise My Rent", which, interestingly enough, seems to be the inspiration for "What Do You Want From Me?" on The Division Bell (my second favorite instrumential being "It's Deafinitely"). After that, I'd name "Short and Sweet", which departs a bit from a more standard rock format, giving it an easily memorable sound all to itself. That's the trouble with this album--that certain songs are too "standard', and while they're well made, and showcase Mr. Gilmour's guitar and vocal talents well, they don't really stick in the mind. "Mihalis" , for instance, while still very nice, is not as effective as Rick Wright's instrumental "Waves" in evoking the feel of the sea--one might guess the latter's subject matter without the title (Mr. Wright musically creates the sound of waves slapping into a boat's hull), whereas the subject of "Mihalis" requires explanation to get the intended images. Mihalis, incidentally, was the name of Mr. Gilmour's boat.
Here are two of the other noteworthy moments to watch for. Mr. Gilmour shows off his capabilities on multiple instruments on "Cry from the Street"--he does a nice job with the Hammond organ that would not seem out of place on a Pink Floyd album. Perhaps Rick Wright gave him lessons? If so, he seems to have paid attention. Also, the singing in "So Far Away" is some of the best I've ever heard from him anywhere, and perhaps the most difficult. The rapid note changes are quite impressive--not the sliding, warbling sound so common in today's second-rate radio garbage, but clear, crisp notes each individually sounded in rapid succession.
Overall, this rates as Mr. Gilmour's strongest album. Guitar enthusiasts will be happy to know that his playing excels throughout and his unique style is unmistakeable. The only drawback is, unlike Pink Floyd and Rick Wright's albums, other instruments aren't generally ever invited to the forefront. Even trumpet legend Miles Davis would yield the floor to other instruments, making his accomplishments no less remarkable. Something similar might have helped here. This, and other flaws, are why I can't award the full five stars. However, this album has *earned* its four through very good work, and I think most Floyd fans should definitely consider buying a copy.
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5.0 out of 5 stars top notch, Nov. 13 2003
By 
Scott Taylor (San Antonio, TX United States) - See all my reviews
This review is from: David Gilmour (Audio CD)
David Gilmour's personal single-song masterpiece is without doubt The Wall's "Comfortably Numb," but his talent as a musician, singer, and lyricist in Pink Floyd was too often cancelled by Roger Water's apparent insistence upon using Floyd's bully pulpit to tweak various political and cultural noses. Not that that doesn't have a place, but it was too often to the detriment--maybe Water's self-centered intent all along?--of Gilmour's musicianship.
With this album, Gilmour was able to escape Pink Floyd's shackles and demonstrate that he had talent to burn relative to what Floyd had enabled him to display. I also get the feeling that these were compositions he had kept in his back pocket and would not have let Waters anywhere near for fear that Pink Floyd might have bent them out of recognition.
"Mihalis" and "Cry from the Street" are wonderful, but vastly different, instrumental pieces, while "There's No Way Out of Here" and "Short and Sweet" are also highlights--the latter features some great wall of sound effect.
This is also a reunification of an earlier band, Bullitt, which featured Gilmour, Rick Wills on bass, and Willie Wilson on drums. (Bullitt disbanded when Gilmour moved on to Pink Floyd to replace the not quite dependable Syd Barrett.) Wills (who went on to stints with Peter Frampton, Roxy Music, and Foreigner) and Wilson provide steady, understated support on this album, letting Gilmour shine through.
This album is David Gilmour at his best. The subsequent "About Face" had some good points but was not as strong overall, and Bob Ezrin's production really got in the way. The sad thing is that the album is now about 25 years old, and he hasn't done anything even close to it since then.
If you want to hear what David Gilmour might have sounded like had there never ever been a Pink Floyd, this would be it.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Great Gilmour guitars and more..., June 9 2003
This review is from: David Gilmour (Audio CD)
Opinions: This solo effort by David Gilmour is great for his guitar skills and his voice. It isn't weighed down by the darkness of those late 1970s that is characteristic of Pink Floyd's releases of the time. One can even hear similar stylings from the Animals album such as a guitar effect from Dogs which is also in #4 here, or the ending to Sheep similar to the ending to #3 here. But enough of digging for little details. I have to say that I gave this 4 stars because of David Gilmour's words. There isn't the depth one may expect coming off of Dark Side of the Moon or Wish You Were Here albums and I believe if there were any doubt as to the power of the words of Roger Waters, such doubts are extinguished here. This does not sound like poetry and it seldom hits to the core of the listener. So with words aside, this album is great. The instrumentals (at least 3 here) give the impression that David Gilmour just couldn't wait to give a try at a solo album. One can almost hear the new Pink Floyd (post The Final Cut) waiting to be born. I recommend this to anyone who enjoys the Pink Floyd of the early to mid 1970s until Roger Waters assisted in depressing the planet Earth with his father issues and overly morose lyrics.
Facts: Released in between Animals and The Wall, this album contains the song There's No Way Out of Here and as well as no Roger Waters credited songs.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Gilmour for guitarists, Jan. 2 2003
By 
M. Burchill "Raven34" (Califon, NJ USA) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: David Gilmour (Audio CD)
So you play guitar and think Gilmour is God? ...No? Well, if he isn't God, then he's definitely sitting on the right hand of the father.
Although this album was made before Floyd split up, you can see through listening to this release where much of Floyd's sonic alchemy originates, at least as far as guitar work is concerned. For me, much of Floyd's power came from their concepts and what they (I guess Rodger more than David) had to say about society and the forces that shape the world we live in (geopolitics, remote-control high-tech war, danger of the 'cult-of-personality'). Sadly, this ablum and much of Gilmour's writing is devoid of any unifing 'concept' or theme.
This is a strong album musically but lacks a message. It's missing the thread that always seemed to tie together much of what Floyd was well known for producing - audio soundtracks that project the disaffection that many of us feel when we look out at the world. Looking back, most of that cohesiveness must have come from Rodger Waters and is sorely missed on this album.
In the end it's still a strong set of songs from a master of guitar and well worth listening to and owning... Just don't expect an overall theme or message.
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1.0 out of 5 stars Disappointing in a Puzzling Way, Feb. 21 2002
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This review is from: David Gilmour (Audio CD)
This is a rather naive, pointless, and humdrum solo debut from Pink Floyd's guitarist David Gilmour. This set finds the guitarist wandering aimlessly through the studio, yielding tedious melodies, less than inspired production techniques, and some of the most laughable lyrics, that sound as if they came from an amateur poet's internet haunt. (For instance "I can't breathe anymore/Why that is I'm not sure" or "What am I suspended here? Should I kid myself that I have no fear.") The problem with most of these lyrics is that they're too abstract, and they never address a specific topic or feeling...merely a bunch of non-related thoughts put into one stew.
Two of the most uninspired songs on "David Gilmour" are the inane 'No Way' and the repetitive 'There's No Way Out Of Here' (authored by Ken Baker). Three boring instrumentals, the worst of which being 'Mihalis,' don't help either. It's puzzling that a musician who has produced work so much better than this can yield something so uninspiring.
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