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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Golden Nuggets
Nuggets was originally released in 1972 as a double album. It celebrated the garage rock music of the mid 60's with future Patti Smith guitarist Lenny Kaye providing dead-on liner notes. The band's featured on the album laid the blueprint for such bands as The New York Dolls, The Stooges and Patti Smith as well as the punk movement. The songs are no nonsense, crazed...
Published on Nov. 1 2001 by P Magnum

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3.0 out of 5 stars Nuggets: The Hitz!
It seems that when Rhino Records embarked on breaking down its very cool Nuggets box set into one affordable CD, they took the simple route of just including the biggest chart hits, leaving much of the more obscure stuff (Shadows of Knight, Sonics, Barry & the Remains, etc.) off this set. The 13th Floor Elevators *are* included, so it's not like Rhino was ignoring...
Published on Dec 30 2000 by Ben McClellan


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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Golden Nuggets, Nov. 1 2001
This review is from: Nuggets Psychedelic Era 65-68 (Audio CD)
Nuggets was originally released in 1972 as a double album. It celebrated the garage rock music of the mid 60's with future Patti Smith guitarist Lenny Kaye providing dead-on liner notes. The band's featured on the album laid the blueprint for such bands as The New York Dolls, The Stooges and Patti Smith as well as the punk movement. The songs are no nonsense, crazed out rockers with some psychedelia and dance tracks thrown in. Rhino Records has done an amazing job expanding the original double album into a four cd set. Some of the songs like The Kingsmen "Louie, Louie", Sam The Sham & Pharaoh's "Wooly Bully", The Outsiders' "Time Wont Let Me", The Human Beinz propulsive "Nobody But Me", The Musical Explosion's "Little Bit O' Soul", The Count Five's "Psychotic Reaction", The Castaways' "Liar, Liar" were all top ten hits with The Strawberry Alarm Clock's "Incense & Peppermint" going all the way to number one. For the most part, the collection is made up of obscure songs that were minor national hits and regional hits around the country. Songs like The Cryan Shames' searing "Sugar & Spice", The Barbarians' earnest "Moulty", The Lollipop Shoppe's pulsating "You Must Be A Witch", The Sonics' "Strychnine", Kim Fowley's spooky "The Trip", Rare Breed's (who became American Breed and scored a top ten hit with Bend Me, Shape Me) r&b flavored "Beg, Borrow & Steal", Richard & The Young Lions' stellar "Open Up Your Door", The Bees' buzzing "Voices Green & Purple" and The Palace Guards' bubble gummy "Falling Sugar" are all basically unknowns. But they all show an immense amount of heart and soul and the classic three chords and a dream philosophy of most bands out there. Some well known bands show up with some lesser known hits like The Turtles, Captain Beefheart and Paul Revere & The Raiders whose "Just Like Me" is an absolute rave-up. Some famous artists appear in their first or lesser known groups like Todd Rundgren with The Nazz on "Open Our Eyes, Ted Nugent on two songs from The Amboy Dukes, ZZ Top's Billy Gibbons with The 13th Floor Elevators and Creedence Clearwater Revival shows up under their original moniker, The Golliwogs, with the chooglin "Fight Fire". Other great songs include some semi-famous tracks like the frat rock classics "Double Shot (Of My Baby's Love" by The Swinging Medallions and The Premiers "Farmer John", The Standells' "Dirty Water", The Strangeloves "I Want Candy" which Bow Wow Wow would turn into a new wave staple, Love's influential "7 And 7 Is" and the Tex-ex stylings of The Hombres' "Let It Out (Let It All Hang Out)". Nuggets is an essential collection for any fan of rock to have in their collection.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Trippy noise from the garage, Aug. 17 2003
By 
chris meesey Food Czar (The Colony, TX United States) - See all my reviews
A lot of you twenty-and thirty somethings out there probably think that psychedelic music was all swirling colors, flashing strobe lights, and intergalactic journeys of the mind. You would be wrong of course; all those sounds came later (mostly in the early seventies). Nope, early psychedelia was made with fuzzed-out guitars, Farfisa (or Vox) organ solos, and amps that were very small. In short, garage band music with a mindbending twist. (Think Very early Pink Floyd, such as "See Emily Play," rather than Dark Side of the Moon.) In his liner notes to the set, Greg Shaw does an outstanding job of linking these three-minute wonders to the punk and new wave movements of a decade later. Both proto-punk ("Dirty Water," "Pushin' Too Hard," and the Music Machine's wonderful "Talk, Talk"), and pre-new wave ("I Want Candy" and "The Shape of Things to Come") are well represented here. Also present are several selections from one-hit wonder soundalike bands, such as the Beatlesque Knickerbockers ("Lies"), the Byrd-like Leaves ("Hey, Joe", which was actually covered better by other artists), and, best of all, the Count Five, whose Yardbirds clone, "Psychotic Reaction" (complete with mini rave-up instrumental break) is not to be missed. One problem: Rhino Records have set the bar so high with this compilation, it's easy to start nitpicking. For instance, Love would be better represented with "My Little Red Book" than by the track offered here. And where are those all-time garage classics "Wild Thing," by the Troggs, and "Gloria" by Shadows of Knight (or by the Van-Morrison-led group Them)? These, however, are minor quibbles. Overall, Nuggets from Nuggets is good enough to make you want to race to your garage (or living room), clear out a space in the middle, and Start Dancing!!!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A lot of stuff., June 7 2002
By 
Bruce P. Barten (Saint Paul, MN United States) - See all my reviews
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I was recently playing this album, which I ordered when I was trying to find some version of a familiar song that I still have not heard, for the benefit of someone who thought that "Lies" by the Knickerbockers sounded like it was by the famous Beatles. About all I could tell about "Lies" from skimming through the CD liner notes of "Nuggets from Nuggets" was that it was a number 20 pop hit released in November, 1965. Having a group that sounded like the Beatles was not a disadvantage that year, but it isn't automatically a sign of greatness. I could have said, "Yeah, but The Knickerbockers were good," or "The Beatles weren't much better." Is that offensive to people who never heard of them? The attempt by Rhino Entertainment Company in 2000 to explain in 24 CD-size pages (a picture of The Knickerbockers is on page 4) the psychedelic era of the 1960s as it relates to a collection of songs, praised for being part of a do-it-yourself approach to music ("The corporate record labels have always opposed this.") hardly encompasses such gems as "Liar, Liar" by The Castaways, released in May, 1965 and number 12 on the pop chart. Anyone who reads the list of songs on this album looking for great hits they've always wanted might be surprised at how few of the titles ring a bell. The Electric Prunes and Strawberry Alarm Clock sound like group names from the psychedelic era, but "Louie Louie" by The Kingsmen was so mainstream that it was a number 2 pop hit in 1963, long before a lot of rock 'n' roll ever happened. The real reason for owning this album, in my case, was the original "Hey Joe" by The Leaves, released in April, 1966 and only a number 31 pop hit. Within a few years, I had versions of the song by The Byrds and Jimi Hendrix. A lot of what Jimi Hendrix played on that song had been dropped by the Byrds in their version, and I wanted to know how much music Jimi had learned from the Leaves, and how much of Jimi's version was pure Jimi Hendrix.
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5.0 out of 5 stars The Critics of this Set are Wrong, May 23 2004
By 
Kenneth eggerss (Lincoln, Nebraska United States) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Nuggets Psychedelic Era 65-68 (Audio CD)
The original Nuggets double album is THE most influencial rock album in history.It has been lovingly recreated on the first disc of this set. If anything, the other discs are even stronger.The artwork and historical care that has gone into the info book in this package sets the standard for all who shall follow.If you are a young person who has drifted towards classic rock because of how bad the current scene is, this will demonstrate to you just how correct you are.You will still be listening to this set when you are eighty years old.Knock Knock by the Humane Society and Primitive by the Groupies are almost worth the price by themselves.And let us not forget the Voices Green and Purple.
Some of these were hits. And some of these go to auction when the originals are sold among collectors. It is a nice mix between the two.
As with everything however, this set is not perfect. The info booklet has an incredibly fragile binding and it will come apart on you in short order if you are not aware of it.Rhino should of hard bound it like a owners manual for a car.A small oversight that in no way diminishes that the fact that you MUST own this if you have any interest in Rock's history.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Artyfacts? "OH YEAH!", April 26 2004
By 
Nathan Laney (Northern Cambria, PA USA) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Nuggets Psychedelic Era 65-68 (Audio CD)
I NEVER, EVER in my whole life felt moved to write to a record company thanking them for the time and effort it took to pull a fabulous collection together for our entertainment's sake. But when I purchased my Nuggets box set in 1999, I was compelled to do just that. Five years later, I still can't find the words to adequately sum up my love of this set. I had already been familiar with alot of the songs thanks to Rhino's Nuggets album series of the '80's, and the fact that I'm the 9th of 11 kids. See, back in the mid sixties, I had older brothers and sisters who were buying records and going to dances on Saturday nights. My oldest brother had a set of drums in the Attic where I used to practice "Little Girl" by Syndicate of Sound while the rest of the kids were at school. (I was only 4 at the time) But I knew some of these songs because of the way they used to sell records in the 60's. You could buy a bundle of 10 used (juke boxes) 45's wrapped in cellophane at the local 5 & 10 for a dollar. You could only see the labels of the records on each end which meant that eight of them were pot luck. Since the records were always like new, this is how my older siblings would buy them, and we had TONS of them!
This set reminded me of EXACTLY how it was to buy based on only what you know and take a chance on the rest. And just like then, the investment paid off IN SPADES! This collection defies description. It's fantastic, stupendous, awesome, phenomenal and so much more! I'll NEVER tire of this set! I hope it stays in print forever!
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4.0 out of 5 stars Oh yeah...everything gonna be alright this morning!, Feb. 27 2004
By 
Mark R. Van Wagenen "viagracat" (Elgin, Illinois USA) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Nuggets Psychedelic Era 65-68 (Audio CD)
OK, it helps to have been around in the '60s; that way you have a context to the tunes you get here, and most likely memories attached to at least some of them. Unlike some reviewers who say The Five Americans, Shadows of Knight, Cryan Shames, Swinging Medallions, the Castaways, The Leaves, Standells, etc, etc can't compare to the Beatles; artistically that's obviously true, but if you were a Top 40 music lover from the day, how can you NOT get into at least some of these, well, "nuggets?" You don't hear them all the time on the radio, which is a good thing all by itself, and really, lots of those garage-rock tracks are catchy (and deep down inside, you agree). Disc 4 is weaker than the others (although it does have "Louie Louie", which is NOT a song about getting lucky), the only drawback to this collection. Ignore those who proclaim that lesser-refined bands with less commercial success, like those you find on compilations like this, are not worth the time or money, but like I said, you'll appreciate "Nuggets" more if you were around in the late 1960s. Which, I guess, makes me a geezer. So be it.
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5.0 out of 5 stars If you graduated college in '68 or '69, you'll love it., Dec 26 2003
By 
Benjamin A Peacock (Midlothian, VA United States) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Nuggets Psychedelic Era 65-68 (Audio CD)
For those boomers who were in college in the '60s and partied their way to graduation, you'll recognize many of the tracks from radio play of the day, garage band covers, and fraternity house record players. The great party songs are here.
Who can forget the catchy tunes "Louie, Louie", "Double Shot of My Baby's Love", "Nobody But Me", "Time Won't Let Me", "Talk, Talk", and "Pushin' Too Hard".
If you are looking for the 'Stones, Creedence, Doors, and the other mainstream acts of the day, they are not here. What is here is American rock music from the hard working, one or two hit wonders of the day. The heart and soul of the creative process starting in a garage and making it big for a year or two is what has been captured here.
As others have noted in their reviews, there are about 20-25 must have hits from this collection. While extracting my favorite 22 songs from this collection and buring to a single CD, I discovered the track index is off by one at the start of the second disk. Select the song BEFORE the one you want on disks 2 to 4 and straighten out labels on your copy.
Wonderful.
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4.0 out of 5 stars I'll Tell You Where "96 Tears" Is, June 22 2003
By 
S.J. Dibai (Philadelphia, PA USA) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Nuggets Psychedelic Era 65-68 (Audio CD)
The master to ? & the Mysterians' "96 Tears" was and still is unavailable because its owner, Allen B. Klein, refuses to release it or let anyone use it. So it's not on this box set. Does that detract from the enjoyability of this collection? Absolutely not.
In 1972, future punker Lenny Kaye and Electra Records president Jac Holzman put together a compilation of various mid-to-late '60s American do-it-yourself rock bands and called it NUGGETS. It was an amazing collection, featuring garage, R&B/blues-rock, early punk, psych, pop, and folk-rock. Rhino's 1998 box set features the entire 1972 collection on disc one and then adds three discs that, while less diverse than the original NUGGETS, are of similarly great historical value. The Standells, The Chocolate Watchband, The Sonics, The Shadows of Knight, The Remains, The Seeds--all names to throw around in garage rock, all represented heavily here. A good deal of national hits, lots of regional hits, lots of non-hits. The distinctive sounds of the Midwest, the Pacific Northwest, and Texas are all here for your enjoyment.
The packaging is lavish and highly informative. Of course, the song selection can be quibbled with, but that's always the case with collections like this. The biggest complaints I have are as follows: (1) I know Bill Inglot was trying to be authentic by presenting as much of this stuff as possible in mono, but some of it just sounds better in stereo; (2) since the three additional discs are more garage/punk-oriented than the first, this collection gets somewhat monotonous, hence my mere four-star rating. Still, there is a lot of terrific music here, and there is no better sampler of the kind of music that resulted when American teens and young adults, inspired by The Beatles, The Stones, The Yardbirds, etc., got together and said, "We're gonna make some records, dammit!" Highly recommended.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Kick-... Magnificent, March 25 2003
By A Customer
This review is from: Nuggets Psychedelic Era 65-68 (Audio CD)
This collection is probably the best box set ever compiled and is a must-buy for classic rock fans. Caveat: Those fans of the psychadelic era looking to uncover a lost Sgt. Pepper, Surrealistic Pillow, Pet Sounds, or Forever Changes may want to look elsewhere. If Sgt. Pepper is dinner, then Nuggets is dessert--it is all about fun, and all about the basics: fuzzy, distorted riffs, blues harmonicas, Hammond organs, vocalists who convey raw, assertive emotion, and simple lyrics (in other words, perfection, for my taste). There is a very heavy blues influence here, as well as tracks that mark the infancy, if not the birth, of punk. Fans of the Who, the Stones, and the Animals will probably find Nuggets as exhilarating as I. Call me crazy, but for me, different music is apposite for different seasons. Nuggets is Summer music (Rubber Soul or Desire, by contrast, would be Fall or Winter music). So, if the weather is warm, fill up the tank, roll down the windows, pop in Nuggets and have a blast!
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5.0 out of 5 stars Highly Impressive Garage/Psychedelic Box Set!, Jan. 5 2003
By 
J. E FELL "boogaloojef" (Carterville, Illinois United States) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Nuggets Psychedelic Era 65-68 (Audio CD)
I bought this set because it was on sale for Christmas and I am glad I did. Rhino as usual did an excellent job with this set. The sound is excellent and extensive liner notes and photos are included in the lavish booklet that comes with this 4 cd set. This set which was based on the 1972 set compiled by Lenny Kaye. The first disk includes that entire 1972 set. Kaye's 1972 set helped inspire a whole genre of compilations of obscure garage/psychedelic music. However, this set includes an additional three disks of material not included on the 1972 set. The set also proves to be a great way to pick some excellent singles of some "one hit wonders" of the sixties. Highlights are too many to mention but notable tracks include "Louie Louie" by the Kingsmen, "I Want Candy" and "Night Time" by the Strangeloves, "Wooly Bully" by Sam the Sham and the Pharoahs, "Hey Joe" by the Leaves, "Psychotic Reaction" by the Count Five, "Lies" and "One Track Mind" by the Knickerbockers, "Incense and Peppermints" by Strawberry Alarm Clock and "The Little Black Egg" by the Nightcrawlers. Other favorites include "Let's Talk About Girls" by the Chocolate Watchband, "Dirty Water" by the Standells, "Don't Look Back" and Why Do I Cry" by the Remains. Shadows of Knight, The Amboy Dukes, The Thirteenth Floor Elevators, The Blues Project, The Turtles, Paul Revere & the Raiders, Love, & Captain Beefheart also make appearances. Part of what makes this set great is the discovery of unexpected favorites like "Mr. Pharmacist" by the Other Half, "Mindrocker" by Fenwyck, "Hold Me Now" by the Rumors, "I Ain't No Miracle Worker" by the Brogues, "Live" by the Merry-Go-Round and "So What!" by the Lyrics among others are such unexpected gems. The songs range from the psychedelic of "I Had Too Much To Dream Last Night" by the Electric Prunes to the hard garage sound of "Action Woman" by the Litter, British Invasion influenced R&B like "I Need You" by the Rationals to more pop sounding numbers like "Open My Eyes" by the Nazz. My only criticism is the lack of "Gloria" by the Shadows of Knight and the exclusion of material by bands like Blue Cheer, the Moving Sidewalks and ? and the Mysterians. Don't let these omissions deter you fom this purchase. The set remains in my heavy rotation and is worth every penny for the great sound remastering if nothing else! Fans of sixties garage/pyschedelic music should rejoice with the purchase of this set!
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