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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The triumphant comeback of Pink Floyd ten years on
Pink Floyd's most recent album The Division Bell was released in April of 1994(two full months before I graduated High School). The album was the first since their 1987 comeback A Momentary Lapse of Reason. The band spent four years on the Momentary project recording and touring(the tour ended in 1990). The band were inactive in 1991 and spent 1992 putting together the...
Published on June 21 2004 by Terrence J Reardon

versus
3.0 out of 5 stars Nice mellow stuff
Man, i miss the angry floyd of the wall, and final cut, yeah I miss roger. However that doesn't stop High hopes great day for democracy and Wearing the inside out from shining through. Those are the three stars, the rest seems a little dull for me, marooned is predictable. It is nice to hear the boys singing hopefully though.
Also the production is weird, reverbed...
Published on April 24 2004 by Joshua Alex Dolf


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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The triumphant comeback of Pink Floyd ten years on, June 21 2004
By 
Terrence J Reardon "Classic rock guru" (Lake Worth, Florida, USA) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Division Bell (Audio CD)
Pink Floyd's most recent album The Division Bell was released in April of 1994(two full months before I graduated High School). The album was the first since their 1987 comeback A Momentary Lapse of Reason. The band spent four years on the Momentary project recording and touring(the tour ended in 1990). The band were inactive in 1991 and spent 1992 putting together the Shine On box. It was during an American radio interview in late 1992 that guitarist/vocalist David Gilmour revealed that the band would finally begin work on a new album in 1993. David, along with drummer Nick Mason and a fully reinstated keyboardist Rick Wright(whom was a sideman on the Momentary Lapse album and tour) recorded The Division Bell throughout 1993 and January of 1994 at David's own houseboat studio The Astoria with David producing with Bob Ezrin. When the album was released(I bought the CD the day it came out and the aqua blue vinyl and cassette), it was an instant smash hitting #1 in its first week and stayed put for four weeks in the Spring of 1994 whilst the band toured in support of the album and sold close to Four million in the US alone and many more worldwide. When I first put this album on, it reminded me of Wish You Were Here which is my favorite Pink Floyd album. This was the band's first theme album in years with its concept about lack of communication. The opening Cluster One is a superb instrumental and one of their best ever. What Do You Want From Me sounds like Have a Cigar(pt. 2) and is a great song and Dave and Rick's music just being as great as ever. The haunting Poles Apart starts out being about Syd and his descent into madness while the second verse (Hey You!) addresses the demise of David's relationship with Waters and then ends with Gilmours own self doubts about where he stands in the grand scheme of Pink Floyd and realizing in the end that his own personal life and love is where he keeps his sanity grounded. The Grammy winning instrumental Marooned is a lovely piece of music which is superb. A Great Day For Freedom talks about the fall of The Berlin Wall and the fall of one's relationships. Wearing The Inside Out is Rick's personal aside about his own exile both physically from the band and mentally and featured returning sax player Dick Parry whom last played on Wish You Were Here. Take it Back is the closest Floyd ever came to a love song. Coming Back to Life is Dave's song to his now wife Polly Samson whom brought him back to happiness after all the traumas with Roger and the demise of his first marriage to Ginger in 1990. Polly was actually proofreader to Dave's lyrics on The Division Bell and out of kindness gave her credit. Keep Talking was the song that got loads of airplay on rock radio when released and sounds like classic Floyd from Dark Side and Wish You Were Here era Floyd. Lost For Words dealt with the demise and failed reconciliation with Waters. The closing High Hopes is the best Floyd track since Comfortably Numb which was about the things you gained and lost in life. The Division Bell is a great album and might possibly be the final album from the band. Although Dave said Floyd was done in 2001, he changed his stance in 2003 saying "Floyd still exists and will return one day but not tomorrow". However if Floyd don't return, this album ends their career with a bang! Hugely recommended!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars a masterpiece, July 16 2004
By A Customer
This review is from: Division Bell (Audio CD)
pogo needs an ass beating.dont you think so?????.just check out his foolish reviews and you will see that while he has given great albums like wish you were here by the great pink floyd one stars,he has on the other hand given crappy albums by talentless overrated filth like britney spears and madonna five stars.i would advise you to ignore this joker's(pogo) stupid recommendations and buy this classic immortal album which has stood as a classic three decades after it was recorded.five stars.
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5.0 out of 5 stars The triumphant return of Pink Floyd ten years on, June 11 2004
By 
Terrence J. Reardon (South Carolina and Mass., USA) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Division Bell (Audio CD)
Pink Floyd's most recent album The Division Bell was released in April of 1994(two full months before I graduated High School). The album was the first since their 1987 comeback A Momentary Lapse of Reason. The band spent four years on the Momentary project recording and touring(the tour ended in 1990). The band were inactive in 1991 and spent 1992 putting together the Shine On box. It was during an American radio interview in late 1992 that guitarist/vocalist David Gilmour revealed that the band would finally begin work on a new album in 1993. David, along with drummer Nick Mason and a fully reinstated keyboardist Rick Wright(whom was a sideman on the Momentary Lapse album and tour) recorded The Division Bell throughout 1993 and January of 1994 at David's own houseboat studio The Astoria with David producing with Bob Ezrin. When the album was released(I bought the CD the day it came out and the aqua blue vinyl and cassette), it was an instant smash hitting #1 in its first week and stayed put for four weeks in the Spring of 1994 whilst the band toured in support of the album and sold close to Four million in the US alone and many more worldwide. When I first put this album on, it reminded me of Wish You Were Here which is my favorite Pink Floyd album. This was the band's first theme album in years with its concept about lack of communication. The opening Cluster One is a superb instrumental and one of their best ever. What Do You Want From Me sounds like Have a Cigar(pt. 2) and is a great song and Dave and Rick's music just being as great as ever. The haunting Poles Apart starts out being about Syd and his descent into madness while the second verse (Hey You!) addresses the demise of David's relationship with Waters and then ends with Gilmours own self doubts about where he stands in the grand scheme of Pink Floyd and realizing in the end that his own personal life and love is where he keeps his sanity grounded. The Grammy winning instrumental Marooned is a lovely piece of music which is superb. A Great Day For Freedom talks about the fall of The Berlin Wall and the fall of one's relationships. Wearing The Inside Out is Rick's personal aside about his own exile both physically from the band and mentally and featured returning sax player Dick Parry whom last played on Wish You Were Here. Take it Back is the closest Floyd ever came to a love song. Coming Back to Life is Dave's song to his now wife Polly Samson whom brought him back to happiness after all the traumas with Roger and the demise of his first marriage to Ginger in 1990. Polly was actually proofreader to Dave's lyrics on The Division Bell and out of kindness gave her credit. Keep Talking was the song that got loads of airplay on rock radio when released and sounds like classic Floyd from Dark Side and Wish You Were Here era Floyd. Lost For Words dealt with the demise and failed reconciliation with Waters. The closing High Hopes is the best Floyd track since Comfortably Numb which was about the things you gained and lost in life. The Division Bell is a great album and might possibly be the final album from the band. Although Dave said Floyd was done in 2001, he changed his stance in 2003 saying "Floyd still exists and will return one day but not tomorrow". However if Floyd don't return, this album ends their career with a bang! Hugely recommended!
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5.0 out of 5 stars The Ring of Truth, May 28 2004
By 
Eugenius Dobson (from a global perspective I'm right here.) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Division Bell (Audio CD)
Where Wish you were Here was a tribute to founding member Syd Barrett, The Division Bell is an examination of the situation between Waters and the Band at the time. The two stone heads facing each other on the cover pretty much sums up the problem: both camps were being stubborn and neither were budging. However, The Band recognized that communication needed to be restored and Gilmour did attempt to restore that communication with Waters, as summarized in the final verses of the second to last song, Lost For Words. While communication is the major theme running through the record, the internal band problems are suggested through various Floydian references all throughout the album. What do you Want From Me uses some of the funk grooves from Have a Cigar, while Gilmour asks Waters clearly if he wouldn't rather just take back complete control of the band again. Poles Apart starts out being about Syd and his descent into madness while the second verse (Hey You!) addresses Waters. The interlude uses sound effects of things that rotate on an axis, except for one snippet of a plane taking off from the original Atom Heart Mother performances, and then ends with Gilmours own self doubts about where he stands in the grand scheme of Pink Floyd and realizing in the end that his own personal life and love is where he keeps his sanity grounded. Marooned is a mood piece that suggests that impasse that people reach when they can't come to a good compromise. It's both sad and angry all at once. A Great Day For Freedom talks about different occasions of breakdowns that lead to new beginnings, again with the reference to the Floyd and it's total state of chaos by the end of The Wall project (On the day the wall came down this ship of fools had finally run aground) and Waters break from contract and the legal threat with all the court paper filings (promises lit up the night like paper doves in flight.) Wearing The Inside Out is a personal aside about Wright's own exile, both physically from the band, and mentally. Take it Back uses the analogy of how Mother Nature might one day take back the earth if we continue to abuse it, with how we all fight back against personal abuses and attacks and Coming Back to Life details the struggle to rise up after all of those attacks.
Keep Talking expresses a regret for not saying something sooner before problems got out of control, whispered in an almost Waters like tone, while Lost For Words again details the battle of words and the attempt to patch things up that gets met with viscous words in return. High Hopes concludes things with a fond look back at happier days and the hope that those happier days aren't completely lost in the past.
On a side note I want to address the issue of Gilmour and the slew of writers given credit on Momentary Lapse and to some small extent on this recording. Jon Carin said in an interview that he had made a sound with the keyboard that Gilmour liked and used it in the song Learning to Fly and then gave him a writing credit for it. Gilmour spent many years helping to form a lot of Waters' work without ever getting credit, only to find that now it has come back to haunt him because it looks like Waters did everything. So Gilmour decided to be fair and just with everyone and give any input a credit to the person who provided it. But you just can't win because now he's getting damned for that too, because it makes it look like he can't write anything without a lot of help, whereas Carin made a point that 99% of the Momentary album is Gilmours own writing. Being generous is just in his nature. Waters claims to be the exact opposite of Gilmour philisophically, and it certainly seems like it.
While Waters still continues to belittle Gilmour's work in Pink Floyd, and rewrites his own history of what happened in the band (these days he's saying he was forced out of the group!), The Division Bell is musically and lyrically a poetic observation on that whole mess and the only perspective that seems to have the ring of truth about it.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Ah, Yes, The Post-Waters Prejudice, May 9 2004
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This review is from: Division Bell (Audio CD)
Music is just music. To me, this album is one of the best albums ever made. It is not a curveball into commercialism (nor was Momentary Lapse of Reason). When a band member has left, you must EXPECT a different sound - what surprises me, is how similar it is to old Floyd - not that the rest of the world doesn't disagree with me, of course - but don't think I don't know what I'm talking about. The early Floyd was about painting a picture, an ambience, a work of art, not a series of singles and/or filler. The Division Bell has something in common with the older works. It too, is more than just a series of singles and/or filler. So what if a song appeals to lots of people? Oftentimes, it's because the song is shallow and simple, yes, but sometimes the stars do line up right - and this is coming from a pessimist, mind you - and there is the same unified atmospheric creation to this that there is to Atom Heart Mother, it's just the songs are different lengths and the thematic material is different. Ok, and some instrumentation differences.... but still... "Poles Apart", "Coming Back to Life", "A Great Day for Freedom", "Lost for Words" ? If you want to zone out after a rough day, or meditate to music, or whatever you like doing....do not avoid this album. There is emotional spirituality in this album that is rarely found in music these days, or anywhere, for that matter. Avoid the prejudice and the album will love you back.
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3.0 out of 5 stars Nice mellow stuff, April 24 2004
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This review is from: Division Bell (Audio CD)
Man, i miss the angry floyd of the wall, and final cut, yeah I miss roger. However that doesn't stop High hopes great day for democracy and Wearing the inside out from shining through. Those are the three stars, the rest seems a little dull for me, marooned is predictable. It is nice to hear the boys singing hopefully though.
Also the production is weird, reverbed to the point of being muddy. However if I had to compare the production values to Radio Kaos, I'd go with the reverb over the synthesizers and nonsence, because the reverb doesn't ruin the songs.
In my opinion Pros and cons of hitch hiking is better, and so is the majority of Amused to death, but it is better than Radio Kaos and some songs on Amused to death. Also, when it come to Pink Floyd all "classic" era floyd (1973-1979) is better, and so is meddle. In my opinion this is a little better than Piper and Saucer full of secrets (damn this album is good though) but better than all else in the catolog.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Hugely Underrated, April 14 2004
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This review is from: Division Bell (Audio CD)
I'm not a classic Floyd fan. I didn't grow up during their time, and I wasn't fortunate enough to have a parent, brother, sister or friend attempt to force them upon me in my youth. I knew of Pink Floyd, but I didn't know them. It wasn't until "Division Bell" was released did I even attempt to consume what Floyd had to offer. "Take It Back," not surprisingly, was the song that first caught my attention. So I bought "Division Bell." My first Floyd album. That was 10 years ago. I was 18.

Fast forward to 2002. I don't know what happened. I can't explain it. I had owned "Division Bell" for 8 years. But I still didn't get it. Until one day - I got it. I love this record. It's gorgeous. It's majestic. And it's oh so David Gilmour. I suppose that's the point. I became a serious David Gilmour fan. And a serious Pink Floyd fan, too. For 2 years now I've traveled the long and glorious history of Pink Floyd. From Syd to Dave. From pre Dark side to post Dark Side. All the way to "Division Bell" - my proverbial pot of gold. In a way, I feel bad for long time Floyd listeners. I can genuinely see how "Division Bell" might be difficult to digest. My unsolicited recommendation is this - empty your mind of all pre conceived ideas of what and who Pink Floyd are and try to listen to "Division Bell" as a clean slate. Maybe "Division Bell" isn't Pink Floyd. Maybe it is. In my opinion, it doesn't matter. "Division Bell" stands on it's own as a classic piece of work - no matter who created it.
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4.0 out of 5 stars 3 and 3/4 stars, April 7 2004
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This review is from: Division Bell (Audio CD)
Well, David Gilmour, Nick Mason, and Richard Wright are back after the uninspired Momentary Lapse of Reason. Like the last album, the highlights of the good songs is Gilmour's awesome guitar soloing. And like the previous album, the downpoint of most songs is the singing. More than a few songs are marred by Gilmour's lazy singing. However, on some tracks, he definitely puts forth more effort than usual (like on the instrumental "Marooned" for instance). A lot of the tracks on Division Bell made it on to Pink Floyd's Greatest Hits album. With good reason, too. Songs like "What Do You Want From Me," "Wearing the Inside Out" and "Keep Talking" sound just like something you'd hear on the radio. This is atypical Floyd for those of you who aren't familiar with the classic (70s) version of the band. The Pink Floyd I have come to like didn't really care if their songs were radio friendly or not. They could take twenty or more minutes playing out a single song and then succeed awesomely and really reward their audience with great music. "High Hopes" is more reminiscent of Great Floyd. This song manages to benefit from Gilmour's singing (which isn't all that bad on this one). The lyrical content of this album is on a whole better than their previous effort, but it pales in comparison to anything written with former bassist/singer Roger Waters. "High Hopes" is the exception. In addition to good lyrics, the guitar work in "High Hopes" is, as usual, fantastic (really emotional solo at the end).
If you are into Pink Floyd and you haven't got this, you don't need it. You may want to try Pulse first as it has the best of Division Bell performed live (and better in my opinion). If you already have their Greatest Hits album, you definitely don't need this unless you're a completist. First timers to the band, however, won't be dissapointed. As I pointed out, there are a fair amount of readily likable "radio friendly" songs on this and of course the Division Bell is so much better than most of the new material being chunked out by some bands these days.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Above average, but not Pink Floyd's best album, March 18 2004
This review is from: Division Bell (Audio CD)
After purchasing dark side of the moon and listening to a lot of Pink Floyd music, I got interested in their most recent album, the division bell. While purchasing it, several questions emerged. Could it compare to pink floyd's earlier music? Would the band sound any different without Roger Waters? Will this rash ever go away? Well, as it turns out, Division bell is a good album. Not fantastic, but good. So let's rate this album!
1. Cluster One 10/10
a slow, calm song that makes a great opener to the album. The keyboard, guitar, and slow feel are all reminiscent of several of Pink Floyd's dark side of the moon songs.
2. What do you want from me 9/10
a nice, bluesy song thats good for a listen.
3. Poles apart 10/10
a very good song, featuring some nice acoustic guitar and with interesting lyrics.
4. marooned 10/10
another one of my favorites on the album, a nice instrumental piece that shows Pink Floyd can definatley still play
5. A great day for freedom 7/10
typical depresing Pink Floyd music, accompinied by piano and not much else. Its sort of a boring song, and not really one I like that much
6. Wearing the inside out 8/10
an okay song,good to listen to but nothing that special
7. take it back 7/10
8. Coming back to life 9/10
an improvment from the previous songs, and the following songs will only get better
9. keep talking 10/10
Finally, a really good song after some rather mediocre stuff in the middle. It makes me glad that a band thats been playing for so long can still play.
10. Lost for words 10/10
a very catchy song, really fun and interesting. Its kind of a song of hope, but also sort of negative at the same time. Its hard to explain.
11. High hopes 10/10
Another really good song, a great way to bring the album to a close. Also pretty catchy lyrics and piano, and the bells are in interesting addition to the song, albiet(I don't think I spelled that right) cliche.
total score: 99/110
I have some mixed opinions of the album. Part the album is not really that great. I don't really think filler is the right word, but I expect better from Pink Floyd. Its not the best, looking at Pink Floyds albums as a whole, but its not bad at all. Infact, I really thing I'm being too hard on the album. Its really not that bad, infact, I reccomend buying it if you like pink floyd. I just noticed several things about the album. The guitar is not as frequent as on most Floyd albums, and there's more acoustic than electric. Then again, I like acoustic guitar, and it does sound nice on this album as well. The lyrics are pretty depressing at times, but Pink Floyd does have a depressing side, and I don't really mind. Overall, it is a good album, though, and I hope you like it.
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5.0 out of 5 stars The Floyd at their best!!, Jan. 29 2004
This review is from: Division Bell (Audio CD)
I have been a Pink Floyd fan for years, and I am also a Roger Waters fan (inlcluding his solo works). Therefore, I believe I can say without bias that this is truly a masterpiece. While it's true that this is not the same Pink Floyd many fans are accustomed to (particularly those who grew up in the 70's), the remaining three members put together a work of art which would not have been possible with Waters present. Waters was very restrictive of the band's work (ever seen Live at Pompeii?) and forced his own ideas (while very interesting) into the foreground while pushing everything else the band wanted to do aside. He even went as far as to force Richard Wright out of the band and this produced terrible results (the Final Cut is less than satisfactory in my opinion).
This album starts off with a spacey track titled "Cluster One". It sounds like radio static or something of the like, but it's very ambient. Other favorites include "Poles Apart", which appears to be written for Syd Barrett (including a nice little segment of carnival music--very good for expressing the idea of insanity, it comes accross well), "Wearing The Inside Out", a taste of Richard Wright's melancholy ambience, "Take It Back", a beautifully passionate piece, "Coming Back To Life", which has a very nice guitar solo and deep lyrics (Dave and Polly really did an awesome job here--It's amazing what can happen when two soulmates work together on a musical piece--it gives it a spiritual element that can't be reached any other way), "Lost For Words" which sounds as though it was written for Roger Waters, but only Dave can answer that, and last but certainly not least, "High Hopes", a song every Pink Floyd fan knows and loves. The slide solo on this track is nothing short of amazing.
If you enjoyed Momentary Lapse of Reason (another awesome album), then this is definitely for you. These two albums almost fit together--Momentary Lapse is about coming together, whereas The Division Bell is about growing apart. They really ought to release these two as a 2-CD set. Excellent Job to Dave (and Polly), Nick, and Rick! Shine on!
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Division Bell
Division Bell by Pink Floyd (Audio CD - 1994)
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