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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Back to heavy rock!
After the thin sounding Burn and Stormbringer Purple return with a great sounding rock album full of energy and power. Too bad Bolin was a doomed junkie as the live shows from this tour sound horrible. Too much cocaine, heroin and screaming. The album however is a different story. It's impossible to get in stores so order it here while you can. This album ranks up there...
Published on Sept. 15 2010 by J. Doran

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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars ritchie is king
yeah yeah tommy is good on this album but you are comparing BOLIN THE SERF OR SQUIRE TO BLACKMORE THE KING. sorry to contradict an earlier reveiwer but listen for yourself on this one then listen to a blackmore one. bolin is a pale comparison to the brilliance of blackmore. colwyn
Published on June 21 2008 by Robert P. Hainsworth


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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Back to heavy rock!, Sept. 15 2010
By 
J. Doran "Beejayca" (Canada) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Come Taste The Band (Audio CD)
After the thin sounding Burn and Stormbringer Purple return with a great sounding rock album full of energy and power. Too bad Bolin was a doomed junkie as the live shows from this tour sound horrible. Too much cocaine, heroin and screaming. The album however is a different story. It's impossible to get in stores so order it here while you can. This album ranks up there with the Gillan stuff. A lot more funkier and jazzier than previous efforts it still rocks like it's on fire. Great stuff from the purps but never repeated. Too bad.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars ritchie is king, June 21 2008
By 
Robert P. Hainsworth "colwyn" (LONDON ONTARIO CANADA) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Come Taste the Band (Audio CD)
yeah yeah tommy is good on this album but you are comparing BOLIN THE SERF OR SQUIRE TO BLACKMORE THE KING. sorry to contradict an earlier reveiwer but listen for yourself on this one then listen to a blackmore one. bolin is a pale comparison to the brilliance of blackmore. colwyn
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4.0 out of 5 stars Original recording, Jan. 10 2014
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: Come Taste The Band (Audio CD)
Purchased as Christmas gift. Arrived prior to my expectation and in time for Christmas.
Quality recording. Original band members. Would recommend supplier.
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The BEST Deep Purple Album!!!!! Have YOU Heard It???, May 6 2004
By 
T. Kasuboski (Winneconne, Wisconsin United States) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Come Taste the Band (Audio CD)
Here is why "Come Taste The Band" is the BEST Purple album.
1. Tommy Bolin was a better guitarist and song writer than Ritchie Blackmore.
2. The album works as a WHOLE, and builds into a finale rivaled only by(in a VERY different way) 'Hard Lovin' Man' from "In Rock".
3. Coverdale, for ONE album ("Come Taste The Band") sounds BETTER than Ian Gillan.
4. Glenn Hughes and Tommy Bolin were the greatest duo to ever grace a Purple album(JUST LISTEN TO 'Gettin' Tighter'!!!)
5. The album recieved virtually NO airplay, but after about 2 listens you can hum every damn song....
6. "Come Taste The Band" acts as a showcase for each members(Coverdale, Bolin, Hughes, Lord, Paice) unique talents, and offers a BALANCE often lacking in the Blackmore controlled albums.
7. The story behind the album is by far the most interesting of any Purple album. This line-up and album SHOULD have sucked!!! But instead, with the help(?) of massive amounts of cocaine, Bolin's inovations, a lack of Blackmore's ego and control, and a frighteningly brilliant BOND between ALL the players on this particular album, "Come Taste The Band" stands out as a perfect product. It almost makes you cry at the fact that this Purple line-up only released ONE album. It DOES make you cry that Tommy Bolin(possibly the greatest guitar prodigy of the 70's) died of an overdose a year later.
8. In memory of Bolin, this album stands as a memorial to his ability to work with ANY band. Even one as ego-filled as Deep Purple. Come Taste This Album. DO NOT DISMISS IT LIKE SO MANY OTHER PURPLE FAN FOOLS!!!! The album is a 10 outta 10, just like everything else Tommy Bolin was associated with.
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5.0 out of 5 stars raunchy, but romantic......., Dec 8 2005
By A Customer
This review is from: Come Taste the Band (Audio CD)
this & "stormbringer" are my only 2 deep purple albums.
this has most of my fave tracks.
okay, some of is a little raunchy, but also some of it is brilliant.
"gettin' tighter" has a brilliant funky '70s beat to it, & the vocals are excellent.
also, "this time around" is a timeless anthem, with soulful vocals.
& "you keep on movin'" is a beautiful song, a typical dave coverdale love song.
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3.0 out of 5 stars Can one replace the irreplaceable?, June 17 2004
By 
Robin C. Smith (Westchester County, NY, United States) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Come Taste the Band (Audio CD)
Come Taste the Band was disappointing to many Purple fans because it lacks one of the driving forces of the band, and indeed its most visual and spectacular player - Richie Blackmore. Without him many wondered really whether this could really be DP at all. As a result, this album is shunned by most fans. Personally, as someone who loves Blackmore, they are both right and wrong. Tommy Bolin is a completely different sounding player to Blackmore - gone are the slick, perfectly played, bluesy, and sustained melodic and blisteringly fast lines of Blackmore, in with plenty of overdriven slide guitar and jamming over the top of the still formidable Purple rhythm section. Lots of overdubs as opposed to the Blackmore clarity of purpose. The album in many ways lacks the killer riffs that Blackmore could, and can, conjure up in his sleep. But I still like this album. Although it sounds very different, the material is still pretty good, and Bolin makes the material his own. Coverdale is just superb (as he really was in the 70s) and Bolin is much more at home with Glenn Hughes' love of funk - harkening back to his days with Billy Cobham. Is this a great album? No, but it is certainly a fair-to-good heavy rock album that has its moments.
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5.0 out of 5 stars 24K Purple, March 17 2004
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This review is from: Come Taste the Band (Audio CD)
Without a doubt, the most incredible album ever made. Listening to this album was not only enjoyable but made me realize the talent that was behind the genious of Tommy Bolin. Deep Purple was hurting when guitar guru Richie Blackmore abandon ship in 1975, and with the rest of the band picking up the pieces and soldiering forth, they picked the one and only Tommy Bolin to do what has hailed as impossible, replace Richie Blackmore. A task most guitar players feared due to being critized in comparison, Bolin wasn't all to familiar with the band's music in the first place, and also it gave him the opportunity to use the band to help launch his solo career. With that all said, Tommy Bolin and Deep Purple together made the most unusual sounding Deep Purple album of the band's entire career. Never before has a Deep Purple album contained rock, funk, jazz, fusion, and soul all in one, and it never has happened since this album either. This album has rock such as Comin' Home, Love Child, Lady Luck and Dealer all of which go right up there with any of Blackmore's stuff. This album also has funk with Gettin' Tighter, courtesy of bassist/vocalist Glenn Hughes and Tommy Bolin. The song This Time Around/Owed To "G", is a double tribute to Stevie Wonder(This Time Around) and to Gershiwn(Owed To "G"), filled with soul, jazz, rock, and fusion all in one. There are many other great songs on here, but listening to this album makes you realize the band wasn't afraid to take chances. This album broke all the Purple rules and traditions, letting Glenn Hughes sing lead twice, Tommy Bolin sing lead on a verse on the song Dealer, David Coverdale and Glenn Hughes singing together on You Keep on Moving, and Jon Lord letting Bolin just taking over the music and soloing all over the album. A true masterpiece this album is, and it's sad to believe they made only one album together. Actually, if you think about it, Come Taste The Band could pass as Whitesnake's first album because it's music is such a departure from the band's already signature sound that it doesn't even sound like Deep Purple, since 3 out of 5 members went onto Whitesnake. But thats not to say it doesn't sound beautiful, because this is a beautiful album. Enjoy.
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4.0 out of 5 stars One of My All-time favorites - simply awesome, March 14 2004
By 
C. Willms (Saint Paul, MN United States) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Come Taste the Band (Audio CD)
Being old enough to remember when this album came out dates me to the 70's, but just as I like think I get better with age I surely know "Come Taste the Band" does. As much as I loved the original cast of Deep Purple this one-time line up achieves great things! The guitar work of Tommy Bolin is nothing short of spectacular. Coverdale's vocals also sparkle. Perhaps the best song is an anthem garage bands can relate to called "Getting Tighter". "Drifter" and the ballad called "This Time Around" also shine. While this record never got the air play it richly deserved Deep Purple fans and Tommy Bolin fans should add this unique offering to their collection...
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4.0 out of 5 stars 4.5 stars - Come taste this album, March 2 2004
This review is from: Come Taste the Band (Audio CD)
Come Taste The Band (1975.) Deep Purple's tenth album, and the only one to feature guitarist Tommy Bolin. Also the last album to feature David Coverdale and Glenn Hughes.
In 1975, Deep Purple guitarist Ritchie Blackmore was no longer impressed with the way the band was being run. In a twist of fate that must have shocked everyone, Blackmore, who had been in the band since their earliest days, left the band. His replacement was Tommy Bolin, formerly of classic rock legends the James Gang. This would be the band's final studio album, that is, until the 1984 Mark Two reunion. How does this, the last album to feature David Coverdale and Glenn Hughes, measure up? Read on and find out.
This is probably Deep Purple's most bluesy-sounding album. But it's no less heavy than the others. Sadly though, this album never achieved the popularity of some of the band's better-known work. That's a shame, because it's just as good. Comin' Home, one of the band's most memorable rockers, kicks off this album. It's an excellent track that will grab your attention and hold into it. The second track, Lady Luck, is also excellent. And then we have the classic seventies-based rock stylings of Gettin' Tighter. Once again, the band serves up a winner. Dealer is a track that sounds strikingly similar to Paul Di'Anno-era Iron Maiden - something that goes to show you just how influential this band was. All in all, there isn't a single weak track on this album. It's not quite up to the quality of, say, Fireball, Machine Head, or Burn, but it's still a VERY strong album. Why are Deep Purple's days with David Coverdale so underrated? This guy knew how to sing! Also, Tommy Bolin deserves some major credit. It's not easy to fill the shoes of a guitar mastermind like Ritchie Blackmore, but here Bolin does it like it's nothing at all! It's one hell of an album.
It's a shame this would be Deep Purple's last studio album for nine years, up until the Mark Two reunion in 1984. Following the release of this album, David Coverdale would go on to become a fairly popular solo artist, and would eventually become the lead vocalist for classic eighties power rockers Whitesnake. Likewise, Glenn Hughes would go on to sing on one of Black Sabbath's albums, just like earlier Deep Purple member Ian Gillan. Why he ditched the bass for lead vocals is beyond me! This and the Coverdale-era album before it, Stormbringer, are out of print and very difficult to come by, but if you manage to find them and you're a fan of the band, don't hesitate to purchase them. The Coverdale era is Deep Purple's most unappreciated - but it's also some of their finest material.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Like Wine, This Album Has Aged Perfectly, Dec 30 2003
This review is from: Come Taste the Band (Audio CD)
Whichever line-up you prefer, it has to be said that Deep Purple remained a tight and powerful unit even after the classic Blackmore-Gillan-Glover-Lord-Paice version had fractured. 1973-75 were uneasy years for the group, and "Come Taste the Band" is the best album from this shaky put productive era. Guitarist Ritchie Blackmore had gone by this time, preceeded in 1973 by bassist Roger Glover and lead screamer Ian Gillan. Their respective replacements were the late Tommy Bolin, Glenn Hughes, and David Coverdale, steered by faithful members Jon Lord and Ian Paice, to make this solid and charged effort.
"Come Taste the Band" is often tight and limited in its structures, which actually helps the songs achieve their heights. It rocks ('Dealer'), it rolls ('You Keep On Moving,' 'Comin' Home'), it swoons (Bolin's interesting 'Owed To 'G,' a section of the track 'This Time Around'). The production is very meticulous and as a result, is very fitting to DP's brand of hard rock. In addition, much of the material translated very well onto the live stage, as many of the songs would become thrilling pieces of Deep Purple concerts throughout the brief remainder of their 70s career (see "This Time Around: Live in Tokyo '75").
Its predecessors, "Burn" and "Stormbringer," were fine efforts, but neither have aged as well as "Come Taste the Band." Upon first listen, without knowing the history, this album hardly sounds as if it were recorded by a band that was ready to buckle under professional and personal pressures. Rather, it sounds like a band just getting started, mainly because it's not as complex as earlier efforts. Unfortunately, that wasn't the case, and "Come Taste the Band" would be Deep Purple's last album for nearly a decade.
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