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4.5 out of 5 stars
Introduce Yourself
Format: Audio CDChange
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Showing 1-10 of 11 reviews(5 star)show all reviews
on June 19, 2004
Hmmm. I would guess that the reviews I've seen can be split into those who heard "The Real Thing" (or later) first, and those who were familiar with "Introduce Yourself" and "We Care A Lot". I was clearing out my garage a month or so back and came across this gem. I hadn't heard it in 10 years (no joke) and I was immediately blown away again! This is the sound of a band at the absolutely peak of their powers. The songs are barely contained in their intensity. "We Care A Lot" is patchy but shows promise and here it pays off, big time! In fact, for me, even 15 years after I first heard it, the opening chords of "The Real Thing" still ring in my head, for the simple reason that I thought they'd dropped the ball! From then on, FNM were a rock band, and a great one at that, but here they melded any music genre you could name, and did it brilliantly. Punk, metal, rap, sweeping electronica, it's all here. An awesome band and a, literally, awe inspiring album. If only all music was this good!
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on January 20, 2003
I consider this to be one of the top ten greatest albums of all time.
This 1987 release is more than a decade ahead of its time with its blend of rap, metal and punk, with a soul and a power that blows away today's Limp Bizkits like so many dry, dead leaves.
Why do I love this album? For one, this band has an understanding of the principle of dynamics, something that even technically gifted bands like Metallica tend to lack. This album lifts you to the heights of head-banging ecstasy, fully on a level with newly-appreciated (thanks to Mike Myers) breakdown in Queen's Bohemian Rhapsody-- then it drops you into a cool pond of still water, where you lie, floating for a moment, before being grabbed by the collar and thrown against the wall. All of this is done within the space of a single song, using the most sophisticated and subtle musical devices.
Overall, this album is superior to the band's other efforts, in terms of musical greatness, technical execution and strength of emotion. It is one of those rare, seemingly divinely inspired and powerfully executed works of art that truly warrants the overused and now diluted term of "genius."
The only band today to which I could compare FNM on this album, at least in terms of emotional delivery and sheer power, is the mighty System Of A Down, who has achieved comparable moments of greatness, although not quite as consistently or thoroughly as FNM does on this tour de force. I do believe that SOAD has the potential to put out an album this good some day.
I won't state a position on the "which singer is better" issue. Mike Patton and Chuck Mosley have completely different styles and musical personalities. I will mention, though, that Chuck Mosley provides a raw insanity, beautifully balanced with a sense of humor. His sloppiness, juxtaposed against the iron-fist-in-a-silk-glove sound of the rest of the band, who are all phenomenally talented and expressive musicians, pushes the band to a level that is virtually impossible to achieve when all of the musicians are "smooth," technically precise performers. In other words, his imperfections are an essential part of the album's greatness.
Favorite tracks: The Crab Song and Chinese Arithmetic
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on June 10, 2001
This is the first Faith No More with Chuck Mosely as the lead singer. Now, I'll admit that I think replacing Chuck with Mike Patton was one of the smartest things that FNM ever did, but nevertheless, this album still rocks. Rather than describing Introduce Yourself in general, I've decided to write a song by song review. Enjoy! :
1.Faster Disco - Awkwardly enough this is actually a rather slow song but it's still a good opener with well performed instuments and Chuck Mosely's simple singing capabilities.
2.Anne's Song - Very melodical Bass line with a very cool Chorus and the end of this song will probably confuse the hell out of you on your first listen. :-)
3.Introduce Yourself - A short n' fast song that kicks in immidiately after track 2 is finished which works well with track 2's ending. :-)
4.Chinese Arithmetic - Starts out with a nice instrumental which is shortly joined by well harmonized bass and guitar lines that work with eachother. Good Song.
5.Death March - The begining of this song is a monologue of Chuck Mosely trying to get a ticket for a bus (I think) and then getting pissed and deciding to skate to the beach. Then the actual song starts which is a loud song that has kind of a doomsday feeling to it.
6.We Care A Lot - Cool Loud Rocking song with great bass (which I thougt was deep piano keys the first time I listened) and all the other instruments work together to produce a very good sound. With its lyrics I kind like to think of it as Green Peace's theme song.
7.R N' R - Great song overall with a really oddly but well tuned bass. One thing that bothered me for a while was that this song borrows some lyrics from Chinese Arithmetic(track #4), but I don't mind it anymore.
8.The Crab Song - Begins with what I think is Chuck kicking his girl friend out of his home and realizing he shouldn't have done so for the rest of the song. Then comes a nice loud part!
9.Blood - Has a synthesizer beginning (almost doesn't sound like Faith No More at first) and then all the other instruments kick in. Personally it's not my favorite song but it's still ok.
10.Spirit - Singing with no intruments at first and then the guitars and drums come in shortly joined by the bass which sounds rather ordinary when compared to the other songs. This song's an ok closer (I guess).
Over all it's a good CD and I would urge all big Faith No More fans (Mike Patton fans and Chuck Mosely fans alike) to buy this record.
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on June 12, 2002
...naysayers of Chuck Mosely need to step back on this one. His voice kind of makes me wish that the Mike Patton era could have been delayed just enough for another album. There really isn't a comparison from the first album when you hear how far he had come. Not to single him out, the band also progressed accordingly and showcased enough studio-savviness to break into the majors. Jimmy was getting his chops together, Mikey was hitting harder, Roddy's keyboard as bombastic and full-bodied as ever. And when you look back on it all, it makes the most underground elitist proud that they broke into the mainstream in such an unorthodox fashion. Simply, they just don't make cuts like this anymore.
Then the humor sets in and the impromptu, seemingly improvised lyrics grab ahold of you and, even though they may sound corny, you found yourself singing it to yourself on the bus to school. You had to admit: they were genius' "outside" of thier time.
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on April 23, 2001
Featuring initial singer Chuck Mosely, this album highlights the group as a singular unit, focusing more on instrumental interplay than the pretentious meanderings of later singer Mike Patton. The result is a tight punk/skater record with some progressive tendencies and no shame in singing about transformers, having your fridge raided during a party, and skateboarding to the beach. Mosely's limited range is not as powerful as Patton's dynamic vocals, though his monotone rants are more suiting for this early incarnation of the group. The music is much more percussive and funky than later work. Bill Gould and Mike Bordin's stomping rythms drive the arpeggiated harmonies of Jim Martin and Roddy Bottum. I'm very happy to see this great album just recently reissued by Rhino, as it mysteriously dissapeared from the shelves a few years ago. Hopefully Rhino will soon do the same with the band's first release, We Care A Lot.
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on April 23, 2001
Featuring initial singer Chuck Mosely, this album highlights the group as a singular unit, focusing more on instrumental interplay than the pretentious meanderings of later singer Mike Patton. The result is a tight punk/skater record with some progressive tendencies and no shame in singing about transformers, having your fridge raided during a party, and skateboarding to the beach. Mosely's limited range is not as powerful as Patton's dynamic vocals, though his monotone rants are more suiting for this early incarnation of the group. The music is much more percussive and funky than later work. Bill Gould and Mike Bordin's stomping rythms drive the arpeggiated harmonies of Jim Martin and Roddy Bottum. I'm very happy to see this great album just recently reissued by Rhino, as it mysteriously dissapeared from the shelves a few years ago. Hopefully Rhino will soon do the same with the band's first release, We Care A Lot.
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on November 27, 2001
Chuck Moseley's vocals are very fitting for this record. Mike Patton is an absolute musical genius but Chuck hilds his own here. BIlly Gould's bass rivals Flea on this record there is so much slap funk. Chuck brings a raw punk energy to the record. This is rap metal that is real and ture unlike the garbage so called rap metal bands coming out now. Chinese ASrithmetic is FNM's 1st ever thrash metal and even though Patton sings it better live it worls well here. We Care a Lot is on this record and the absolutely funky Annes Song along with the catchy Faster Disco. Spirit is a great album closer with its funk metal riffs.This is great Beach skateboard Funk music. Pure Punk Funk. FNM sound like the bastard brother of the Chili peppers here
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on May 7, 2003
After purchasing Introduce Yourself mistakenly when looking for that rock/rap song that set it all off, I tossed the disc in the drawer for six months after hearing Chuck Mosely sing "Stylin, you know you are stylin." I thought he was an abomination.
After playing the hell out of The Real Thing and becoming an addict, I gave Introduce Yourself a second chance. Chuck Mosely grew on me, and this cd is just as good as The Real Thing. This is my second since the first one wore out. Is Chuck a good singer? Who cares, I love this CD, and I love Chuck too.
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on April 4, 2004
When people talk about FNM they always refer to the Real Thing onwards, and appear to forget that FNM existed before Mike Patton. This along with We care a lot (their debut) are my favourite albums from these guys. Whilst admittedly Chuck Moseley is not as talented as Patton, his vocals nevertheless have a certain charm about them, as well as tons of attitude. On this album FNM come across like a junior Public image limited or baby Chilli Peppers. Which is no bad thing. Get this album it's an undiscovered gem.
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on October 9, 2003
This album by the young Faith No More is my favorite of theirs. Nothing else really sounds like this, in this way - funk, metal, punk, and sorta 80s electro rap. The entire band shines, but it's Chuck Mosley's bratty punk vocals that really do it for me on this one. So many good songs, so many good lines - I wish this album would find more of a cult following.
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