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11 of 13 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars THE EPIC OF ALL EPICS
Gone With The Wind is one of my favorite films OF ALL TIME. No matter how many times I watch it, I find myself engulfed,overwhelmed,moved to tears, chilled to the bone, and amazed at the pure marvelousness of the entire thing.EVERY FREAKING TIME.
The acting is BRILLIANT from absolutely everyone.That's right, not a single performance is anything less than...
Published on June 13 2004 by adriana

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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars An edition which is a dissapointment of a lifetime!
This edition of the movie is very disappointing to me. I received it as a Christmas present and have I been aware of its poor contents, I would have never wanted it. I have nothing against the movie itself, because it is a classic film which I like very much. My dissatisfaction deals with this edition.
First of all, it shows on the box everything that it contains,...
Published on Jan. 5 2004


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5.0 out of 5 stars Shines..., Feb. 28 2002
By A Customer
This review is from: Gone with the Wind (Full Screen) (DVD)
Dazzling in its eloquency...spans the entire gamut of human emotions while spinning a tale of bygone days...
A must see.
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5.0 out of 5 stars "Gone with the Wind's" racism detracts from its greatness, Feb. 27 2002
This review is from: Gone With the Wind (VHS Tape)
David O. Selznick's 1939 "Gone with the Wind" is a great movie. The production qualities alone far surpass the standards of that long ago era. It was filmed in color, a very expensive and difficult process. The advanced sound quality brought an incomparable realism to the screen. "Gone with the Wind" is admittedly not a meticulous historical study. Martha Mitchell's novel turned to film, though, did highlight the cocky attitude of the agrarian South before it entered into war with the North. There is one early scene that demands our rapt attention. Rhett Butler (Clark Gable) is conversing with some Confederate lads who think that a victory over the hated Yankees will be quick and easy. Not so, says the more realistic Butler. The industrial North is far wealthier and has a larger population of men to send into battle. A fight almost erupts between Rhett Butler and a hotheaded youth who is enraged that he does not also share their reckless confidence. The latter's mind-set clearly dominated the thinking of the South's male leaders who couldn't begin to imagine the horror that imminently lay ahead.
"Gone with the Wind" is built around the self-centered and pampered Scarlett O'Hara. In many ways this aristocratic beauty is a feminist before her time. She is a woman who knows how to deal with the male chauvinists of the business world. She may not have the right to vote, but politicians sit up and take notice of this brash southern belle. Unfortunately, Scarlett's selfishness and mean spirited manipulation of everyone around her is outrageous. Vivien Leigh is superb as a woman deserving of our contempt. She loves Ashley Wilkes (Leslie Howard) but has lost him to another woman. Scarlett goes through a number of wealthy men before marrying Rhett Butler. He adores her, but Scarlett barely gives him the time of day. We view their efforts to conquer adversity and hardship in both the ante and postbellum South. Will they be able to save the Georgian family plantation, Tara? Can they do so and still remain halfway moral and civilized?
The movie's racist overtones cannot be ignored. They are fortunately nowhere as vile as the evil masterpiece "Birth of the Nation." The earlier D.W. Griffith's 1915 production blatantly presented the Ku Klux Klan in a positive light, and portrayed blacks as deceitful and less than fully human. "Gone with the Wind" only indirectly referred to a Klan type group as the savior of the alleged beleaguered white establishment. Hattie McDaniel received an Academy Award for her supporting actresss role as the servant, Mammy. She earned this honor for portraying a black woman who has no real life of her own. Mammy's existential purpose is to give of herself totally to the whims and caprices of her white masters. "Gone with the Wind" deserves a five star rating. Nonetheless, increasingly it is not merely a magnificent work of art---it is also a stark reminder of how far America has progressed in the last sixty three years.
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5.0 out of 5 stars The Greatest Romance Story of All Time, Feb. 8 2002
By 
Amazon Customer (St. Paul, MN United States) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Gone with the Wind (Full Screen) (DVD)
Looking for a movie about the Civil War or Slave Days or even Reconstruction. Then stay away from this movie. You aren't going to see battle scenes or get a history lesson of any sort. This movie isn't about the Civil War. It's a story which just happens to take place during the Civil War. Other than the time period, it has nothing to do with the Civil War.
The story is actually about a young woman who marries twice for all the wrong reasons, is forced to grow up and do a man's job, and finally realizes that while she thought her happiness was just out of her grasp it was right in front of her the whole time. In other words, it's a love story.
If you want something which is more about the Civil War, yet has side stories going on, I recommend the Blue and the Gray or North and South. Otherwise, go find a documentary.
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5.0 out of 5 stars A brilliant film, Feb. 7 2002
By 
Daryl B (Nashville, Tennessee United States) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Gone with the Wind (Full Screen) (DVD)
I've seen this film several times and I never get tired of watching it. From the brilliant colors and set designs to the characters and costumes, this movie has lost none of what makes it a classic. Vivien Leigh was perfect for the role of Scarlet O'Hara, taking the character from a spoiled youth to a woman, who through war and death, has seen the grimmer aspects of life. Leigh, with those incredible eyes and with wonderful facial expressions is hypnotic through out. Clark Gable, Hattie McDaniel, and Olivia De Havilland perfectly play the roles of Rhett, Mammy, and Melanie but it is Leigh that is really the star of this film. Ashley portrayed by Leslie Howard has always been a character that annoyed me and makes me wonder what Scarlet ever saw in him. You may have to put your politically correct views aside to see the film but by watching it, you will realize what a cinematic classic it really is.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Needs restoration to get 5 star rating, Feb. 4 2002
By A Customer
This review is from: Gone with the Wind (Full Screen) (DVD)
To be honest, I was disappointed with the quality of the DVD version of this film. I've come to expect better quality on a DVD than what I'd see if a film were on television, but I couldn't see much, if any, difference. Maybe someone will undertake a comprehensive restoration like the one done on "My Fair Lady," which is visually "lov-ah-ly" now. Without such a restoration, this version is not tops in my book. Yes, I know it is much older than MFL, but it deserves the top-notch treatment too.
It gets a 4 star rating because the movie itself is so wonderful, you can forgive a lot of other problems. Scarlett is a character you love to hate; Rhett's the racy scoundrel you know will age into a man with more deliberate excitement; Ashley is the passive-but-passionate man who only does what is necessary; and Melanie is the sweet glue that binds all these disparate characters together, even when they don't really want to like each other. A fabulous cast for a fabulous story about an often misunderstood era.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Classic tale of the Old South, Jan. 19 2002
By 
Richw "Rliege" (Lexington, KY USA) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Gone with the Wind (Full Screen) (DVD)
What's to say? It's Gone With The Wind, a classic Hollywood movie. Unless your favorite food group is bubble gum, you need this in your collection.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Classic tale of the Old South, Jan. 19 2002
By 
Richw "Rliege" (Lexington, KY USA) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Gone with the Wind (Full Screen) (DVD)
What's to say? It's Gone With The Wind, a classic Hollywood movie. Unless your favorite food group is bubble gum, you need this in your collection.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Time to defend a classic, Dec 29 2001
By 
Laura Keating (Carol Stream, IL) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Gone with the Wind (Full Screen) (DVD)
Now, I love both this movie and this book. I would recommend it to everyone not only because I think that most people would like it, but also because it's a classic that I think everyone should see at least once.
However, my opinion matters little (except to me!), although many share it. It received 10 Academy Awards including Best Picture over The Wizard of Oz. Both critics and viewers have heralded it as a classic for over 60 years. For those cynics who believe that it may have been a masterpiece for it's time, but is now unimpressive, it was recently ranked the second best film of all time by the American Film Institute, second only to Citizen Kane. It has continued to impress, inspire, and touch people all over. It is regarded as a classic, one of the best films ever made-and by many, the best.
I also have rebuttals to a few of the attacks thrown at the movie. People have been complaining about the length of it, saying that 5 hours is too long to sit through a movie. Well, while I would be willing to sit through 5 hours of a movie that is able to stay interesting for the full length of the movie, Gone with the Wind does not run 5 hours. It runs 3:53 and each minute is important. Also, people have been complaining that it is not shown in widescreen, but the fact of the matter is that wide screen wasn't even introduced until 1952, and wasn't widely used until even after that. The reason they started to release movies in widescreen is because the new invention, the television, was taking business away from the movie industry, so to fight back, they made the movie screen larger than ever, giving people a reason to get out of their houses and back into the movie theatres. One thing I do agree with is that there could be more extras on the DVD. Of course this was one of the earlier DVDs released, before they started getting really generous with the extras, but I do wish they would release a new version with interesting extras.
Of course not everyone is going to like this movie. Is it historically accurate? I couldn't really answer that question, but I do believe that on the whole it is. Does it require some willing suspension of disbelief? Certainly. While there is a lot to say for movies that are accurate down to the tiniest detail, there is more to a movie than that. It is the heart and soul that touches people. And those who watch movies only to scrutinize and look for mistakes are missing the point. When watching a movie-- any movie, it is necessary to let yourself be swept up in what is happening. This is not a documentary, nor does it claim to be an authority on life during and after the civil war. It is a fictional story with fictional characters and events that happens to use the tumultuous time of the civil war as a vehicle for an interesting plot. I can't speak for Margaret Mitchell, but I believe that she did not write the story in this time because she wanted to do a thorough history of the south during the war. I believe she used this particular time and place because before the war started, Tara was a perfect place-the perfect foil to the destruction that the war brought on. To quote (or paraphrase if I don't get it absolutely right) Ashley Wilkes, "Most of the miseries of the world were caused by war." Also, Tara before the war represented everything about Scarlet O'Hara's life growing up. She was, quite frankly, a spoiled brat who grew up never knowing what it was to go without anything. Why would we sit through almost 4 hours of watching a character like this? To see her courage and strength tested over and over again, with her overcoming every obstacle in sight. She may not be the most likeable of characters, but she sure is one of the strongest and most resilient ever to grace the screen, and that is something we can admire. Of course, Scarlet is not the only reason to watch this film. In fact, people would probably argue that her character is the worst part of the film (although I would disagree). This movie is about the people of an era. About who can survive hardships and why. Other characters, such as Rhett, Melanie, and Ashley (who people often critique as being one-dimensional-and again, I would disagree), Ellen O'Hara (Scarlet's mother), or Gerald O'Hara (Scarlet's father), the servants, or countless other less appreciated but noble characters such as Ashley's father that remain in the background of the film, make it worth watching. Plus, to see how much the world changed just in one generation humbles me. Not only that, but I would recommend the movie to anyone if just to see the beautiful costumes and scenery!
Whatever the reason, this is a movie one should see. Some people just won't like it and, while I disagree with them, they are not wrong unless they say that the movie sucks or was poorly made. There are just too many sources that disagree with that. Speaking as an 18-year-old girl (who has loved the movie for at least 8 or 9 years), I believe that my generation has become so accustomed to bad teenage movies that only have enough content to fill an hour and a half that many people's attention spans are just long enough to accommodate that, and they can no longer appreciated a long movie with so much to say. That is not to say that a movie has to be long to be good, but it just so happens that this, along with many, has 4 hours worth of action, wisdom, and entertainment. Watch this movie and allow yourself to learn something.
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5.0 out of 5 stars My all time favorite movie is even better on DVD, Dec 27 2001
By 
This review is from: Gone with the Wind (Full Screen) (DVD)
It is wonderful to see this movie in digital format- the picture is amazingly clear, and the sound is even better. Since this movie is so old, the sound is lower than most movies, but in DVD format comes across very clear. The scenery is also well suited for the DVD format, and scenes such as the wounded in Atlanta are truly brought to new light.
I do think it is interesting that they still leave in the intermission on these old movies. I realize they are part of the film, but it is still kind of funny. At least with the DVD version, you can easily skip this. On the video version (at least the older ones), it is at the first part of the second tape- not a good idea.
This is definitely an essential DVD!
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5.0 out of 5 stars A question, not a review, Dec 27 2001
By A Customer
This review is from: Gone with the Wind (Full Screen) (DVD)
Obviously a great movie, but this is just a question, not a review:
Is the 1.33:1 full screen aspect ratio on this movie the original one? I'd love to hear from anyone who knows. Also on other major, but much more recent movies (for ex. Eyes Wide Shut by Kubrick), why do they come out on full screen? Did Kubrick make it that way, or was it altered, and why? I've been wondering about this for a while. Many thanks for enlightening me!
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Gone with the Wind (Full Screen)
Gone with the Wind (Full Screen) by Victor Fleming (DVD - 2001)
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