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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Delicate Musical Tension
Before The Wall, before Wish You Were Here, before Dark Side Of The Moon, before Meddle, before David Gilmour, there was the magical, psychedelic masterpiece that was Piper At The Gates of Dawn. An album which captures Pink Floyd at its most experimental and challenging, Piper At The Gates of Dawn embraces the essence and pushes the limitations of the psychedelic sound...
Published on July 8 2004 by KB

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3.0 out of 5 stars Respect should be given, but....
There are always those shocker debut albums. You know, the ones by bands you like that you pick up without having prior knowledge that they had a different lineup and a completely different sound. Bands that come to mind are Peter Green-era Fleetwood Mac, who where a straight ahead all-male British blues band; Iron Maiden, who where much more punk prior to being heavy...
Published on April 6 2004 by Rob Walsh


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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Delicate Musical Tension, July 8 2004
By 
KB (Lawrence, KS) - See all my reviews
This review is from: The Piper at the Gates of Dawn (Audio CD)
Before The Wall, before Wish You Were Here, before Dark Side Of The Moon, before Meddle, before David Gilmour, there was the magical, psychedelic masterpiece that was Piper At The Gates of Dawn. An album which captures Pink Floyd at its most experimental and challenging, Piper At The Gates of Dawn embraces the essence and pushes the limitations of the psychedelic sound. Written almost entirely by guitarist Syd Barret, whose penchant for wild and reckless experimentation extended far beyond the purely musical, Piper At The Gates Of Dawn takes on a life wholly independent of other Pink Floyd albums.
It is a difficult, almost feral, album filled with songs that project a view of the world that is almost childish in its naiivety, and yet, at the same time, maintains a very dark, menacing edginess. It is an album which manages, somehow a very delicate tension between the whimsical and the sinister, a tension which, perhaps, reflects the personal turmoil of Syd Barret himself.
Tough to say what might have transpired had Barret not lost the edge. Perhaps his psychological collapse (brought about by the over-use of psychotropic drugs), was necessitated by the nature of the art he created: a brilliance not made to last, like a star going nova. Conjecture aside, Piper At The Gates of Dawn remains a unique artistic statement, wholly unlike anything that would be produced by the subsequent incarnation of the group following Barret's departure. It is an album which captures, in a very real way, the nature and essence of psychedelic music, and may in fact be the best Pink Floyd album.
[NOTE: for the casual Floyd fan, the incarnation of the band present on Piper At The Gates Of Dawn is the Pink Floyd you know and love in title alone. Consequently, Piper At The Gates Of Dawn make take some getting used to, particularly for those either unfamiliar with late 60's psychedelic rock or those expecting a Darkside-esque album.]
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The First Floyd, June 30 2004
By 
Alan Caylow (USA) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: The Piper at the Gates of Dawn (Audio CD)
1967's "The Piper At The Gates Of Dawn" is the one that started it all for Pink Floyd, back in the early days when bassist Roger Waters, keyboardist Richard Wright & drummer Nick Mason were led by the genius, but doomed singer/guitarist Syd Barrett. Psychedelic rock doesn't get much more trippier than "Piper," a totally far-out collection of avant-garde space rock, songs about gnomes and scarecrows, off-the-wall production and sound effects, and superb performances by a tight British art-rock band that were destined to become Rock 'N' Roll Hall Of Famers.Although he made one last "cameo" appearance with the Floyd on their second album, "A Saucerful Of Secrets" with that album's closing number, "Jugband Blues," the lion's share of Syd Barrett's legacy with the band is all contained right here on "Piper," barring a few early singles. Writing all but one song, and, with a charismatic singing voice and incredible guitar-playing skills, Barrett was truly a musical genius, and his equally-talented bandmates match him song for song. Every track on the album is a highlight in it's own right, but certainly worth mentioning are such tracks as the opening space rock of "Astronomy Domine," the before-there-was-alternative alternative rock of "Lucifer Sam," the far-out instrumentals "Pow R Toc H" and "Interstellar Overdrive," the frenetic rock of "Take Up Thy Stethoscope And Walk" (written & sung by Waters, in his debut composition for the band), the charming tale of "The Gnome," and the classic, half children's song/half freak-out finale, "Bike," which starts out cheerily enough before giving way to some deliciously wacko noises and sound effects.Sadly, and tragically, shortly after the release of "Piper," Syd Barrett's experimentations with psychedelic drugs ultimately destroyed him, and he was finally ousted from the band. Roger Waters more-or-less took over as the group's leader, and Barrett's vacated slot was filled by guitarist David Gilmour. Barrett, despite his drug-addicted state, would record a pair of solo albums before dropping out of the music business altogether. Not well enough to look after himself, he's been quietly living in the care of family members ever since. Pink Floyd, meanwhile, would go on to major superstardom and sell millions of albums, with such classics as "Dark Side Of The Moon," "Wish You Were Here," "Animals" and "The Wall." But "The Piper At The Gates Of Dawn" was the band's very first chapter, and one that would not have been possible without the great Syd Barrett. "Piper" is outstanding psychedelic rock, and a Pink Floyd classic. And thank you, Syd, wherever you are.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Far from floyd but closer than you think!, Sept. 3 2006
This review is from: The Piper at the Gates of Dawn (Audio CD)
As a budding Pink Floyd fan, I got this album a few months ago as maybe the fourth after getting the mid 70s albums I knew. I heard it was genious and Syd Barrett was amazing on it. Well I bought it and 13 others. Syd gave the music a poetic stance that the band lost after while, still my favorite but hearing the band experiment and then find the sound with Meddle is awesome. This album is fantastic but it takes some open mindedness and getting used to for the main stream Floyd fan. Give it a chance and you will not be dissapointed.

Shine on Syd, you Piper and Painter!
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5.0 out of 5 stars The birth of Pink Floyd starts here, June 20 2004
By 
Terrence J Reardon "Classic rock guru" (Lake Worth, Florida, USA) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: The Piper at the Gates of Dawn (Audio CD)
In August of 1967, Pink Floyd released their debut album The Piper at the Gates of Dawn in the UK and a month later in the US as The Pink Floyd. This was the first introduction to a band that would conquer the world in a few years time. The band consisted of bassist Roger Waters, drummer Nick Mason(credited as Nicky on this album's original sleeve), keyboardist Rick Wright and guitarist/vocalist and main songwriter Syd Barrett, whom was the mad genius of the band. The members of the band were in groups known as The Abdabs, The Megadeaths and The T-Set among others until Syd hooked up with childhood friend Roger and Roger's architectural school classmates Rick and Nick and another friend Bob Close to form the group The Pink Floyd which was named after two old Georgia bluesmen Pink Anderson and Floyd Council. Bob Close left after recording Syd's demo of Lucy Leave. Throughout 1966, the band were a concert sensation in London's underground music movement and proceeded to get a deal with EMI in Europe and was signed to EMI's US affiliate Capitol under the subsidary Tower(way before the record chain existed). The band's first two singles were Arnold Layne and See Emily Play which were both Top 20 hits in England. Then, the group's entered Abbey Road Studios to record their debut sometime in March of 1967 with producer Norman Smith, whom worked with The Beatles from 1962-65. Ironically, The Beatles were in the same building finishing their classic contribution to rock history Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band. All but one track on Piper was written or co-written by Syd Barrett. His songs were whimsical works of art. The original UK album started with Astronomy Domine, which was about going into space to explore the universe(strangely this song was eliminated off of the original American vinyl release). Next is Lucifer Sam, a tale about a Siamese cat. Matilda Mother and Flaming(which was also left off of the original US vinyl release) follow and are great songs. Next is the first of two instrumentals Pow R Toc H which grabs the attention. Next was Roger Waters' first song written for the band Take Up Thy Stethoscope and Walk which is a silly song with some excellent jamming. The second half starts with Interstellar Overdrive which was a number the band had played live before signing with EMI and was written by the band. The Gnome follows and is about a gnome named Grimble Crumble. Chapter 24 follows and is my favorite Syd track. The Scarecrow follows and is a funny song. The album concludes with the whimsical Bike(also left off the original US vinyl release in favor of See Emily Play) which then turns into a collage of sound effects and duck-call noises. The album showed Syd at his best before LSD caused his behavior to become erratic and unpredictable and his songwriting skills started to go down the drain. The US version of the album hit the lower reaches of the Billboard Top 200 while the UK version hit #6 in England and the UK version would eventually be released in the US on the double album A Nice Pair in 1973 and properly on CD on its owm in 1987. The CD sounds better now with the remastering done in 1994 by James Guthrie. Excellent start to an outstanding career.
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5.0 out of 5 stars There's just something really addicting about this album, June 12 2004
This review is from: The Piper at the Gates of Dawn (Audio CD)
I will admit that back in 1991, when I first bought this CD -- used -- at the theft-prone "Positively Records" in Fairless Hills, PA I wasn't exactly impressed. I'd just gotten into the Floyd a year or so earlier, with my first tapes (yes, tapes) purchased being The Wall and A Momentary Lapse of Reason, both of which were very listener-friendly. And so after seeing some guy in my high school wearing a T-shirt with "Pink Floyd: The Piper at the Gates of Dawn" on it, I found the album's title to be so compelling that I went out later that day and bought it.
But I was a neophyte Floyd fan -- I didn't even know who Syd Barrett was, so I had no idea what to expect when I gave it my first listen. "Astronomy Domine" sounded Floydian enough, I suppose, with background sound effects and such, but upon advancing to track 2, "Lucifer Sam," I was a bit dumbfounded. What *was* this crap? What kind of lyric is "Black cat something I can't explain" when I'd just gotten so used to phrases that made sense like "We don't need no education" and "The sweet smell of a great sorrow lies over the land"?
I skipped to track 3. "Matilda Mother," which was rather pleasing to listen to, although the last verse just comes up rather abruptly -- was this just bad editing? I don't know.
I ended up skipping through each song, hoping to find some big epic song with a grand orchestral entrance or something, but the childlike nature of the song just didn't sit well with me at the time. This was "Pink Floyd"? My, how things had changed from 1967 to the time "Momentary Lapse" had come out in 1987! I did find "Bike" to be absolutely hilarious and therefore was, at the time, the album's saving grace, even though it still didn't sound like the Floyd I knew.
But then again, I really knew very little about pop/rock music in general. My conservative parents really didn't let me listen to anything popular because it was "the devil's music." (You shoulda seen it when my dad took my tape of the Dead Milkmen's "Metaphysical Graffiti" and smashed it under his foot in the kitchen). So I learned the melodies of pop music through listening to "Weird Al" Yankovic, which my parents seemed to have no problem with. So it goes without saying that I didn't know anything about British music, especially all that psychedelic stuff from the 1960s, like this "Piper" album.
So after getting tired of listening to "Bike" over and over, I kept this album on the shelf and didn't listen to it again until after I got to see Pink Floyd come and play at Veterans Stadium in 1994. By that time I'd amassed a fair collection of Floyd albums like "Animals," "Dark Side," "Meddle," as well as the new "Division Bell" album, which I thought was actually pretty decent. But anyway, so when the show started, what did Floyd open up with? "Astronomy Domine" of all things!! I was just floored. Granted, this was a more up-tempo version of the song, but I suddenly felt completely different about the "Piper" album. Apparently the Floyd recognized how underrated Syd Barrett's material was, and thus made the ballsy move of opening the show with a song that no fair-weather Floyd fan would recognize. Go Pink Floyd!!
The next day, after school, I dusted off "Piper" and listened to it in its entirety. This was some pretty amazing stuff after all... something was really really compelling about these works by Syd Barrett. Who *was* this guy? And why wasn't he in the band? Eventually I became so obsessed with the Floyd that I bought every studio album within a year or so after I'd been to that Floyd show at the Vet (R.I.P.). I then really began to get a better understanding of all this "psychedelic rock" music (which all seemed to come out of Britain for some reason -- but then, so did Monty Python), and then after I started listening to the band called Phish, I began to appreciate free-form, improvised music so much more.
And now, in 2004, after being exposed to just about every musical genre imaginable, I still find "Piper" to be a fantastic album that stands the test of time. "Flaming" is such a lovely and haunting song... it has now even replaced "Bike" as my favorite song on the album, and perhaps is on my top 5 Floyd songs of all time. It is no wonder that people have become so curious about the legendary Syd Barrett, and wondering what exactly was going through his brain as he wrote this stuff. It's the stuff of genius, no doubt. It's hardly conventional music -- and hardly conventional Pink Floyd music, for that matter -- but that's why it's so interesting.
So my suggestion to you is this: if the only Floyd you know is "Dark Side," "WYWH," and "The Wall," then you should know that you have to listen to a Floyd album in its entirely to get the full effect. That's just how it's meant to be. "Piper" is no different in that respect, although it doesn't follow the familiar "concept album" framework -- the songs on "Piper" have no underlying theme. It's just Barrett's crazy brain sending some kind of weird signal to his writing/playing hand. But no matter -- just block out about 45 minutes of your time and listen to this entire album from beginning to end, with no interruptions. I am confident that, in time, you'll find that you can't live without this album, because it's like a drug, an addiction, that you can't (or won't want to) break free from.
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5.0 out of 5 stars All I need to live is this album and a supply of bread, May 21 2004
By 
Anton Dolinsky (Henderson, NV) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: The Piper at the Gates of Dawn (Audio CD)
Almost any random five seconds of this album is better than the life work of most musicians, and contains more musical ideas. This be a thickly packed album, mates. Turning the volume as high as it will allow itself to go, I notice beautiful dense intersections of organ, bass, voice, guitar, drum, and sound effect filling every fraction of a second like the tangles of a fractal. I can listen to Piper at any scale I want to--grooving to the general sound of a song brings out one thing, but paying attention to the details brings out seventeen different new songs. There are as many songs in this album as you have time to notice, because the album is a well connected play of genius like almost nothing I've ever heard.
Syd Barrett sounds like he's molesting his guitar, and his style is like something developed in seclusion from all previous currents of music. I guess I could call it proto-space-funk-on-speed, and I like it more than Hendrix. But the two famous guitarists are different. Hendrix, to me, is best for those strange little passages that come out of nowhere, sometimes, in his solos, creating a brief musical world of strangely organic, "dripping" melody and rhythm that never was before and never will be again. Barrett is a wizard who uses his guitar to create endlessly inventive un-musical sounds, but layers these sounds together in a frenzied and pounding way that somehow wonderfully makes them into music. Well--I guess they're not that much different. Barrett's weird, like listening to a flamenco player with a third hand in the middle of an electrified mental breakdown. But enough of that. He's gorgeous.
Meanwhile Wright, the organ player, puts down the moods necessary and achieves some astonishing beauties that last just long enough to make me care and just briefly enough to make me miss them after they pass, especially on Matilda Mother and Pow R Toc H. The drums whack and boom as if they were inside your skull. The bass scares. And the lyrics are about flowers, stories, trips, clouds, hide and seek, madness, paranoia, space, and everything cool. Astronomy Domine balances space gitarr w/ powerfully smooth celestial organ flows. Interstellar Overdrive should be played in the cockpit of the space shuttle as it takes off. And there's a song about a cat which is wicked.
Hope I've turned more people on to the Piper.
Please send bread. I'm hungry.
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5.0 out of 5 stars The birth of Pink Floyd starts here, May 13 2004
By 
Terrence J. Reardon (South Carolina and Mass., USA) - See all my reviews
This review is from: The Piper at the Gates of Dawn (Audio CD)
In August of 1967, Pink Floyd released their debut album The Piper at the Gates of Dawn in the UK and a month later in the US as The Pink Floyd. This was the first introduction to a band that would conquer the world in a few years time. The band consisted of bassist Roger Waters, drummer Nick Mason(credited as Nicky on this album's original sleeve), keyboardist Rick Wright and guitarist/vocalist and main songwriter Syd Barrett, whom was the mad genius of the band. The members of the band were in groups known as The Abdabs, The Megadeaths and The T-Set among others until Syd hooked up with childhood friend Roger and Roger's architectural school classmates Rick and Nick and another friend Bob Close to form the group The Pink Floyd which was named after two old Georgia bluesmen Pink Anderson and Floyd Council. Bob Close left after recording Syd's demo of Lucy Leave. Throughout 1966, the band were a concert sensation in London's underground music movement and proceeded to get a deal with EMI in Europe and was signed to EMI's US affiliate Capitol under the subsidary Tower(way before the record chain existed). The band's first two singles were Arnold Layne and See Emily Play which were both Top 20 hits in England. Then, the group's entered Abbey Road Studios to record their debut sometime in March of 1967 with producer Norman Smith, whom worked with The Beatles from 1962-65. Ironically, The Beatles were in the same building finishing their classic contribution to rock history Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band. All but one track on Piper was written or co-written by Syd Barrett. His songs were whimsical works of art. The original UK album started with Astronomy Domine, which was about going into space to explore the universe(strangely this song was eliminated off of the original American vinyl release). Next is Lucifer Sam, a tale about a Siamese cat. Matilda Mother and Flaming(which was also left off of the original US vinyl release) follow and are great songs. Next is the first of two instrumentals Pow R Toc H which grabs the attention. Next was Roger Waters' first song written for the band Take Up Thy Stethoscope and Walk which is a silly song with some excellent jamming. The second half starts with Interstellar Overdrive which was a number the band had played live before signing with EMI and was written by the band. The Gnome follows and is about a gnome named Grimble Crumble. Chapter 24 follows and is my favorite Syd track. The Scarecrow follows and is a funny song. The album concludes with the whimsical Bike(also left off the original US vinyl release in favor of See Emily Play) which then turns into a collage of sound effects and duck-call noises. The album showed Syd at his best before LSD caused his behavior to become erratic and unpredictable and his songwriting skills started to go down the drain. The US version of the album hit the lower reaches of the Billboard Top 200 while the UK version hit #6 in England and the UK version would eventually be released in the US on the double album A Nice Pair in 1973 and properly on CD on its owm in 1987. The CD sounds better now with the remastering done in 1994 by James Guthrie. Excellent start to an outstanding career.
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5.0 out of 5 stars The birth of Pink Floyd 37 years on, May 13 2004
By 
Terrence J. Reardon (South Carolina and Mass., USA) - See all my reviews
This review is from: The Piper at the Gates of Dawn (Audio CD)
In August of 1967, Pink Floyd released their debut album The Piper at the Gates of Dawn. This was the world's first introduction to a band that would conquer the world in a few years time. On this album, the band consisted of bassist Roger Waters, drummer Nick Mason, keyboardist Rick Wright and guitarist/vocalist and main songwriter Syd Barrett, whom was the arguable genius of the band at the time. The members of the band were in groups known as The Abdabs, The Megadeaths and The T-Set among others until Syd hooked up with childhood friend Roger and Roger's architectural school classmates Rick and Nick and another friend Bob Close to form the group The Pink Floyd Sound which was named after two old Georgia bluesmen Pink Anderson and Floyd Council. Bob Close left after recording Syd's demo of Lucy Leave. Throughout 1966, the band were a sensation in London's underground music movement and proceeded to get a deal with EMI in Europe and was signed to EMI's US affiliate Capitol under the subsidary Tower(way before the record chain existed). The band's first two singles were Arnold Layne and See Emily Play which were both Top 20 hits in England. Then, the group's entered Abbey Road Studios to record their debut sometime in March of 1967 with producer Norman Smith, whom worked with The Beatles from 1962-65. Ironically, The Beatles were in the same building finishing their classic contribution to rock history Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band. All but one track were written or co-written by Syd. His songs were whimsical works of art. The original UK album started with Astronomy Domine, which was about going into space to explore the universe(strangely this song was eliminated off of the original American vinyl release). Next is Lucifer Sam, a tale about a Siamese cat. Matilda Mother and Flaming(which was also left off of the original US vinyl release) follow and are great songs. Next is the first of two instrumentals Pow R Toc H which grabs the attention. Next was Roger Waters' first song written for the band Take Up Thy Stethoscope and Walk which is a silly song with some excellent jamming. The second half starts with Interstellar Overdrive which was a number the band had played live before signing with EMI and was written by the band. The Gnome follows and is about a gnome named Grimble Crumble. Chapter 24 follows and is my favorite Syd track. The Scarecrow follows and is a funny song. The album concludes with the whimsical Bike(also left off the original US vinyl release in favor of See Emily Play) which then turns into a collage of sound effects and duck-call noises. The album showed Syd at his best before LSD caused his behavior to become erratic and unpredictable and his songwriting started to go down the drain. The US version of the album hit the lower reaches of the Billboard Top 200 whilst the UK version hit #6 in England. The UK version was eventually released in the US on the double album A Nice Pair in 1973 and properly on CD on its own in 1987. The CD sounds better now with the remastering done in 1994 by James Guthrie. Excellent start to an outstanding career.
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5.0 out of 5 stars An underrated classic, May 1 2004
The Piper at the Gates of Dawn (1967.) Pink Floyd's first album.
These days, we widely recognize Pink Floyd as classic rock legends, mostly because of the success of their 1973 album, Dark Side Of The moon. Because of this, most people tend to overlook the band's material that was released before that album. The band actually released their debut album in 1967! The band, who took its name from blues musicians Pink Anderson and Floyd Council, at this point consisted of Syd Barrett on lead guitar and vocals, Roger Waters on bass guitar and vocals, Richard Wright on organ and piano, and Nick Mason on drums. How does the band's 1967 debut album, Piper at the Gates of Dawn, measure up? Read on for my review.
The band starts the album off with Astronomy Domine. This song has gone on to become a fan favorite. As the title may have implied, this one is a premonition to their future successes. The intro to this song, with beeping noises and Barrett's guitar, is priceless. Track number two is Lucifer Sam. Here the band goes for the sound a number of other rock bands were going for in the sixties. This one bares little resemblance to the Pink Floyd that most people know and love, but it's still an excellent song. Next up, we have Matilda Mother. The vocals here are some of the best on the album. This is melodic rock at its very best. Flaming is next in the album's line up. This one sounds like a cross between the previous two tracks, in that it combines elements of melodic rock and sixties mainstream rock. This makes for a rather interesting listening experience. The album's fifth track is the (rather bizzarely titled) Pow R. Toc H. This track is strange (both in name and musical stylings), but it's still excellent. The drums sound better here than on any other track of the album. Number six is Take Up Thy Stethoscope And Walk (man, these guys had a thing for weird song titles!) In this track, the organ is the main instrument - and Richard Wright does his job very well. Combine his organ-playing excellence with Syd Barrett's guitar playing and you get another excellent track. Interstellar Overdrive is an instrumental, and one of the tracks on the album that tends to get the most praise. In the nine minute plus instrumental, the band explores a plethora of styles, and each member of the band really gets a chance to shine. Don't overlook this gem. The Gnome and Scarecrow are some of the more pop-sounding tracks on the album, but that doesn't mean they're bad ones. They've got catchy tunes and lyrics, with the overall style of the former track being similar to that used by Herman's Hermits. And then we have Chapter 24. This is another slower and more melodic tune, as only these guys could do. The "chanting" lyric style makes for a very memorable tune. Bike finishes the album off. This is another very pop-sounding track. Once again, the band has managed to create a song with a catchy tune and lyrics. It sounds NOTHING like the Pink Floyd most people know and love, but it's still excellent. All in all, this is one hell of an album.
I should probably point out that there were a few tracks the band recorded in this era and released as singles, but these tracks never made it on to any album. Among these was the fairly popular See Emily Play. I was hoping when they reissued this album they would include some of these songs as bonus tracks, but sadly, they didn't. Oh well, I'm not taking away any stars - the album itself is too good.
Overall, Pink Floyd's debut album is a very good one, although it is very different from their "cosmic" seventies rock that most fans have come to know them for. If you like Pink Floyd, I recommend buying all of their albums rather than a hits compilation (I know I say this I lot, but I can't stress it enough!) This album may take a little longer to grow on you than, say, Dark Side Of The Moon, but eventually you'll grow to love it. Once again, this is highly recommended to all Pink Floyd fans.
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5.0 out of 5 stars an artist's vision, April 21 2004
By 
booboo bear (Winnipeg, Manitoba Canada) - See all my reviews
This review is from: The Piper at the Gates of Dawn (Audio CD)
Without question my favorite albums are those done by artists whose sole intent is to create a reflection of what they feel and believe at that particular time. The titles that really stand the test are those which can still convey an artist's vision vividly and artistically decades (or more) later.
The world, both socially and politically, was a very different place in the late sixties whether kids were still buying Monkees albums or just turning on to Hendrix. Generally most people's mindset was much more naive than today and there was a place for experimental music that came from the artist rather than his marketing analyst or demographics sales coordinator. Music of that sort, no matter what the genre, is genuine and usually somewhat insightful even if it isn't particularly entertaining, which this album is.
No... it doesn't sound like DSOTM or The Wall but that isn't surprising. I mean really, who would expect the Beatles first album to sound like Abbey Road? If Lennon, McCartney and the lads put out SGT PEPPERS in 1963 they'd probably have been shunned and locked up as dangerous lunatics. Artists, just like real people, grow and evolve... then they die. But the art lives on and I'm really glad Syd Barrett and the boys put this gem together because it captures what the musical underground was really about back then BETTER than any other album I've listened to.
If everything you hear has to sound like variations of the same album you should be sure to pick up every live/studio/bootleg/allstar knockoff and tribute to The Wall that there is. But if you're actually interested in where all this came from (and not so jaded that every flavor has to taste the same) then treat yourself to a real gem and pick up PATGOD.
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