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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The album that made Alice Cooper a household name
Billion Dollar Babies (1973.) Alice Cooper's sixth album.
Alice Cooper had released five albums, up to the beginning of 1973, all of which were excellent. From the bizzare-but-still-excellent psychedelic rock of the classic band's debut Pretties For You to the hard and bluesy School's Out, Alice Cooper's band proved to be a damn fine rock and roll quintet that could...
Published on July 2 2004 by Rocker_Man

versus
1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars just leave the record alone
I hate it when they change the song order from what it was on the original LP!!!
Published on May 3 2004


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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The album that made Alice Cooper a household name, July 2 2004
This review is from: Billion Dollar Babies (Audio CD)
Billion Dollar Babies (1973.) Alice Cooper's sixth album.
Alice Cooper had released five albums, up to the beginning of 1973, all of which were excellent. From the bizzare-but-still-excellent psychedelic rock of the classic band's debut Pretties For You to the hard and bluesy School's Out, Alice Cooper's band proved to be a damn fine rock and roll quintet that could cover a plethora of styles. Alice Cooper, Glen Buxton, Dennis Dunaway, Neal Smith, and Michael Bruce had proven their musical genius five times already, and in 1973, the band released Billion Dollar Babies, the album that would grant them their immortal status as rock and roll icons. Is the album overrated, or does it deserve its reputation? Read on for my review.
This album deserves every bit of praise it gets - period. Of the ten songs on the album, five of them went on to become fairly popular. Among the popular songs are the classic rock anthem No More Mr. Nice Guy, which is probably Alice Cooper's biggest hit ever released. And who could forget Elected, Alice classic "I want to be president" song? The song is actually a reworking of a much earlier tune the band released. In my opinion, the original version is better, but this version still rocks. The title track is the true highlight of the album; it's gloomy hard rock as only the Coop could do. And on this track, doing lead vocals with Alice, is none other than sixties pop star Donovan Leitch! Even though this song is basically as "anti-Donovan" sounding as you can get, he does a damn good job on it! The bluesy Generation Landslide is a sequel to the story told in the title track, and it too is excellent. Another fairly popular track is the mini-epic opener, Hello Hurray. It's too bad the band didn't release this song as a single, because I'm pretty sure it would have been a million plus seller. The other five tracks on the album are considerably less popular than these five, but they are no less excellent, for the most part. Raped And Freezin', Sick Things, and I Love The Dead are regular Alice Cooper masterpieces. Even the short little piano-heavy track, Mary Ann, is pretty good. In the end, this stands as one of Alice Cooper's strongest albums. It's no wonder so many fans call it his best and most popular.
In addition to the original CD issue of this album, there is a two-disc deluxe edition available. The deluxe version of the album has the complete original album on disc one, and a hell of a lot of bonus tracks on disc two. The bonus tracks are mostly live concert cuts, but there are a few demos and outtakes as well. The deluxe version costs more than the standard version, but not a whole lot more. Take my advice and shell out the extra cash for the deluxe edition.
Billion Dollar Babies is one of those rock and roll masterpieces that's just so good that it's hard to describe in words. Although not my personal favorite Alice Cooper album (that honor would have to go to 1971's Killer), many fans call it their favorite, and I really can't blame them for doing such. If you're new to Alice Cooper, this should be the first one of his albums that you buy. No classic rock collection is complete without this album - no questions asked.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Best sounding version to date (SACD), Feb. 7 2014
By 
Stephen Bieth (Mississauga/ Canada) - See all my reviews
(TOP 50 REVIEWER)   
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: Billion Dollar Babies (Audio CD)
This is the Alice Cooper bands last great record. They did one more after this but it kind of sucked. This version (The SACD) is by far the best sounding version. Even tops the deluxe version put out about 12 years ago (but you don't get the bonus live CD). Again nice warm bass and great separation. Hopefully they will do all four Alice Cooper's classics (this, Killers, Love it to Death and Schools Out). The songs on this record are some of Alice's best. Raped and Freezing, Billion Dollar Babies, Elected and No More Mr Nice Guy to name but a few. Besides Welcome to My Nightmare solo Alice Cooper never came close to this peak with the Alice Cooper group (The first seven albums were done by the Group Alice Cooper. After that Alice went solo taking the name with him).
This is one of the great Hard Rock/ Glam records of the period. Where Bowie went the spaceman route and Bolan went the pretty boy route Glam in the US was much darker Lou Reed, New York Dolls and Alice Cooper to name a few.
Over all this is a classic and should be checked out by anyone exploring rock. Just an FYI this SACD also plays as a CD that is from the same remaster.
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5.0 out of 5 stars How Long Will The Cardboard Hold Up On This CD Cover, April 25 2004
By 
Joseph McCarthy (Philadelphia, Pennsylvania United States) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Billion Dollar Babies (Audio CD)
I've been waiting so long to write this review. I love Alice Cooper. I love him to death. Billion Dollar Babies starts off with a killer tune, "Hello Hooray." It's an awesome song. But the next one "Raped And Freezin," comes nowhere near to being as good. "Elected" is better than "Raped...," but still not as good as Hello Hooray, and never will be.
The song, "Billion Dollar Babies" is the best rocker on the whole cd. Donovan does an excellent duet with Alice. Over all these years, I never knew it was Donovan singing. I only discovered this from the liner notes and photos, after buying the cd a couple years ago (2002).
"Unfinished Sweet" is one of the throw-away tunes on the album. Naturally, some people like it, but I don't. So there.
In fact, you can dispose of the entire live bonus disc too. Why listen to a cd of inferior quality when you have the same songs with a beautiful studio sound on the original album? Of course, there's three non-live studio cuts at the end of the live disc: "Coal Black Model T (outtake)," "Son Of Billion Dollar Babies (Generation Landslide) (outtake)" and "Slick Black Limousine," two of which are not available on any other Cooper album. But they're not that good anyway. And "Son Of Billion Dollar Babies (Generation Landslide) (outtake)," might sound alright, but why bother with it when you have the same song, "Generation Landslide," on the studio album?
Generation Landslide is a great song. I find it interesting that they didn't include a live cut of it on the live bonus disc. Instead, they gave us a studio outtake of it called Son Of Billion Dollar Babies. But don't worry. If you like the song that much, there's a live version of it on "Special Forces," Alice Cooper's 1981 album. The song title is "Generation Landslide '81 (Live)"
But don't get excited, Special Forces is not a live album. "Generation..." is the only live track on it. And guess what? The song ain't that good. Stick with the Billion Dollar Babies version.
"No More Mr. Nice Guy" is one of the greatest songs on Billion Dollar Babies. Written by Alice Cooper and Michael Bruce, it's no wonder they released it as a single in 1973. I remember playing it on the jukebox almost every time I went into Jolly's, a burger joint on Kensington avenue. "Frankenstien," by Johnny Winters (or was it his brother, the Edgar Winter Group?), was another crowd favorite at the time.
Alice Cooper are a band of sick puppies. You gotta love the song "Sick Things." When he sings "I love you, things, I see - As much as you love me - You things are heavenly when you come worship me." Is he talking about us, his fans?
I love "Mary Ann." Nothing but a solo piano and two minutes of Alice singing in a longing, nostalgic tone. Not a rock and roll song, but still not out of place on the album.
Listen closely to the very beginning of "I Love The Dead." The first few seconds of the song sound almost identical to the biginning of the song "Welcome To My Nightmare." Then as you're listening to the rest of the song, you'll realize that "I Love The Dead" would fit perfectly on the Welcome To My Nightmare album. In fact, the last thirty seconds of this song is classic "...Nightmare" material.
This got me to wondering, just how many of the Welcome To My Nightmare songs did Bob Ezrin already have written in his head before he and Alice dumped the band after the Muscle Of Love album? Who knows? Who even cares? Welcome To My Nightmare is a fantastic album, with or without the old band members. And so is Billion Dollar Babies.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Roll out with your circus freaks and hula hoops!, Dec 23 2003
By 
Pamela Scarangello (Middletown, NJ USA) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Billion Dollar Babies (Audio CD)
1973's "Billion Dollar Babies" is undoubtedly the best record ever to be made by the Alice Cooper band. In this CD, Alice Cooper, Glen Buxton, Dennis Dunaway, Neil Smith, and Michael Bruce painstakingly composed a tracklist that intricately blends hard rock with flamboyant showmanship. In addition, producer Bob Ezrin (who would later play an integral part in Cooper's "Welcome to My Nightmare") added a symphonic touch to this album, tediously incorporating a piano, violins, horns, and trumpets. Alice, meanwhile, wonderfully portrays the spectacle's carny barker; he utters his lyrics with a bold and sarcastic sneer, mocking America's obsession with money and politics. Certainly, no other artist could pull this off with such finesse.
"Raped and Freezin'" is a humorous narrative about a hitchhiker who (after trying to find directions to Santa Fe) is kidnapped by a woman, violated, and then is left stranded in Chihuahua without any clothes on. This song carries plenty of wit, since the main characters' gender roles are reversed. In the simple and direct "Elected," Alice goes on a political campaign to become President of the United States (maybe he'll kick George Bush out of the White House!). Of course, this one track resulted from the hurt and embarrassment of Nixon's Watergate scandal. "Billion Dollar Babies" (sung by Alice and Donovan) is a twisted duet about decadence and debauchery; while comparing a woman to an anatomically correct blow-up doll, the lyrics celebrate the seedy glamour of prostitution and adult films. "Unfinished Sweet" is a diabolical and disjointed track about Alice's trip to the dentist; as the gas makes him unconscious, he participates in a hallucinating mission of espionage with James Bond! In the album's single, "No More Mr. Nice Guy," (a song that would later be covered by Megadeth's Dave Mustaine) Alice revels in his reputation as an obscene rock star; he expresses how proud he is in his flirtation with controversy. "Generation Landslide" mocks the lifestyle of middle-class suburbia; he transforms the American consumer society into a laughing stock. Even the track's two acoustic guitars clink together like coins dropped in a piggy bank! In the chilling "Sick Things," Alice views his fans as sideshow pets. The track's deranged bass rhythm drags like a strongman pulling six Cadillac cars with an iron chain. "Mary Ann" is a romantic piano ballad that will astonish the ears with its sexual irony. Last but not least, "I Love the Dead" is a disturbing, Broadway-style tune about necrophilia. In graphic detail, the lyrics picture a pale, blue corpse staring through its empty eyes. While this is not the first time Alice writes about cinematic horror, "I Love the Dead" foreshadows the coming of "Welcome to My Nightmare," his cadaverous crypt cabaret.
I can guarantee that "Billion Dollar Babies" is worth the money. It's an album suitable for anyone in love with both rock music and the theater. Let the show begin!
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4.0 out of 5 stars One of Alice Cooper's finest, Oct. 3 2003
This review is from: Billion Dollar Babies (Audio CD)
[THIS REVIEW IS FOR THE ORIGINAL VERSION OF THE ALBUM. I HAVE POSTED A SEPARATE REVIEW FOR THE TWO-DISC REMASTERED EDITION. I MAY COMBINE THE TWO EVENTUALLY.]
In 1973, the Alice Cooper band released its sixth album - Billion Dollar Babies. This is the album that would go on to become the band's most popular - and with good reason. It's very rarely a band can shell out a rock and roll album of such quality, but here the Alice Cooper band does it like it's nothing at all. Read on for my review of one of the greatest rock albums of all time - Billion Dollar Babies.
Hello Hooray - This melodic hard rocker opens the album. I can't believe this song never went on to be come a huge hit, because it's quite possibly the best song featured here.
Raped And Freezin' - This is one of the bluesy hard rockers you've come to know and love the Alice Cooper band for. This is a classic example of a song that was never a hit, but should have been.
Elected - An Alice Cooper classic. This song is from the point of view of a man who wishes to become president. It may sound like a weak idea for a song, but the Alice Cooper band pulls it off nicely, and when it's over, you'll be angry at yourself for ever having doubted it!
Billion Dollar Babies - The title track is another one of the Alice Cooper band's classic. This is a straight-up hard rocker, in which Alice Cooper pulls off a pretty good John Lennon impersonation (not sure if that's what he was going for.) This song is more than worthy of all the credit it gets.
Unfinished Sweet - This one's the perfect cross between hard rock and classic rock. Only the Alice Cooper band could evenly mix the styles and make the final result this good.
No More Mr. Nice Guy - Probably the Alice Cooper band's biggest hit, this one's a rocker about a man who goes from good to bad, due to the world around him changing, and not in his favor. To not like this song is the ultimate sin!
Generation Landslide - This one's a follow-up to the story told in the album's title track, though the stylings used in the two songs are quite different (this one is a bit more on the classic rock side than the hard rock side.) Another excellent track.
Sick Things - If the title didn't give it away, this is one of the tracks in which Alice gets in touch with his deranged side. It's a slow and gloomy hard rocker that any fan of Alice is sure to live.
Mary Ann - Here we've got a piano-heavy ballad. Normally, I'm not a big fan of tracks like this, but somehow, the Alice Cooper band manages to pull them off very well!
I Love The Dead - This sounds almost like a cross between the last two tracks, believe it or not. The oddest thing is that fusing the piano with Alice's deranged side actually works out pretty well!
Overall this is an excellent album. But before you buy it, be aware of your options. There are two versions of the album avaialble - The old one, which is single disc, or the new one, which is double disc (the second disc is all bonus material). The one with the second disc costs a little more, but I suggest shelling out the few extra bucks. Whatever version you buy, Billion Dollar Babies is a rock and roll masterpiece, worthy of a place in your rock and roll CD collection.
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5.0 out of 5 stars A Billion Dollar Masterpiece!, April 1 2003
By 
Sean Parauka (Orange, CT United States) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Billion Dollar Babies (Audio CD)
After The Alice Cooper Band released the massively successful "School's Out" in 1972, in 1973 they returned to the studio to record another masterpiece which they did. This album, "Billion Dollar Babies" is another genuine masterpiece. This album shows the band at their prime.
The opener, "Hello! Horray!" is a song about the fans and the concerts. The lyrics are so powerful in how Alice is singing. The lyrics go like "Hello! Horray! Let the show begin. I've been ready. Hello! Horray! Let the lights grow dim. I've been ready. Ready as this audience that's coming here to dream." This song is a classic. Another good classic is "Elected". The song is about presidential elections. It has a good anthem, a good chorus. "I'm your choice. I wanna be Elected. I'm your yankee doodle dandy in a gold Rolls Royce. I wanna be Elected. We're all gonna rock to the rules I make. I wanna be Elected, Elected, Elected."
The title track, "Billion Dollar Babies" is a cool, trashy, and sexy anthem. It starts out with a banging drum beat and then a guitar solo and Alice kick in with, "Billion Dollar Baby. Rubber little lady, slicker than a weasel. Grimy as an alley. Loves me like no other. Billion Dollar Baby. Rotten little monster, baby, I adore you. Man or woman living couldn't love me like you, baby." A hard-core anthem, "No More Mr. Nice Guy" is a really good anthem that has excellent guiatr riffs. "I used to be such a sweet, sweet thing. 'Til they got a hold of me. I opened doors for little old ladies. I helped the blind to see. I got no friends 'cause they read the papers. They can't be seen with me and I'm gettin' real shot down. And I'm feeling mean. No more Mister Nice Guy. No more Mister Clean. No more Mister Nice Guy. They say he's sick, he's obscene."
The great "Generation Landslide" is one of th best songs of the album. It has Michael Bruce doing the acoutic guitars and Glen Buxton doing the electric guitars. Those two different sounds made a great mix. Very catchy lyrics, and an easy-going rythem. The last track, "I Love The Dead" is a scary song that made Alice even more scarier. Some lyrics like, "I love the dead before they're cold. Their blueing flesh for me to hold. Cadaver eyes upon me see nothing. I love the dead before they rise. No farewells, no goodbyes. I never even knew your now-rotting face. While friends and lovers mourn your silly grave. I have other uses for you, Darling. I Love The Dead."
This is next album in your Alice Cooper collection. See The Alice Cooper Band at their best. IT IS A BILLION DOLLAR MASTERPIECE!!!
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5.0 out of 5 stars Fond Memories..., March 27 2003
By 
Jahlon "HelloHelloHello" (LocalSuperCluster [UNI-1]) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Billion Dollar Babies (Audio CD)
Rev. Stang's reference to Alice Cooper's "I Love the Dead" from
Billion Dollar Babies (1973) really brought back some very warm
memories. This album came out when I was 11 and I instantly fell in
love with EVERY song. My Dad even acquired this Alice Cooper
store-display-type thing from the local record store that we put up on
the wall in my Music Room (it was heavy cardboard and it looked just
like the album cover...I
had a little Music Room when I was a kid. It was an un-used bedroom,
actually. We transformedit into a Music Room where my friends and I
could go and shut the door and turn up my old RCA stereo as loud as it
would go. AND WE DANCED, TOO. We decorated all the walls with "music
posters" (mostly ones we made from scratch on construction paper). But
we had some REAL ones in there too. And the giant BDB cardboard
store-display-type thing was the coolest!
I remember that it took my Mom quite a while to get used to the things
she was hearing off Billion Dollar Babies. Maybe she should thought an
11-year old (this was 1973, mind you) shouldn't be listening to such
GHOULISH music. Anyway, she eventually caved and actually let us pump
the music into the foyer during the following Halloween to scare the
kids that came to the house for candy. Billion Dollar Babies was my
favorite album - for years! It's still in my Top 20. And "Sick Things"
was my favorite song:
Sick things in cars rotate 'round my stars.
Sick things, my things, my pets, my things.
I love you things I see, as much as you love me,
You things are heavenly, when you come worship me.
You things are chilled with fright for I am out tonight.
You fill me with delight, you whet my appetite.
I eat my things,
What love it brings,
Come here, my things,
Don't fear my little things.
I love you things I see, as much as you love me,
You things are heavenly, when you come worship me.
You things are thrilled with fright for I am out tonight.
You things are paradise, you whet my appetite.
Sick things in cartridge tapes, my stars,
Sick things, pretty things, play things, my things.
I love the things I see, as much as they love me,
You things are heavenly, when you come worship me.
You things are chilled with fright for I am out tonight.
You things are paradise, you whet my appetite.
[snip]
Thanks for the trigger, Stang!!
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5.0 out of 5 stars Fond Memories..., March 27 2003
By 
Jahlon "HelloHelloHello" (LocalSuperCluster [UNI-1]) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Billion Dollar Babies (Audio CD)
Rev. Stang's reference to Alice Cooper's "I Love the Dead" from
Billion Dollar Babies (1973) really brought back some very warm
memories. This album came out when I was 11 and I instantly fell in
love with EVERY song. My Dad even acquired this Alice Cooper
store-display-type thing from the local record store that we put up on
the wall in my Music Room (it was heavy cardboard and it looked just
like the album cover ...). I
had a little Music Room when I was a kid. It was an un-used bedroom,
actually. We transformed it into a Music Room where my friends and I
could go and shut the door and turn up my old RCA stereo as loud as it
would go. AND WE DANCED, TOO. We decorated all the walls with "music
posters" (mostly ones we made from scratch on construction paper). But
we had some REAL ones in there too. And the giant BDB cardboard
store-display-type thing was the coolest!
I remember that it took my Mom quite a while to get used to the things
she was hearing off Billion Dollar Babies. Maybe she should thought an
11-year old (this was 1973, mind you) shouldn't be listening to such
GHOULISH music. Anyway, she eventually caved and actually let us pump
the music into the foyer during the following Halloween to scare the
kids that came to the house for candy. Billion Dollar Babies was my
favorite album - for years! It's still in my Top 20. And "Sick Things"
was my favorite song:
Sick things in cars rotate 'round my stars.
Sick things, my things, my pets, my things.
I love you things I see, as much as you love me,
You things are heavenly, when you come worship me.
You things are chilled with fright for I am out tonight.
You fill me with delight, you whet my appetite.
I eat my things,
What love it brings,
Come here, my things,
Don't fear my little things.
I love you things I see, as much as you love me,
You things are heavenly, when you come worship me.
You things are thrilled with fright for I am out tonight.
You things are paradise, you whet my appetite.
Sick things in cartridge tapes, my stars,
Sick things, pretty things, play things, my things.
I love the things I see, as much as they love me,
You things are heavenly, when you come worship me.
You things are chilled with fright for I am out tonight.
You things are paradise, you whet my appetite.
[snip]
Thanks for the trigger, Stang!!!
The Stull Demon
Stull Road
Stull, KS 666xx
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5.0 out of 5 stars Still Babies after all these years, Jan. 25 2003
By 
Tim Brough "author and music buff" (Springfield, PA United States) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Billion Dollar Babies (Audio CD)
"Billion Dollar Babies" was the final all out blast of the original Alice Cooper Group, and it was also the band at the peak of their powers. All the elemnets the group had explored on the three albums prior to this were merged to create the ultimate in 70's outrage. The theatrical sweep of "School's Out," the jamming rock of "Killer," the cocksure attitude of "Love It To Death" coalesced in one huge flashy glittery mascara smeared moment of glory, with Alice and his cohorts taking no prisoners.
The showy opener of "Hello Hooray" turns in notice that the band was aware of their love'em or hate'em status in the pop culture of the time, and sly pokes of "Elected" and "No More Mr. Nice Guy" take the same knowledge and riff rock it into stone. The staged crazy antics of "I Love the Dead" and "Unfinished Sweet" managed to make the shocking and the screwy play side by side. (Who else but Alice could make us fear a routine trip to the dentist as much as the necrophilia and the Grim Reaper?)
The repackage is worth every extra penny. Bob Ezrin was the guiding hand behind taming Alice Cooper's mayhem into something that would translate into a recordable and understandable form, and he was also smart enough to add embellishments that put the theatrical into the shock. (note the lush horns and strings in "I Love the Dead," or the piano sound in "Mary Ann.") The remaster finally brings these expert touches to life, reminding us again just how ahead of the curve this pairing was.
The "Billion Dollar Babies" bonus disc is a treat as well, giving us live snap-shots on the entire album and a pair of outtakes that prove that, at their moment of creative peak, the Alice Cooper Group had the pulse of the time down pat. (Bob Dylan even said that he wished he'd written "Generation Landsilide.") Put that with the reproduced pics and "Money" poster, an expanded cd booklet, and this is the must own version of a seventies landmark.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Who Needs "The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame?", Nov. 19 2002
By 
Woodland Drive (Chicago, IL United States) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Billion Dollar Babies (Audio CD)
Let's skip the blather, shall we? "Billion Dollar Babies" stands shoulder to shoulder with the greatest rock albums of all time. Period.
As for Warner Bros./Rhino's 2-disc deluxe re-issue of this landmark album, it is a joy to hear and behold. Not only are we treated to re-mastered sound on the original classic album (thank you again, Mr. Ezrin), Warner Bros. has finally opened their vaults and unleashed an (almost) complete live concert on the second disc. Recorded in Houston and Dallas on April 28 & 29, 1973, "The Billion Dollar Babies Show starring Alice Cooper" is presented in the original running order, with all it's rock 'n' roll roughness intact. (This reviewer was lucky enough to have seen the Coopers on that tour 3 weeks earlier in Pittsburgh, and, after having seen hundreds of concerts since, this show STILL ranks as one of the best ever.) No doubt recorded by Warner Bros. with an eye toward a live release back in the day, the sound is as good as any live recording from the period - full, sharp mix, with all band members clear and present, including guest keyboardist Bob Dolin and "shadow" guitarist Mick Mashbir (sorry, Glen!) Alice himself sounds more raw here than on the studio recordings, and, even though they were just about the biggest act in the world at the time, the band still conveyed a sense of sexual menace in concert (a mood unfortunately lost as Alice embarked on his solo career the following year.)
Why 4 stars instead of 5? To tweak Warner Bros. for their frustrating omission of the final 2 songs from the "BDB Show." The live concert, as presented on this release, concludes with "I Love The Dead." However, the original show featured Alice rising again to sing "School's Out," and following with an encore of "Under My Wheels."
Yes, they had to make room for the additional demo and outtake tracks included here. "Slick Black Limousine," already available on the box set, (and originally released as a flexi-disc insert in England's "New Musical Express") is of interest to aficionados. However, "Slick" is a half-finished musical idea, and was rightly left off the final release of BDB. As for the inclusion of even rougher demos of "Slick" and "Generation Landslide," Cooper-holics will want to hear these - ONCE. Then they, like me, will wish Warners had instead been able to squeeze in the remainder of the live show.
The album's original fold-over wallet design is replicated in good, old-fashioned cardboard, with a few adjustments. This new package folds out twice to reveal 2 discs, both of which feature the original Warner Bros. logo, typeface and green-colored label. A booklet is included containing the original art from the LP's inner sleeve, extensive liner notes and more b&w photos from the era. The color photos from the original LP's inner jacket are here, albeit postage stamp sized. And, just like the original, they're perforated for removal, if desired! Now, in the original LP design, once a hungry Cooper fan removed those photos, underneath were revealed the liner notes for the album. The boo-boo with this CD release is that those original liner notes are here . . . but they're printed on the BACK of the perforated picture panel. And, there is no way to read them, unless the photos are removed (o.k., you can peek down the sleeve and recognize the old printing, but what were Warners/ Rhino thinking?) If you can't resist poking out the pictures, be aware that you'll be staring at a plain field of green in their place, while the backs of the mini-photos will comprise a puzzle of jumbled liner notes!
The only other design disappointment is the absence of the paper billion dollar bill, featuring the band's photo in the middle. Here, the bill is integrated into the print design of the inner-jacket.
My gripes over design and the choice of bonus songs are minor ones. This 2-disc release of "Billion Dollar Babies" is a wonderful package, and a godsend to long-time fans who knew . . . just KNEW . . . that Warner Bros. had a '73 show tucked away. Thank you, Warner Bros. and Rhino, for doing this classic album, and this classic band, justice.
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