Customer Reviews


175 Reviews
5 star:
 (127)
4 star:
 (30)
3 star:
 (5)
2 star:
 (10)
1 star:
 (3)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favourable review
The most helpful critical review


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Waters' finest hour as a solo artist
Former Pink Floyd bassist/vocalist/mastermind Roger Waters released his third post-Pink Floyd solo effort Amused to Death in September of 1992. Amused to Death was over five years in the making due to his battle with his ex-bandmates on the rights to the Pink Floyd name. When Amused hit record stores, it was modestly received peaking at #21 on the US album chart and had a...
Published on June 21 2004 by Terrence J Reardon

versus
3.0 out of 5 stars A sub-editor, a sub-editor, my kingdom for a sub-editor...
Here Roger Waters displays his usual genius, which flawed by his usual failings in the sub-editing stage. The product (if I may be so bold as to commoditise an R. Waters record) is in part essential, in part thoroughly disposable. Which is ironic, given that that's what Waters spends over an hour railing against.
Should you have recently purchased a flash hi-fi...
Published on June 21 2000 by Olly Buxton


‹ Previous | 1 218 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Waters' finest hour as a solo artist, June 21 2004
By 
Terrence J Reardon "Classic rock guru" (Lake Worth, Florida, USA) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Amused To Death (Audio CD)
Former Pink Floyd bassist/vocalist/mastermind Roger Waters released his third post-Pink Floyd solo effort Amused to Death in September of 1992. Amused to Death was over five years in the making due to his battle with his ex-bandmates on the rights to the Pink Floyd name. When Amused hit record stores, it was modestly received peaking at #21 on the US album chart and had a huge rock radio hit with What God Wants Part 1. Roger's third solo album's sound was a return to the sound of his estranged former band, Pink Floyd unlike his two 80s works Pros and Cons or Radio K.A.O.S.. There are plenty of moments here (the aforementioned What God Wants(pt.1), the opening Ballad of Bill Hubbard, Three Wishes) that recall the sound of later Floyd works like Animals, The Wall and The Final Cut. Like those works, this is a concept album--the concept (as ever with Waters) being the crappy nature of modern life as depicted on television with the Gulf War and the Tijanamen Square incidents as examples and also the rise of a corporate world. His satire is blunt as usual and the targets of his scorn are obvious. Eagle drummer/vocalist Don Henley duets on Watching TV(which was about the Tijanamen Square incident and the collaboration of Henley and Waters triggered a friendship between the two which is still strong today). Legendary rock guitar legend Jeff Beck(like Clapton on Pros and Cons was a Yardbird) contributed taut, lyrical solos to a number of tracks(Bill Hubbard, What God Wants(pts. 1 and 3), Watching TV, Three Wishes, It's a Miracle and the closing optimistic title cut). The late conductor Michael Kamen contributed some stirring orchestrations on this album as well. Waters' voice was mainly reduced to a weary whisper, positively dripping with contempt due to the strain his vocal cords suffered from all the screaming on The Wall, The Final Cut and Pros and Cons of Hitchhiking. This album is a classic and a welcome return for Roger Waters. Highly recommended!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Not Bad Roger......, Jan. 27 2004
By A Customer
This review is from: Amused To Death (Audio CD)
It is common knowledge that all, or at least 99% of Floyd fans, fall into 2 categories...the Waters camp, and the other three. While I understand the deal with the breakup...Roger looked at it as firing Gilmour and Mason (Wright had already been canned), and the others looked at it as Waters quiting. I personally think it was a mistake for the others to continue with the name because Momentary Lapse and the other thing is NOT Floyd (there is a ton of money involved with the NAME 'Pink Floyd'). It is obvous that Waters and Gilmour apart will NEVER do the things they did, whatever they call themselves. That being said, I have always preferred Waters' music to the others. But again, it's NOT Floyd, so don't think anything Waters does will be Floyd, anymore that what the other three guys have done (or will do). But I will say that 'Amused to Death' is the best thing Waters has done since The Wall. I often wondered, after the breakup, what would it be like if Jimmy Page got together with Waters, or Alex Lifeson, or maybe Jeff Beck. Well, Mr. Beckola is here and he is awesome. There are parts where Beck makes his Strat sound like a monkey. The last 1/3 of this disc, beginning with 'What God Wants pt III' is absolutely stunning!! To those of you who didn't like 'Pros & Cons' (as I didn't, but loved the show in 85), and to those who maybe who have never heard KAOS, but heard it was a bore (as I haven't and did), then you will love this part of the recording. There are parts that are 'disgusted and pi@#ed off at the world' as is the norm for Roger, but some of this stuff is outta this world! Instead of Dogs, Pigs, and Sheep...we now have vultures, raccoons, magpies, and goundhogs, to name but a few. Every race, color, nationality, and religion, is insulted. There is a shadow of 'Echoes' (from Meddle) which has the same EXACT tone of Rick Wright's piano (I wonder if it was taken directly off the master tape), and Patrick Leonard has some erie keyboard work like that found on Animals. And in the midst of all this turmoil and insanity, 'they had sex in Pennsylvania' (interesting that Pennsylvania is mentioned, where 9 years later, 9/11 happened). This album, I truly believe, will have a much stronger message in the middle of this century, because of the GENIUS of this man, Roger Waters. But REMEMBER....THIS IS NOT FLOYD. But neither is any album, released by anyone, without this man. 4 stars only because of the mid part of the album bogs down a bit, and also Don Henley deserves no place on a work of art. By the way, why does this man not perform these albums in their entirety in concert? This man writes in a conceptual form, not a 'singles' frame of mind. And I hope Andrew Lloyd-Webber's fingers are healed. Certainly the most hilarious part of a musical work I have EVER heard. Roger Waters is SICK!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars I Guess He's Not Amused, Sept. 1 2003
By 
Paul Beaulieu (Montreal, Canada) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Amused To Death (Audio CD)
I remember first hearing this 11 years ago, and being so pleased at how good this album was- and at how good Roger Waters' material still could be.
OK, this is not everyone's cup of tea. Certainly the reaction of some critics was less than effusive. 'Yet another doom laden LP' was a typical comment. And although I'm glad he's doing what he's doing, sometimes I do wish he'd lighten up a bit every now and then. The good news, though, is that this set contains some great songs, and has the feel of a Pink Floyd concept album without being a pale copy. Waters' love of the blues is comes through here (he was always responsibile for the bluesier part of the Floyd repertoire), especially since he has Jeff Beck play some amazing lead guitar. As usual, the songs are linked by an almost cinematic soundtrack of background sound. The first part has more concise rock songs, the highlights being 'What God Wants Part 1", 'Perfect Sense Part 2', and 'The Bravery of Being Out of Range'. Then we have 'What God Wants Part 3', which still sends shivers down my spine, especially that Beck guitar solo, followed by Waters yelling 'Christ it's freezing outside, the veteran cried". It also starts off with the same piano 'ping!' that started off Floyd classic 'Echoes', before Waters sings "Don't be afraid/It's only business"- a not-at-all subtle dig at his former collegues, but then Waters has never been known for his subtlety. Towards the end, the songd get longer, more droning and more atmospheric- Floyd fans will probably like it, those insisting on concise, to-the-point songs will not.
Waters does have a tendancy to put things on his albums that are there to advance the 'concept' of the album, which are too wordy and add too little of musical value. In my view, 'Late Home Tonight' Parts 1 and 2 are in that category. Another complaint- Waters (never much of a singer) does not sing so much as croak. I had thought this was because he was getting older, but in fact he would sing some of these songs much better seven years later when he performed them live. Sometimes, though, his vocal limitations do create a certain something that helps the song. For instance, on 'What God Wants, Part 1", he sounds like an old prophet warning of death and destruction- which is rather fitting.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent Document of the Modern Age, Feb. 7 2003
By 
This review is from: Amused To Death (Audio CD)
It's easy to dismiss Amused to Death as no more than the cynical rantings of the dark and enigmatic Roger Waters, a man once labeled "the gloomiest man in rock." Certainly, it's no understatement to say that this album is so dreary it makes "The Wall" seem like a Jimmy Buffet album in comparison. Nevertheless, there's a wealth of lyrical talent to be found in Amused to Death, a sprawling epic that leaps from the pages of history and neatly summarizes the decline of civilization. Waters exposition begins with World War I, in "The Ballad of Bill Hubbard", and then takes the listener through Vietnam, Tienenmen Square, and all of the trademark details of the twentieth century - cable TV, laser guided bombs, Jessica Hahn, and so forth. He contends that the rise of the entertainment industry and media has destroyed the human spirit, wars have become entertainment, the people have become ignorant and unwilling to feel or care anymore. Take these conclusions or leave them if you prefer, but there's no denying that Waters is a master of words, and Amused to Death is humbling in it's lyrical power. There are moments of musical greatness here, augmented by near-perfect audio quality as only the perfectionist Waters would have it. It's heady stuff to be sure, but Amused to Death is a poignant summation of our times and a provocative, intelligent poem of worldly despair.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Wow!, Sept. 8 2002
By 
Aaron Bock (Cross Plains, WI United States) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Amused To Death (Audio CD)
This album is, hands down, Roger Waters' best solo work. I would go so far to say that it even rivals The Wall. Like The Wall, the album has a single collective message/concept behind it, one that is meant to stimulate the listener's thinking. I interpret it as saying that the human race is slowly destroying itself; the lyrics in the last song "Amused to Death" elude heavily to this. Waters develops this idea through songs that discuss the elements of society that are bringing us to our doom, such as organized religion ("What God Wants, Parts I, II, and III"), war and the military ("The Bravery of Being Out of Range, Late Home Tonight, Parts I, and II"), repression of free thought and speech ("Watching TV"), and failure to learn from our history("Perfect Sense, Part I"). Despite all the negativity, Waters does offer occasional glimmers of hope for us (something he's done more of in recent years), such as in "It's A Miracle" and perhaps (depending on how you interpret it) the closing monologue in "Amused to Death" (a continuation of the one in "The Ballad of Bill Hubbard; turn the volume up to hear it). The lyrics are consistently thought-provoking, occasionally depressing, but overall amazingly beautiful and clever. Musically, most of the songs are very relaxing. Perhaps this was Waters' intent, to relax the listener so he/she could take in the album's message and think about it more easily. As in his past solo works, Waters employs the talents of several legendary musicians, namely guitarists Jeff Beck and Don Henley. Beck doesn't play the usual style of rock guitar he's known for; his solos are much more reminiscent of David Gilmour, and almost as impressive and creative. The album does have a distinct Pink Floyd style to it, with many of the same musical elements (i.e. the Hammond organs, the trio of female backing vocalists, etc.). However, it does have a more "progressive" feel to it; Waters employs some sounds and effects that were more characteristic of the time that album was written (1992). A couple ending points,if you don't own a Roger Waters solo album yet, I highly recommend you buy this one first. While his others are also excellent works, this one is easily the best value for your money. And when you do buy it, set aside a spare hour and 20 minutes where you can listen to the whole thing uninterrupted. Like The Wall, all of the songs are great, but each becomes significantly better if you listen to the album all the way through.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars One of the most moving works ever recorded, May 15 2002
By 
Alex De Luca (Sunnyvale, CA United States) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Amused To Death (Audio CD)
Amused to Death is so moving. It's a work of passion that, when taken as a whole, can move you to tears. Each song is a deep look into humanity, media and things that just make us think about ourselves and the world. It's 70 minutes of brilliance. Roger Waters is in perfect form as the songwriter, player, singer, bandleader and, perhaps most of all, satirist. To me, this album greatly surpasses and previous Roger Waters solo release (all good, incidentally) but - now this will sound sacrilegious - any Pink Floyd release as well. Without being - how can I put this - "steered" by the likes of David Gilmore and the whole Pink Floyd machine, Waters does exactly what he sets out to do on his own terms. Listen to it. Listen to the lyrics. Listen to it - beginning to end - with a good pair of headphones on a good stereo in a darkened room and ALONE. Listen to everything going on in the background. It all means something. There is no single standout. It all stands out. It's ironic, humorous, sad, impassioned and poignant. If you're looking for music without a message that's three minutes long, don't listen to this. It's not "depressing", as is often associated with Water's music, it's thought provoking. The performances by all the musicians - in particular Jeff Beck - are flawless. They compliment the pieces they play on. Nothing is out of place. I couldn't possibly recommend this CD more.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars That's a cover band calling themselves "Pink Floyd"..., Feb. 13 2002
By A Customer
This review is from: Amused To Death (Audio CD)
Roger Water's opens "Amused To Death" by the spoken words of Alf Razzell, recorded during a recent telecision interview about his unenviable assignment of obtaining identification from the battlefield dead during WWII:
[Alf Razzell:] "Two things that have haunted me most are the days when I had to collect the paybooks; and when I left Bill Hubbard in no-man's-land. I was picked up and taken into their trench. And I'd no sooner taken two or three steps down the trench when I heard, "Ho Hello Razz, I'm glad to see you! This is my second night here,", he said "I'm feeling bad." And it was Bill Hubbard, one of the men we'd trained in England, one of the original battalion. I had a look at his wound; rolled him over and I could see it was probably a fatal wound. You could imagine what pain he was in, he was dripping with sweat; and after I'd gone about three shellholes, traversed that, had it been...had there been a path or a road I could have done better. He pummelled me, 'Put me down, put me down, I'd rather die, I'd rather die, put me down.' I was hoping he would faint. He said 'I can't go any further, let me die.' I said 'If I leave you here Bill you won't be found, let's have another go.' He said 'All right then.' And the same thing happened. he couldn't stand it any more, and I had to leave him there, in no-man's-land."
and this is how Roger Waters closes the CD:
[Alf Razzell:] "Years later, I saw Bill Hubbard's name on the memorial to the missing at Aras. And I...when I saw his name I was absolutely transfixed; it was as though he...he was now a human being instead of some sort of nightmarish memory of how I had to leave him, all those years ago. And I felt relieved, and ever since then I've felt happier about it, because always before, whenever I thought of him, I said to myself, 'Was there something else that I could have done?' [background: "I'd rather die, I'd rather die..."] And that always sort of worried me. And having seen him, and his name in the register - as you know in the memorials there's a little safe, there's a register in there with every name - and seeing his name and his name on the memorial; it sort of lightened my...heart, if you like."
[woman:] "When was it that you saw his name on the memorial?"
[Alf:] "Ah, when I was eighty-seven, that would be the year, ninete...eighty-four, nineteen eighty-four."
Not cheerful, not happy but incredibly powerful the same way that "The Final Cut" is. If you want a nice mindless romp, look under 'Brittney Spears'. If you desire a powerful, intelligent statement from a man who lost his father to the trenches of WWII, you have found it.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Who else could make an album w/ aliens and monkeys so good?, Dec 29 2001
By 
Arthur Laraby "jonmeadows" (Chicago, IL United States) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Amused To Death (Audio CD)
I have read a couple of reviews for this and other Roger Waters albums. The ones who hated it's resentments seems to come from the fact they didn't like Waters himself. Indeed, many people have sided with the other members of Pink Floyd when Roger left the band, and the fact Rog tried to prevent them touring and recording as "Pink Floyd" has hardened their dislike. They rejoice that he went on to an unsuccessful solo career, and disregard his solo work as trying to be what he was but failing. This is not true, as I enjoyed Amused to Death more than Pink Floyd's release a year later, the Division Bell. Maybe because Amused to Death seemed like it had something to say. Indeed it did, and although I tried to dislike this album, saying Roger's voice was gone, or he sounded like Bob Dylan (it seems that in rehearsals he actually did imitate him, though) I couldn't- this is Pink Floyd album, and a damn good one.
Roger's voice seems a bit old and creakier, but it suits his music just fine. A good example of this is Late Home Tonight, Part II where he plays parts outside himself ala The Wall. This also didn't bother me, because he still could sing, and in tracks like Amused to death, he uses this to a great advantage because he mixes his voice with a woman's amidst a tune and soundscape I'd describe as traveling over sunny green hills and valleys. This is truelly a beautiful song. Also, for the chorus of What God Wants, chilling female voices are used (much like the voice heard in Us and Them and other songs in The Dark Side of the Moon) is used, then a crowd (mob) of people, like The Wall.
I call this album a Pink Floyd album because it sounds like a good mixture of their albums, and one can pick out traits of these. og spent five years on this thing, and it shows in beauty, cohesiveness, and intelligence. He obviously wantd to show people what he could do. This album isn't for everyone, and it's dark tone is like that of The Wall, with more of a wink (with funny moments and lyrics- little things like the Yellow Rose of Watching TV being a "short order pastry chef", and other things in that song and the rest of the album). I can understand it's commentary can rub people wrong, and some may not think highly of the satirical barbs and such (excellently done) and resent or take offense to them. I found Jewel's on Peices of You to be angry and, although trying to be clever, clumsy- I suppose since Roger lost a father to the war, I understand and agree with on my own merit to The Bravery Of Being Out Of Range. I have not heard The final Cut, but it expands on the anger and hurt over the loss of his father expressed on The Wall, and, indeed, on Amused to Death's Three Wishes he wishes his father had not been killed. In any event, I really liked this album, and if you like Pink Floyd or admire good social commentary (Network was brought to mind), you probably will too.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A masterpiece, Nov. 16 2001
By 
This review is from: Amused To Death (Audio CD)
First of all, to keep up the tradition - a couple of words about Waters' vocals. It's just the case when you either love it or hate it - hating it, you say he can't carry a tune, he talks rather than sings, he's got a permanent sore throat etc etc. Loving it, you say that his manner is simply unique and not like anybody else's, and the more you listen to his voice, the more you sink into it, feel its nuances and emotions it renders. Well, I am definitely with the loving stock, and I want to say that if you do manage to "tune in" his voice, it will bring you a very deep and keen pleasure.
On to the album itself. I am a great fan of what is largely referred to as post-Barrett-Waters's-pre-Gilmour era of PF :)))) To me the last album of PF is The Final Cut. If we compare these two albums, ATD and TFC, TFC (one of my favourites) has what I would call an ascetic mood, which is absolutely perfect in the context of the album. ATD is on the opposite end - it's music is indeed fully developed, vast and overwhelming, which in its turn is great. It is a concept album, and it has those part 1,2,3 that we all are used to. But, just like the musical work from The Wall, it has a whole range of excellent melodies - What God Wants, Amused to Death, The Bravery, Watching TV, Three Wishes, It's a Miracle, Perfect Sense... The power of the music and Roger's voice and lyrics is enormous and makes you shiver. Waters the Poet and Waters the Musician are equal.
On to the message. It was said a lot of times. The key words: stupidity, hypocrisy, profanation, inability to deal with the truth of what we are doing, superficiality of contemporary TV culture etc. I wanted to attract your attention to the following issues. First of all, the concept of God in What God Wants. To me, it's not just about different people using the name of God as a smokescreen for their ugly actions. It seems to be deeper, it goes right to this ancient question: if God is good, where does the evil come from? Here you are - God indeed wants it all (because otherwise there would be no freedom of choice for us?) And this verse - What God wants, God gets, GOD HELP US ALL is brilliant. What a pessimism and desperation - God wants semtex, God gets it, and we can only try to protect ourselves and ask God to help us... Another brilliant idea - in Watching TV. She's the one in fifty million who can help us to be free - Because she died on TV. That's so TRUE - thousands of people die under the same circumstances, but here's the power of TV - somebody decided "Let's make a conceptually new symbol of a young inspired martyr for freedom", and there she is dying on TV, and all of us crying over her death. What about unknown Jews and Aztec and Russians and Afghanistan girls? No way, we won't care until it is shown on TV. Moreover, nobody will show it to us until they need it for their own purposes.
All in all, every song deserves a separate analysis. This album is on par with PF best works (and IMHO much better than the praised Dark Side). I wouldn't recommend it to anyone and everyone. It is a serious artwork that needs your attention and definitely at least three listenings to start liking it.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars Roger's best solo album without question, June 11 2004
By 
Terrence J. Reardon (South Carolina and Mass., USA) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Amused To Death (Audio CD)
Former Pink Floyd mastermind Roger Waters released his third post-Pink Floyd solo effort Amused to Death in September of 1992. Amused to Death was over five years in the making due to his battle with his ex-bandmates on the rights to the Pink Floyd name. When Amused hit record stores, it was modest received peaking at #21 and had a huge rock radio hit with What God Wants Part 1. Roger's third solo album's sound was a return to the sound of his estranged former band, Pink Floyd unlike his 80s works like Pros and Cons or Radio K.A.O.S. There are plenty of moments here (the aforementioned What God Wants(pt.1), the opening Ballad of Bill Hubbard, Three Wishes) that recall the sound of later Floyd works like Animals, The Wall and The Final Cut. Like those works, this is a concept album--the concept (as ever with Waters) being the crappy nature of modern life as depicted on television with the Gulf War and the Tijanamen Square incidents as examples and also the rise of a corporate world. His satire is blunt as usual and the targets of his scorn are obvious. Eagle drummer/vocalist Don Henley duets on Watching TV(which was about the Tijanamen Square incident and the collaboration of Henley and Waters triggered a friendship between the two which is still strong today). Legendary rock guitar legend Jeff Beck(like Clapton on Pros and Cons was a Yardbird) contributed taut, lyrical solos to a number of tracks(Bill Hubbard, What God Wants(pts. 1 and 3), Watching TV, Three Wishes, It's a Miracle and the closing optimistic title cut. The late Michael Kamen contributed some stirring orchestrations on this album as well. Waters' voice was mainly reduced to a weary whisper, positively dripping with contempt due to the strain his vocal cords suffered from all the screaming on The Wall, The Final Cut and Pros and Cons. This album is a classic and a welcome return for Roger Waters. Highly recommended!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


‹ Previous | 1 218 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

This product

Amused To Death
Amused To Death by Roger Waters (Audio CD - 1992)
Add to cart Add to wishlist
Only search this product's reviews