Customer Reviews


19 Reviews
5 star:
 (6)
4 star:
 (8)
3 star:
 (5)
2 star:    (0)
1 star:    (0)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favourable review
The most helpful critical review


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Stylish, sexy, and vulnerable
Gere is terrific in this somewhat unusual film. We love him as the ladies companion and as he pretends to be a flamboyantly gay decorator so as not to "out" his client AND as he works the room in search of new prey. His vulnerability to Lauren Hutton is obvious from their first meeting. Gere's character is interesting, intelligent, serious, and good at his job. He is...
Published on Nov. 21 2003 by Alicia Walker

versus
1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Last gasp of Disco
The significance of American Gigalo is capturing the mood of the disco movement in its waning days, and not of a compelling story line that draws you in.
The story line itself is weak, as other reviewers have already panned it. A gigolo is framed for murder, set up by him pimp. Living the cream of life in its riches on his good looks, a murder accusation send his...
Published on Aug. 24 2003 by T. Schmitt


‹ Previous | 1 2 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Stylish, sexy, and vulnerable, Nov. 21 2003
This review is from: NEW American Gigolo (DVD) (DVD)
Gere is terrific in this somewhat unusual film. We love him as the ladies companion and as he pretends to be a flamboyantly gay decorator so as not to "out" his client AND as he works the room in search of new prey. His vulnerability to Lauren Hutton is obvious from their first meeting. Gere's character is interesting, intelligent, serious, and good at his job. He is also compassionate and polite. We leave the movie wanting to take him too! Great film!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Last gasp of Disco, Aug. 24 2003
By 
T. Schmitt (Issaquah, WA USA) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: NEW American Gigolo (DVD) (DVD)
The significance of American Gigalo is capturing the mood of the disco movement in its waning days, and not of a compelling story line that draws you in.
The story line itself is weak, as other reviewers have already panned it. A gigolo is framed for murder, set up by him pimp. Living the cream of life in its riches on his good looks, a murder accusation send his good life down a spiral. Along the decent, he picks up the love of a prominent politician's wife, who becomes his savior and true love, perhaps for the first time in his life.
What makes American Gigalo fun is capturing the last breadth of the disco movement, of the lifestyle of when casual sex was safe, drugs were no big deal, and the music was still dance-able. This was the film that made Richard Gere the movie icon that he is today.
Watch this movie for a trip down memory lane, but don't expect a great story out of it.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4.0 out of 5 stars A flash back to the early 80's., May 22 2003
By 
Celeste M. Harmer (Clifton Heights, PA United States) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: NEW American Gigolo (DVD) (DVD)
As would FLASHDANCE, AMERICAN GIGOLO helped to set the tone for the nascent 80's, though not to the extent that the former movie ultimately would.Nevertheless, as we watch, we see that emerging decade called the 80's unfold. Clearly disco was on the way out and new wave was on the way in, as evidenced by the soundtrack and fashions of this film. Also, you will see portents of the Miami Vice look that would become all the rage five years later.AG probably represented the last bastion of promiscuity and homosexual activity that flourished free of the threat of AIDS. The disease, if it did exist in that day in age, was probably so obscure that it wasn't even discussed even among those in the medical community.AG is the story of Julian Kaye, played by a painfully young-looking Richard Gere, a high-priced male prostitute who services the older, wealthier women of Beverly Hills. Handsome, well-paid, sophisticated, and intelligent -- he is conversant in several languages -- he seems to live an enviable life of privilege and ease.He remains emotionally unattached to the women he comes in contact with until he catches the eye of a cool blonde named Michelle, played by Lauren Hutton. She appears to be his equal in every way, but there is a cloud of mystery that surrounds her that Julian can't quite fathom. They part, and he doesn't expect to see her again until she unexpectedly shows up at his apartment. They spend the night together and come to the conclusion that they are in love.Julian discovers Michelle is the wife of a prominent Senator shortly after he's asked to fill in for a fellow prostitute's gig. The assignment is to pleasure the wife of a million-dollar businessman. To Julian's horror, he reads of this woman's murder a few days later in the paper. His pampered existence is tainted by this tragedy. As his and Michelle's clandestine love flourishes, he realizes that he's being framed for a murder he didn't commit. Who is doing this to him and why are reasons he can't figure out. In vain he tries to obtain an alibi from friends and acquaintances, only to have them withhold help. Then one is promised to him by Leon, a fellow prosititute, but he has his own reasons for vacillating which come to light later in the film. Michelle wants desperately to help him, but she has everything to lose and absolutely nothing to gain by providing an alibi.The plot takes a few twists and turns as the film comes to its surprising conclusion, but one thing that's never made clear, or perhaps I wasn't paying attention, is where exactly Julian was on the night of the murder. It's obvious that he's innocent, but where was he? He may have spent all or part of that night with the wealthy woman who, along with her husband, repudiates him, but I'm still not sure.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4.0 out of 5 stars Darkly comic thriller from Paul Schrader, Sept. 8 2002
By 
Matthew Horner (USA) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: NEW American Gigolo (DVD) (DVD)
"American Gigolo" is high on my list of Guilty Pleasures. This 1980 thriller wallows in the troubles of the rich, the infamous and the decadent. Its main characters have too much money, which can be a good thing, and too much time on their hands, which can be a very bad thing. There is a sort of perverse pleasure in watching them sort through their various problems, most of which are indirectly of their own making. Writer-director Paul Schrader has always cast a cynical eye on human endeavors. Sometimes, his insights have been absolutely brilliant. [He wrote both " Taxi Driver" and "Raging Bull".] But even when he is playing around, as in "American Gigolo", he creates for us an interesting world, which can also be repellant because we see a certain amount of truth in his characterizations.
Richard Gere is Julian Kaye, a very well paid [and apparently well educated] LA hustler. His specialty is wealthy, older women. Arrogant and self-assured, he has made his share of enemies in his shadowy world, especially among his pimps. Things get complicated for him when he falls for Michelle Stratton [Lauren Hutton], wife of a prominent political figure. But far worse is in store for him after a client is murdered and Julian becomes the number one suspect.
Giorgio Moroder contributes a lively musical score - very 80s. John Bailey's cinematography is first-rate. He captures the vanity and vulnerability of Julian right from the opening shots, for example.
This is one of those movies that has more detractors than admirers. To me, it is wildly entertaining in a dark comedy way. Its one big fault is a contrived happy ending, which is diametrically opposed to the tone of the rest of the movie.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4.0 out of 5 stars Put Your Brain on Hold and Look at the Pretty Pictures, June 30 2002
By 
Stephen Kaczmarek "Educator, Writer, Consultant" (Columbus, Ohio United States) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: NEW American Gigolo (DVD) (DVD)
This early Paul Schrader effort is as slick--and vapid--as the city in which it's set, yet still strangely compelling after all these years. Richard Gere delivers his usual flat performance as the titular character, a walking billboard for all that's wrong with style over substance; here, though, his monotone facial expressions and speech actually work, as the character has the emotional range of his condo's designer furniture. Ironically, model-turned-actress Lauren Hutton delivers a surprisingly steady and honest performance as his love interest, despite having to utter lines that often barely rise above soap-opera level in quality. But the real star of the film is the production itself. The visual and aural model for what would become "Miami Vice," the film still seems modern, crisp, and glossy, even with the poofy hairdos, micro-shirt collars and tinny hatchback cars. The story is little more than fluff; Gere's Julian is framed for murder, and Hutton--the wife of a bigwig politico with much to lose if their affair is discovered--is his only alibi. In a half-hearted attempt to infuse some much-needed moral fiber, Schrader forces Julian to confront the many people he's wronged, as well as the empty but expensive lie that is his life, including hints at the character's bisexuality (controversial stuff in 1980). Despite Hector Elizondo's caricature performance as a Columbo-esque detective and the fact that the film celebrates being shallow as much as it condemns such behavior, it scores some hits, not the least of which is the breezy opening song by Blondie.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars Knows what women want, June 3 2002
By A Customer
This review is from: American Gigolo (VHS Tape)
There are very few movies that turn a woman on so much. Most movies about sex show it as agressive, this is the exception: a story about a man who wants to make women climax. Gere sizzles in every sex scene. But aren't some of those scenes clipped inthe video?
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars Richard is BETTER Prostitute than Julia!!!, April 16 2002
By 
This review is from: NEW American Gigolo (DVD) (DVD)
Richard Gere is remarkable as a Male Prostitute in this gritty, but glamorous protrayal of a fella that's lookin' for love in all the naughty places!
I like the crime story element much more than the love story between Mr. Gere and Ms. Hutton...But mostly I like that a typically female role (especially in main-stream cinema) was played by a great leading male.
Recommend this as a Double Feature with Pretty Woman (although I'm not a fan of Pretty Woman for film sake...it's good to see Richard turn the tables on his life...Imagine it as a Prequel to Pretty Woman. It'll give the storyline a whole new spin!!)
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


3.0 out of 5 stars Mediocre crime story that helped launch Gere's career, Feb. 6 2002
This review is from: American Gigolo (VHS Tape)
This is one of two breakthrough films for Richard Gere. The other one was "Officer and a Gentleman", which cemented his status as a bankable star. This is also an early film for mega producer Jerry Bruckheimer (Flashdance, Beverly Hills Cop, Top Gun, ConAir, Armageddon, Pearl Harbor). In this film, Gere plays Julian Kaye, a gigolo who services the sexual needs of wealthy older woman. One of his tricks gets murdered and suddenly all the evidence points to him. Of course, his alibi refuses to admit he was with her because it would be scandalous. The last half of the film is devoted to Julian trying to discover who is trying to frame him. Concurrent with this plot is the story of his love affair with Michelle Stratton (Lauren Hutton) the wife of a wealthy Senator.
The story isn't bad, but the dialogue is mindless and trashy, typified by Michelle's repeatedly begging for sex from Julian in the most profane and explicit terms. There aren't any surprises that aren't completely predictable, and the mystery of who is framing Julian is painfully obvious. The film features Blondie's hit "Call Me", but after hearing a couple of dozen Georgio Moroder variations on this theme on his synthesizer, it gets tiresome.
Gere's performance shows promise here and his generous nude scenes make this film a favorite among his female fans. Gere exudes a smart and sophisticated machismo in this film that would be his trademark for years to come. For Lauren Hutton, who was more famous as a Supermodel than an actor, this role is probably her most notable. She does an adequate job of playing the aristocratic wife with an untamed libido, but is in no danger of winning any acting awards.
This is an interesting film to watch from a historical perspective if you are a Gere fan, but it is by no means a classic. I rated it a 6/10. Weak writing hamstrings a decent story and keeps it from rising above mediocrity.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4.0 out of 5 stars Alternate Title, April 3 2000
By 
J. Reynolds (Houston, TX United States) - See all my reviews
This review is from: American Gigolo (VHS Tape)
The famous scene, and you know the one I'm talking about, prompted thoughts of a good alternative title for this film: American Jiggle.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


3.0 out of 5 stars "A thriller that pursuits purity", March 21 2000
By 
Pochito Juárez (Túxpan, Veracruz, México) - See all my reviews
This review is from: American Gigolo (VHS Tape)
It has been sufficiently praised the whole crew's work in Schrader's interesting thriller, not to mention the filmmaker's ability to deal with an expensive production (headed by recent Armaggedon's self proclaimed pop corn movie producer Jerry Bruckheimer.) It was all in the screenplay. Even though Schrader had made his directorial debut a couple of years before "American Gigolo", with "Blue Collar", his career had been catapulted by the happy writting experiences with "The Yakuza" (directed by Sidney Pollack) and, above all, "Taxi Driver", movies that dealt with characters that seek some form of redemption, particularly thoughout violence. This seems interesting when Schrader's biggest influence has been (along with Martin Scorsese) outcast french filmmaker Robert Bresson. In the fifties, this auteur was forced to manage sounds and acting in a totally different way as it was never before done in world cinema, avoiding theatrical performances and camera movements that could distract the audience from the stillness and the subtle vitality of the actors. (In fact, Bresson denied the use of the word "actor", and prefered "models". He said that, as a director, he wasn't interested in what the model could show, but in what he could hide, pretty much as in real life: we are always careful not to show all aspects of our personalities). Therefore, his work, that portrays so vividly that "inaccesibility" have stood the test of time. When Paul Schrader was a film critic, he lounged for a new kind of cinema that would express feelings with concern, honesty and craftamship. It was when he saw Bresson's film "Pickpocket" that, he confessed, he could not write about any other film. Bresson's movie narrates the misadventures of a would be burglar who uses his time and his energy in robbing people's money, putting it into practice as an art. In the story, there are also a girl and a policeman, and in the end, the main character ends in jail only to realise, in an unforgettable finale, that he has fallen in love. When "American Gigolo" was released it was no secret that Schrader had planned some sort of homage for his movie hero. Concessions were made of course, and the stylish production of the misadventures of a male prostitute, in a story that includes a policeman and a girl, were met by favorable reviews that took "American Gigolo" as "the portrait of a 'call boy' as a bressonian victim" and negative points of view as well. One of these critical reviews considered, not without justification, that the ending of "American Gigolo", which practically is the same of "Pickpocket", was redundant and vulgar. Schrader had made a thriller about an existencialist crisis, about the urge for a spiritual exit (simbolized by the unconditional love of the senator's wife for Richard Gere's character, Julian, who, by the way, is very convincingly acted) and, therefore, about the pursuit for purity. Beauty and purity are what the main character of "Pickpocket" looks for (in the strangest way: through crime), and ultimately finds it with unconditional love. But the final sequence in Schrader's film doesn't quite fit with Bresson's theme in "Pickpocket", where, due to the repetitive images, subtle performances, and strategic extracts of music, the final redemption throughout pure love goes right to the point. "American Gigolo", with its comercial looks, its performances (which are far from the austerity of Bresson),and one or two images of sexual abandon (between Julian and the senator's wife) which I find of very poor taste, sums an interesting display of hollywood professionalism that could have turned into a cheesy movie, if it wasn't for Schrader's genuine affection and enthusiasm for cinema, and Robert Bresson. If any of you is a fan of Schrader's movie, and gets a chance to see "Pickpocket", don't miss it. It's interesting to establish a comparison between the two movies, even more when "American Gigolo" is a worthly effort to watch.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


‹ Previous | 1 2 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

This product

American Gigolo
American Gigolo by Paul Schrader (DVD - 2000)
CDN$ 57.90
In Stock
Add to cart Add to wishlist
Only search this product's reviews