Customer Reviews


50 Reviews
5 star:
 (42)
4 star:
 (5)
3 star:    (0)
2 star:
 (2)
1 star:
 (1)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favourable review
The most helpful critical review


5.0 out of 5 stars Neil's Best Album
Rust Never Sleeps was the first Neil Young album that I learned how to play songs from. My My, Hey Hey was the first one that I learned. However, later on Ride My Llama became my favorite.
Published 8 months ago by Gary Bowers

versus
0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Rust never sleeps; a great album
Neil Young and Crazy Horse put together a fantastic album with Rust Never Sleeps, from the sensitive Thrasher (my fave on the album) to heavy guitar like Powderfinger, that just make you sing along. The only song not to peticular to me was Welfare Mothers...but who cares about one little song right? Being able to see Neil perform most of these songs along with Crazy...
Published on Oct. 1 2001 by thrashramy


Most Helpful First | Newest First

5.0 out of 5 stars Rust Rips!!!!!, March 4 2002
This review is from: Rust Never Sleeps (Audio CD)
Neil Young's "Rust Never Sleeps" was originally two album sides--one acoustic (the first five tracks) and one electric (the last four with Crazy Horse). As with most proper albums, the cd is fairly short (less than 39 minutes) but the listener still gets his money's worth. Acoustically, Neil has never sounded better. 'My My, Hey Hey' is terrific and even rivals its explosive, electric sibling 'Hey Hey, My My'. In between the rock n' roll classic bookends are some great acoustic numbers ('Thrasher' is one of the hardest rocking acoustic tracks I've heard, and 'Pocahontas' is simply perfect) and the riproaring, electrically charged 'Powderfinger'. The acoustic/electric mix works perfectly and by the time the last guitar-feedback-fury finishes bouncing around inside your head, you'll want to hear the acoustic side again. A terrific cd in every respect.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4.0 out of 5 stars The Acoustic Music is Better than the Rock Music On This CD, May 20 2001
This review is from: Rust Never Sleeps (Audio CD)
The first acoustic songs have a lot of beguiling melodies and lyrics that range from foreboding to witty to peaceful. Powderfinger is the best rocker. Near the end of the album, I realized that Neal wasn't going to keep up the perfection of the previous songs. The rockers Welfare Mothers and Sedan Delivery are the weakest songs because they lack subtlety and are too primitive, but they are energetic and absurdly fun. The blaring heavy metal version of Hey Hey rocks a little clumsily and is not as good as the acoustic version. More is less in this case. But all in all, this is a good performance by the ever quirky Neil Young.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars Marlon Brando, Pocahontas & Me, May 10 2001
By 
David Bradley "David Bradley" (Sterling, VA USA) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Rust Never Sleeps (Audio CD)
I'm one of the lucky thousands who saw Neil Young on the tour where he recorded RUST NEVER SLEEPS and, never having been much of a fan of his prior to that, it was an eye-opener.
The first set, like the first side of this LP, was the acoustic Neil everyone knew. But when amps began to hum and the lights came up for the second set, you knew you were about to experience something different.
Crazy Horse, the most under-rated live act in Rock history, roared--and I do mean ROARED--through the set. Young's guitar was blazing, just shooting off those odd licks of his like little bolts of lightning.
That concert is perfectly reflected on RUST NEVER SLEEPS. These are some of Young's best songs, especially "Pocahontas" and "Powderfinger." And Crazy Horse is the thunder to Young's lightning.
I've never cared as much about the supposed social commentary so many critics see in this album as I do about his argument and his plea for artistic freedom. Young was something of a moving target in the 1960s and early 1970s, doing acoustic and electric folk, folk-rock, and some protest music. What I hear him saying on RUST NEVER SLEEPS is that an artist has to force his own growth, experiment and take chances, or he'll end up producing nothing or, worse yet, producing pablum (are you listening, Graham Nash?). Since RUST NEVER SLEEPS, Young has made techno, rockabilly, country, heavy metal, and avante garde records. Some have been great, some have been failed experiments. But Young has been the most courageous and sincere artists of the era, and deserves the credit grunge rockers have given him. He has remained true.
By the way--can we not call him a great American rock star? He's Canadian.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars Rust Burns, May 4 2001
This review is from: Rust Never Sleeps (Audio CD)
After the quiet, soft sounds of Comes A Time, Neil Young & Crazy Horse followed that album up with angry, powerful rock of Rust Never Sleeps. Inspired by the punk movement, Mr. Young fashioned an album of critical songs with powder keg intensity. It's not all about electric guitars as the first five songs are acoustic based, but they are powerful in their delivery. "My, My, Hey, Hey (Out Of The Blue)" is about Elvis Presley & Johnny Rotten, rock & punk and contains his most famous line, "it's better to burn out than fade away", which has become part of the lexicon. "Powderfinger", "Welfare Mothers" and "Sedan Delivery" are among the most outspoken and critical songs of his career and the punk ethos he brings to them add more bite and edge. "Pocahontas" is one of the best songs Mr. Young has ever written, with its vivid lyrics of a trapper who would give 1,000 pelts just to sleep with Pocahontas, the song is powerful, imaginative and absolutely brilliant. The album closes out with a full blow reprise of the opener, this time titled "Hey, Hey, My, My (Into The Black)" and its echoes the sentiments of the acoustic take. Rust Never Sleeps was a great work and a big hit, peaking at number 7 on the album charts.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars Back to Basics, April 7 2001
By 
This review is from: Rust Never Sleeps (Audio CD)
I've amassed quite a collection of music over the years, and as an old guy pushing 50, I try keep up with what is going on in the recording world. I'm not the biggest Neil Young fan in the world, but when I'm looking though my collection looking for something interesting to play, I'm sometimes a bit suprised to find I've got almost everything Neil Young has released. It's been a couple of years since "Rust Never Sleeps" hit my CD player. Yeah, the acoustic versus electric stuff is cool...and people can read a lot into the social commentary of the words...but I'd rather sit back after a couple of beers, let the music roll over me, and think to myself that this guy is truly a piece of work. It might be hard to pin a label on the style, but I don't care, I'm still blown away.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars Part two of one of rocks best "back to back" CDs ever., Feb. 20 2001
By 
"ripzepplin" (NAPERVILLE, ILLINOIS United States) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Rust Never Sleeps (Audio CD)
I contend that "Comes a Time" from 1978 and "Rust Never Sleeps" from 1979 are one of the best back to back recordings by any rock artist, period! They do everything that rock music was meant to: they make a comment or tell a story, they offer variety in direction and flavor, they create a mood, and they define a period in time, just to name a few of these CDs' qualities. Where "Comes a Time" was more laid back just like the latter mid 70s themselves, "Rust Never Sleeps" keeps one foot on those roots but displays an attitude and relentlessness that accompanied the late 70s/early 80s, not to mention a grungeful flavor of what was too come a bit further down the road. It was Neil at his most playful and most reflective in quite some time. And it was probably Neil's toughest act to follow, as "Reactor" would soon attest. Acoustical gems are "Thrasher" and "Pocohantas", both showing a hunger for simpler times, drawing strong parallels with times past and soon to come. "Sail Away" is a melodic jewel, shining in so many aspects - the perfect compelmenting of acoustic guitar and harmonica, the gorgeous harmonies in the background. "My,my, Hey, hey" works both acoustically and electrically - another influence Young had on MTV, as their future "unplugged" sessions demonstrated. And "Powderfinger" still gives me goosebumps when I listen to it. It's a beautifully written song and performed to perfection. This is one of those solid listens from start to finish. Only Neil seems capable of delivering one extreme to the other and pulling it off so unpretentiously. That's always been the allure of Neil. This period was the zenith for most Neil Young fans. His songs were still from a time and place much different from today, yet had the foresight of what was too come and dealt with it. This CD is second only to "Comes A Time" on my fave Neil CDs list, if only for what I consider "C.A.T.'s" elegence. But scoring a three-peat would prove more difficult, and the more Neil tried after this CD, the more distant his long time fans became. It was fun while it lasted, as this would be Neil's last great recording, at least for quite some time.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars grungey / acoustic, Dec 10 2000
By 
R. Bruynesteyn (Horn Netherlands) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Rust Never Sleeps (Audio CD)
Weld is better in my opinion, but here it is nice to hear the two Neil Youngs (troubadour and grunger) on one disc.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars Neil's best album Ever!!!, Sept. 2 2000
By 
"dokkenfan" (Kansas City, MO United States) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Rust Never Sleeps (Audio CD)
This is just one of those albums that will never grow old for me. While the album contains several standout tracks, namely, the acoustic and electric versions of Hey Hey My My, and the absolutely beautiful Thrasher, its real strength lies in its folw as an album. Just as you begin to grow tired of the softer, acoustic songs that fill the first half of the album, you are greeted by the loud electric guitars of Powderfinger, another Young classic. From this song on, it is nothing but Neil and Crazy Horse jamming on loud, electric numbers. No album better demonstrates Young's talents in acoustic and electric rock. All in all, the album is a great starting point for any new fan, as well as a great addition to any long time fan's collection, although I can't see anybody getting this album just to finish off their Neil Young catalog.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars Rust never sleep, so wake up for Neil Young, Aug. 17 2000
This review is from: Rust Never Sleeps (Audio CD)
This is a live album, recorded on various gigs, with both acoustic and electric songs. The acoustic songs are really relaxing tunes, good compositions and the form a real balance to the electrical stuff ont this album (like Hey hey, Welfare Mothers). If you want to discover two sides of Neil Young, this is the album to have. It shows Neil Young at his best: live, electric and acoustic.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars My favorite Neil and a perfect introduction to his solo work, June 20 2000
By 
Tom Aiken (Southern California) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Rust Never Sleeps (Audio CD)
Disco had the charts, punk rock and new wave had the critics. What could possibly come from dinosaur Neil Young in 1979? Well those who were fortunate enough to see his "Rust Never Sleeps" tour in late 1978 already knew. This album was recorded at various stops on that tour and remains one of rock's finest efforts.
Sometimes reffered to as Neil's "answer" to punk rock, I think of this album more as a tribute. Neil saw punk as the lifeline for rock, which had grown increasingly stagnant over the decade. Accordingly, Neil is more furious and inspired than ever before.
The album is divided into acoustic and electric halfs with neither besting the other. The acoustic songs are gorgeous, lyrically baffling, and quite torrid. "Hey Hey My My" is a stirring song about rock and the music business. "Thrasher" remains Neil's ultimate statement of individuality, while "Pocohontas" revisits his destruction of the Native-Americans motif.
For the flip side Neil adds Crazy Horse and turns out four of his most brutal jams. "Sedan Delivery" is perhaps the closest to actual punk rock, but is the reprise of "Hey Hey My My", now electric. Full of glorious distortion and feedback, the song is an untoppable close to a near perfect album.
Because of its dualistic nature that shows off both Neil's acoustic and electric leanings, I think this is the best record to get acquianted with Neil's legacy.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


Most Helpful First | Newest First

This product

Rust Never Sleeps
Rust Never Sleeps by Neil Young (Audio CD - 1987)
Click for more info
Usually ships in 1 to 2 months
Add to cart Add to wishlist
Only search this product's reviews