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5.0 out of 5 stars A Great Album By An Often Overlooked Sax Player, Aug. 6 2006
By 
Mark Anderson (Victoria, BC, Canada) - See all my reviews
(TOP 50 REVIEWER)    (REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Soul Station (Audio CD)
Some of the other reviewers have written at length about what a

great recording this is. They're right, so I won't spend any time

repeating the same basic points that have already been made.

Bottom line: great album. If you like 1950s/early 1960s jazz, then buy this CD. You won't be disappointed. You might also want

to try Mobley's Workout CD, recorded in 1961.

One previous reviewer mentioned the excellent sound quality on this CD. Good point, so I'll add another comment about it. The album was recorded by Rudy Van Gelder. Anything Van Gelder recorded had excellent sound. Period.

As an anecdote of how good Van Gelder's sound quality is, I was recently in a local specialty audio equipment store and, as I was drooling over some high end audio gear, I got into a conversation about jazz with the owner. He wanted to get some jazz CDs to demo equipment but didn't know much about jazz. I told him about Blue Note Records and mentioned the quality of Rudy Van Gelder's recordings. That picqued his interest and he asked if could bring in a few CDs for him to listen to.

The next day I brought in 2 Van Gelder recordings: Hank Mobley's Soul Station (recorded in 1960) and Charles Earland's "Cookin With The Mighty Burner" (recorded in 1997). Suffice to say that this audiophile equipment store now uses both recordings to demo high end audio equipment.
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5.0 out of 5 stars hank mobley rules, Feb. 25 2004
By 
Pamela C. Panos "pcp23" (Philadelphia, PA United States) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Soul Station (Audio CD)
I love this cd, it has one of my favorite songs on it, this i dig of you. sadly, hank mobley is underrated and overshadowed. buy this now! seriously! buy it! NOW!
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5.0 out of 5 stars Mobley - when he wanted to be - was one of the best, Sept. 7 2003
By 
"douglasnegley" (Pittsburgh, Pa. United States) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Soul Station (Audio CD)
It isn't so much what Hank Mobley says as HOW he says it. One of my favorite sax-men, Mobley has that smoothness like Prez, and the soulful-ness that is unmatched. His "soul" is not necessarily 'lick-oriented', but inside his playing. That is what makes Mobley so emminently enjoyable to listen to - and with this trio of Kelly, Chambers, and Blakey behind him he really gets to stretch out the feeling. This is one of his best -a great session from 1960.
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5.0 out of 5 stars rates A must have, March 5 2003
This review is from: Soul Station (Audio CD)
One of my favorite albums. Hank Mobley was a master sax player and this particular album is 100% solid from start to finish. Listen to the music clips, and if you are pleased, then you will be overjoyed with the remainder of the music. Guaranteed to lift your spirits when you are down.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Great Stuff, Aug. 29 2002
By 
C. Devine (California, USA) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Soul Station (Audio CD)
If you're like me, you've heard Mobley play on many different albums and with many different musicians: "Walkin'" with Miles Friday Night at the Blackhawk, "Doodlin'" with Horace Silver & the Jazz Messengers, Etc. (If you don't have those albums, you best be warming up your credit card!) I'd heard of the Soul Station album previously, but avoided it because I worried it would be too far towards the "soul jazz" movement side of things. Maybe a little too pop oriented like some (not all!) of the soul-jazz albums seemed to be. Because I've never heard any music come from Mobley's horn that wasn't genuine, I bit the bullet and bought this album - I was NOT disappointed. If you haven't bought this album yet, all I can say is "wait no longer" If you liked Mobley on Walkin' and Doodlin', you will flip over this album. His playing is superb, honest, creative, and no BS. Further, listening to Wynton Kelly's solos, as well as his playing behind Hank, are reason enough to buy the album. Throw in Art Blakey and Paul Chambers, and I'm done talking.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Hank's soul food!, Aug. 27 2002
This review is from: Soul Station (Audio CD)
Listening to this warm, rich cd is like enjoying a hot chocolate on a cold winter night, or like watching the sun set over the city. This disc evokes many emotions from me. It literally feels 'warm' to me. Not that this music is sappy or lounge-like. Not at all. This stuff swings. It simmers. It bubbles over. There is an infectious quality to "Remember", "This I Dig of You", and "Dig Dis" especially. "Split Feelin's" really chugs along with enthusiasm and light spirit. The title track is great and "If I Should Lose You" displays a tender quality to Mobley's horn playing that reminds me somewhat of Dexter Gordon in his more introspective moments. This is one of the best hard-bop era recordings. Period. It's not called a classic for no reason...
ESSENTIAL.
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5.0 out of 5 stars relaxed and inspired jazz, Aug. 19 2002
By 
nadav haber (jerusalem Israel) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Soul Station (Audio CD)
This CD received 5 stars from all reviewers - a very rare achievement. The reason this music has not attracted any detractors is that it is unpretensious, swinging, and mellow.
Take for example the third track - "Dig Dis". It is a medium tempo blues played as "straight" as you can get, with the emphasis on sound and swing and not on altered scales, modes or other theoretical devices. It is a blues content with its simplicity. Winton Kelly's opening piano chorus is as good as blues piano gets, and Mobley's theme and solos follow with so much sureness and ease, that infect the listener with the joyous feeling that to me always comes with good blues. Of special interest is Mobley's unaccompanied break that follows the theme. It is two choruses long, and shows Mobley's inventiveness and control to the fullest.
This is not a ground breaking CD, or an experimental attempt at something new. This is music by great musicians who play how they love to play.
I think that a big part of this record's success is the combination of Art Blakey with Winton Kelly and Paul Chambers. These three obviously enjoy playing together, and they create the carpet on which Mobley can lay down his stuff to the maximum.
Kelly's solos on all tracks are wonderful and I believe that a lot of the credit for the music's great mood is due to him.
If I could select a band I would like to go and hear in a jazz club, this band would have been one of my first choices. If I were only that lucky !
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5.0 out of 5 stars An Excellent Album By An Often Overlooked Artist, May 9 2002
By 
Micheal (Victoria, BC, Canada) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Soul Station (Audio CD)
Some of the other reviewers have written at length about what a
great recording this is. They're right, so I won't spend any time
repeating the same basic points that have already been made.
Bottom line: great album. If you like 1950s/early 1960s jazz, then buy this CD. You won't be disappointed. You might also want
to try Mobley's Workout CD, recorded in 1961.
One previous reviewer mentioned the excellent sound quality on this CD. Good point, so I'll add another comment about it. The album was recorded by Rudy Van Gelder. Anything Van Gelder recorded had excellent sound. Period.
As an anecdote of how good Van Gelder's sound quality is, I was recently in a local specialty audio equipment store and, as I was drooling over some high end audio gear, I got into a conversation about jazz with the owner. He wanted to get some jazz CDs to demo equipment but didn't know much about jazz. I told him about Blue Note Records and mentioned the quality of Rudy Van Gelder's recordings. That picqued his interest and he asked if could bring in a few CDs for him to listen to.
The next day I brought in 2 Van Gelder recordings: Hank Mobley's Soul Station (recorded in 1960) and Charles Earland's "Cookin With The Mighty Burner" (recorded in 1997). Suffice to say that this audiophile equipment store now uses both recordings to demo high end audio equipment.
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5.0 out of 5 stars A Masterpiece!!!, March 9 2002
By 
"chibbamaing" (Celbridge, County Kildare Ireland) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Soul Station (Audio CD)
Buy this album. The music works an entire range. From light and airy (swingin') to a more complex brooding style. This is the album that puts Mobley into the upper echelon of jazz musicians. Trust me - buy this album it will not disappoint.
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5.0 out of 5 stars A minor classic, Feb. 21 2002
By 
N. Dorward "obsessive reviewer" (Toronto, ON Canada) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Soul Station (Audio CD)
I got this a few years ago (in an earlier remastering) & it took a while to grow on me. Mobley is one of those players who despite not having an especially large place in the history of the music has earned the affection of a lot of fans of the classic Blue Note sound of the 1960s--his albums are often rabidly sought after by aficionados. Listening to him at first I was immediately struck by his lovely tone, an elegant & loamy sound that comes out of Lester Young but is unmistakably his own. Mobley's lines are not subtle, however: what bothered me the first few times in listening to him was that his solos were largely constructed out of licks assembled in an obvious manner--in a 8-bar sequence of ii7-V7 chords, expect him most of the time to apply the same lick, transposed, to each two-bar section. On the last track, "If I Should Lose You", the second A section predictably enough prompts the "Habanera" from _Carmen_, one of the most hackneyed of bop quotes; next time the A section comes around, he actually plays the intro to Gillespie's "Bebop". You get the idea--it's what jazz musicians call "running changes", & while every jazz musician has to be able to do it, it's not usually considered good form to let it too obviously dictate the shape of solos.
So why 5 stars? Well, this all goes to show that if you transcribe the notes of a solo, you often miss everything that makes it worth listening to. Mobley's sound & relaxed, nuanced sense of time make even an ordinary line into something engaging & satisfying. He is a remarkably songful, tuneful player, which is the flip side of his reliance on comfortable melodic contours: he knows how to inform them with personality & interpretive depth. He also benefits from an excellent rhythm section. Wynton Kelly's piano is characteristically chipper & spry; Paul Chambers is as always unimpeachable; & Art Blakey is an excellent choice, playing much more quietly here than with the Messengers but with no less alertness & appositeness.
Mobley isn't usually thought of as a significant composer (one notable exception is John Zorn, who once recorded a pile of Mobley tunes on _More News for Lulu_). His 4 tunes here aren't on the surface very sophisticated, but they have much of the warmth of his playing. They either use blues structures, or use a favourite two-part structure one often finds in hard-bop compositions of this vintage--a suspended "A" section & a conventionally-moving "B" ("release") section. There are also two readings of standards, both done at a tempo slightly faster than usual: "Remember" & "If I Should Lose You".
All in all, this is a very fine album which exactly captures the virtues of Blue Note's house style in 1960. There were more important albums recorded that year but surely none quite so appealing.
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Soul Station by Hank Mobley (Audio CD - 1999)
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