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4.5 out of 5 stars
In Rock: Anniversary Edition
Format: Audio CDChange
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Showing 1-10 of 20 reviews(4 star)show all reviews
on June 17, 2004
I first came to this record when I was in the 7th grade seeking out early heavy metal bands to brag about rather than the ole Guns N Roses and Metallica shtick that everyone was into around 1990 or so. I originally planned to buy "Machine Head" but found the song titles on this one much more interesting and "heavy." I got in home and put it on and was knocked off my feet! The opening blast of "Speed King" completely floored me and I was dragged through the whole record by the throat without mercy! On the cassette version, side one closed with "Into the Fire" and side twos line up was "Flight of the Rat," "Living Wreck," and closed with "Hard Lovin Man." I still think that track line up worked better. Yes it's true that "Fireball," their 1971 follow up was better paced and had a bit more variety but if you want STRAIGHT FOR THE JUGULAR...this ones it! I recently repurchased it on CD after quite a few years without it and fell in love with it all over again! WHY CLASSIC ROCK RADIO DOSEN'T PLAY "FLIGHT OF THE RAT" IS BEYOND ME!!! The song is practically punk rock and makes you want to start slamming! Well, I do know why....because it was not a "hit single" or a "single" at all. Someone just needs to be informed about it! It's an awesome track! Needless to say, this album surpassed Zeppelin and Sabbath for me back then and it might just do the same for you! Check it out!
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on May 28, 2004
'In Rock' has always been one of my favourite albums from the 70's golden era of rock & roll. 'Child In Time' blew my mind the first time I heard it. It's here in all it's glory as well as all the other tracks on this expanded edition. Some albums retain their magic through the years while others flame out in a hurry. 'In Rock' retains that magic these many years later. Although it does sound dated(both performance-wise and sonically)it is a classic in the DP catalog. The booklet is very informative but lacks lyrics which is strange for a special edition. Sound quality is best catagorized as 'raw', even the booklet explains this in detail(needles pinned to the red)so if you are expecting a 1000 veils lifted remaster, you'll be disappointed. Missing is the high end which is sad since a lot of detail is in that 16k region. Compared to the Warner Bros. version, this version is better but not that much better. It still sounds distorted and grungy which was probably the point to begin with. Master tapes were used but I would have liked to have heard a remixed version, re-eq'd of course. Still, it's worth having since it will be the definite edition for now. The bonus tracks are interesting but hardly essential. Picture disc. 20 tracks/78.29.
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on March 19, 2004
Deep Purple In Rock (1970.) Deep Purple's fourth album, and the first to feature new lead vocalist Ian Gillan.
Not long after Deep Purple released their third studio album, which was self-titled, vocalist Rod Evans was out of the band (a few years later he would form a new band called Captain Beyond.) The band needed a replacement for Evans, so they got Ian Gillan, who would ultimately go on to become known as the band's finest lead vocalist. The first single he released with the band, Black Night, proved beautifully that he had what it would take to be a member of one of rock and roll's many rising young bands. And in 1970 the band recorded its first full-length album with Mr. Gillan at the helm - the appropriately-titled Deep Purple In Rock. Read on for my review.
The album is kicked off by one of the band's biggest hits, Speed King. In my opinion this song is SEVERELY overrated, but it's still pretty good, although I'm not too fond of the band stealing lyrics from various oldies. Oh well. The album's second track, Bloodsucker, is a classic metal-style rocker, reminiscent of some of the band's later work with vocalist David Coverdale. Blackmore's guitar playing here is priceless. The third track on the album is Child In Time, a ten-minute epic that has gone on to become a fan favorite. The variety of stylings used in this tune is its greatest strength. One of the songs on the album that tends to get the most praise is a little tune called Flight Of The Rat. I'm not exactly sure what's up with that title, but the song kicks. Although this IS Deep Purple, this sounds more like a classic punk rock song! And the band's take on these stylings is nothing short of excellent. Combine the guitar mastery of Ritchie Blackmore with an excellent backing keyboard track, and the results never fail. This is the finest song on the album, and I'm sure many other fans agree. Into The Fire is NOT the same song Dokken would record a decade and a half later, but it's still an excellent composition. This is classic seventies hard rock as it was meant to be heard. You can't NOT love this song! Number six, Living Wreck, takes the sound the band used with previous vocalist Rod Evans, and updates it with Gillan's vocals. The album is closed out with Hard Lovin' Man. This is excellent, fast-paced classic hard rock/heavy metal. Once again, Blackmore's guitars have been paired with a backing keyboard track. Blackmore even shells out a killer solo in the latter half of the song. All in all, Deep Purple In Rock isn't quite a perfect album, but it's still a classic hard rock masterpiece.
A number of different versions of this album have been released over the years. The most common version available is the American Warner Bros. reissue, which is the original version of the album as it appeared in America, with the EDITED version of Speed King. Recently overseas, an anniversary edition was released, which restores Speed King to its natural length and adds a whole extra disc of bonus tracks, but this version is WAY more expensive than its American counterpart. No matter what version of the album you buy, Deep Purple In Rock is excellent.
What more is there to say? If you're a fan of classic hard rock/heavy metal, Deep Purple In Rock is an album that MUST be added to your collection. Sure, it lacks the expertise of, say, Fireball or Machine Head, but it serves as a premonition to the band's future successes. Once again, this is highly recommended!
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on February 27, 2004
Deep Purple In Rock (1970.) Deep Purple's fourth album, and the first to feature new lead vocalist Ian Gillan.
Not long after Deep Purple released their third studio album, which was self-titled, vocalist Rod Evans was out of the band (a few years later he would form a new band called Captain Beyond.) The band needed a replacement for Evans, so they got Ian Gillan, who would ultimately go on to become known as the band's finest lead vocalist. The first single he released with the band, Black Night, proved beautifully that he had what it would take to be a member of one of rock and roll's many rising young bands. And in 1970 the band recorded its first full-length album with Mr. Gillan at the helm - the appropriately-titled Deep Purple In Rock. Read on for my review.
The album is kicked off by one of the band's biggest hits, Speed King. In my opinion this song is SEVERELY overrated, but it's still pretty good, although I'm not too fond of the band stealing lyrics from various oldies. Oh well. The album's second track, Bloodsucker, is a classic metal-style rocker, reminiscent of some of the band's later work with vocalist David Coverdale. Blackmore's guitar playing here is priceless. The third track on the album is Child In Time, a ten-minute epic that has gone on to become a fan favorite. The variety of stylings used in this tune is its greatest strength. One of the songs on the album that tends to get the most praise is a little tune called Flight Of The Rat. I'm not exactly sure what's up with that title, but the song kicks. Although this IS Deep Purple, this sounds more like a classic punk rock song! And the band's take on these stylings is nothing short of excellent. Combine the guitar mastery of Ritchie Blackmore with an excellent backing keyboard track, and the results never fail. This is the finest song on the album, and I'm sure many other fans agree. Into The Fire is NOT the same song Dokken would record a decade and a half later, but it's still an excellent composition. This is classic seventies hard rock as it was meant to be heard. You can't NOT love this song! Number six, Living Wreck, takes the sound the band used with previous vocalist Rod Evans, and updates it with Gillan's vocals. The album is closed out with Hard Lovin' Man. This is excellent, fast-paced classic hard rock/heavy metal. Once again, Blackmore's guitars have been paired with a backing keyboard track. Blackmore even shells out a killer solo in the latter half of the song. All in all, Deep Purple In Rock isn't quite a perfect album, but it's still a classic hard rock masterpiece.
A number of different versions of this album have been released over the years. The most common version available is the American Warner Bros. reissue, which is the original version of the album as it appeared in America, with the EDITED version of Speed King. Recently overseas, an anniversary edition was released, which restores Speed King to its natural length and adds a whole extra disc of bonus tracks, but this version is WAY more expensive than its American counterpart. No matter what version of the album you buy, Deep Purple In Rock is excellent.
What more is there to say? If you're a fan of classic hard rock/heavy metal, Deep Purple In Rock is an album that MUST be added to your collection. Sure, it lacks the expertise of, say, Fireball or Machine Head, but it serves as a premonition to the band's future successes. Once again, this is highly recommended!
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on January 15, 2004
Deep Purple In Rock is a timeless and classic hard rock album, its essential to any hard rock collection, well any rock collection in general! In Rock is hard, spaced, and greatly put together, it is a very concistant rock album!
Much like Led Zeppelin and Black Sabbath (the other big hard rock giants of the day) Deep Purple was on top of their game. Richie Blackmore is one of the best guitar players to ever pick up the instrument! the rest of the band are all very good at what they do weather it be Ian Gillans amazing vocal range, Jon Lords brilliant keyboards, Roger Glovers rumbling bass, or Ian Paice over the top drumming this band was at the top of their game when the recorded In Rock.
All The songs are classic, where as there isnt a whole bunch of songs its ok because the 7 songs that are here all are amazing. 'Speed King' is a great hard rocker. 'Child In Time' is one of Deep Purples best songs and the solo is the single greateest guitar solo ever played! just listen for yourself and you'll know what I mean. 'The Flight Of The Rat' is such and awsome song with a killer riff by Backmore.
Deep Purple In Rock is one of the best albums ever made, its just falls short of Machine Head because it doesnt have as many songs.
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on April 19, 2003
I already wrote a review for the standard cd version, but since it doesn't appear on my reviews list, this intenionally different one will. This is the version of this hard rock classic to own. Awesome, Spinal Tap-like volume in the red, remastered sound. The extras are nice, particularly the smokin' Black Night single on which Blackmore punishes the tremolo bar, and an interesting alternate version of Speed King. I now know of 3 official alternate versions, the other two on the must own 'Listen Learn Read On' box set. This was the first hard rock album that featured two lead soloists(both virtuosos), and there's only one guitarist for a change. How many rock bands have a keyboardist who, like the guitarist, is just as strong technically and volume-wise? Very few indeed, and remember, Purple's playing only got better from here, and was actually already better live. Perhaps Led Zeppelin were at home in the studio more often since they actually got along, but Purple Mk II did manage some incredible studio performances(and they were always better live, the best hard rockers out there)before singer Gillan had enough of Blackmore and made like a speed king out of there. Definitely lamentable considering Gillan's phenomenal vocal range("Child In Time" on here says it all)pitted against Blackmore's in-your-face guitar heroics. Of course live, with Lord's classical and jazz leanings as well, this old album had simply more to offer all around than the competion(the closest thing in '70 was Zeppelin, but they were hard-blues rock). Anyway, this is early, raw Mk II trying on their first studio offering for size. That's the charm here, hearing hard rock's finest ever live band using volume and technical agression as a weapon, before more polished later studio albums. Machine Head is Mk II Purple's best(not counting live)I think, but this is where it all began, baby. To paraphrase a tune here, "Heeeaaarrr them flyyyy"!
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on March 11, 2003
This is the album where Purple decided to step up to Zeppelin and crank their amps to 11, no make that 12, in the faces of all their supposedly "heavy" competition. Forget about subtlety, Purple bashes away all those bands like Sabbath and Zeppelin not only with sheer volume, but with unmatched virtuosity. Yeah, progressive rock bands like Yes, ELP, and King Crimson could go up against Purple from a virtuosic standpoint, but no guitar band could equal them for the raw gusto they displayed at their best. And you'll definitely find Purple at their best on this classic. Its a funny thing when people say Zeppelin II is as unsubtle as the hammer of the gods, because In Rock is certainly less so. So then, what is more unsubtle than unsubtle? Blackmore and Lord's blast furnace lines, their guitar and organ lines are so heavy yet light on their feet, Gillian expressing so much emotion, from subtle(yes subtle), nuanced phrasing to deafening, in-key screams that NO ONE has matched because Gillian has a throaty roar that never thins out. Oh, yeah going back to Blackmore and Lord for a moment, who else were as exacting in their discipline(such as sounding cleanly dirty)in hard rock in those days? And as far as inventiveness goes, it seems damn-near all the rock players from one generation into the future on up either sound ridiculously amateurish or play very precise but without the depth of feel and/or ideas that Blackmore(guitar) and Lord(of the keys) had, and probably still do. As for Glover(bass) and Paice(drums), the best way to put it is, Beware: viscious rhythm section ahead! If you're not ready to rumble, then do stay clear because Glover's a fast Chinese water torcher(spelling intentional)with his incessant pick attack who means business and Paice will brutally pound your a$$ to puddy. Its senseless to go into the songs. I mean, Speed King, Bloodsucker, Child In Time, Flight Of The Rat, Into the Fire are exhillerating! I recommend buying the anniversary version of this cd because it includes the killer Black Night(listen to that Blackmore whammy, just listen)plus rimixes, bonus tracks, and is REMASTERED. So, jump "into the fire" with this album if you haven't already. You won't get burned. Perhaps singed...
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on December 5, 2001
First of all, I think that the cover of this album is pretty cool. But the musical quality is even cooler. While Purple might not have the entire Machine Head sound mapped out yet, they still play with raw, reckless, and amped-up aggression. The addition of Ian Gillian on vocals for their previous album gave this band the much needed push into hard-hitting territory, which is exactly what this album is all about. Blackmore's playing hasn't quite achieved Rainbow status yet, but it is almost unnoticeable among Jon Lord's speeding organ, Roger Glover's heavy bass, and Ian Paice's wild drumming. Don't expect any Lepplin-esque style or grace here; expect blugeoning hard rock. From the raging opener "Speed King" to the tortured "Child in Time" to "Bloodsucker", the entire album consists purely of burgeoning metallic fury. Upon repeated listens, it is easy to see why this band was so influential in the hard rock and heavy metal genres of music. Highly Recommended.
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on November 21, 1999
Deep Purple, being a band who has always had their finger on the popular pulse, sensed in 1970 that psychadellia was out and heavy metal was in and adjusted their sound accordingly. This transition was accomplished so succesfully that this first album of the hard-rock Purple sounds little like the bands first three art-rock albums full of classical fusion and re-arranged Beatles covers. In Rock, while the material is not quite as strong overall as later Purple albums of the seventies would be, nonetheless contains two of the greatest songs the band ever did: the opener "Speed King" which, living up to its title, threatens to snap your neck every time you listen to it - this early example of speed metal deserves all the accolades that the comparitively plodding "Highway Star" of more renown fame from Machine Head gets. And "Child in Time", what more can be said about that? One of the most mind-blowing songs ever written simply to listen to it exhausts both body and soul. Those two magnificent songs alone are enough to forget the negligable filler on this record. An instant classic.
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on November 15, 1999
If you're a Purple fan, you can't avoid this record, which really shows a band finding its unique voice & sound. All other albums that follow are really based on the foundations of this record. Nevertheless, it doesn't contain classic material only - side two, starting with "Flight of the Rat" is most definitely the weaker side of the album - in fact, I tend to skip it altogether ! But side 1 is a killer side with Speed King, Bloodsucker and Child in Time perfectly aligned - besides, I've never heard such a beautiful collection of wild sounds that starts the record - and then Jon Lord's organ sets in - just marvellous ! That in itself makes this album a classic ! Was "Child in Time"'s riff really based on It's A Beautiful Day's "Bombay Calling"? Don't know, and don't care - it doesn't take the shine off one of the defining records in hard rock history.
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