march boutiques-francophones Unlimited cloud storage SmartSaver Furniture Introducing Kindle Oasis Explore the Amazon.ca Vinyl LP Records Store sports Tools Registry

Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5 stars97
4.6 out of 5 stars
Format: DVD|Change
Price:$5.19+ $3.49 shipping
Your rating(Clear)Rate this item


There was a problem filtering reviews right now. Please try again later.

VIDEO:

The Fugitive (20th Anniversary Edition) escapes onto blu ray with MPEG-4 AVC 1080p 1.78:1 encode. Compared with the completely flawed 2008 BD-25 MPEG-2 (bit-rate at 20.96 Mbps) blu ray release, this new 20th Anniversary Edition is a major step up, and justly placed on a BD-50 disc (with bit-rate 25.29 Mpbs). First of all, there was no distracting use of DNR and edge enhancement, with a natural layer of grain present. The detail is impressive, both in the many closeups of Ford and Jones, and in larger crowd scenes, such as the chaotic chase in the lobby of the Daley Center and the St. Patrick's Day parade. The debris that once littered the film is now absent. All specs and lines caused by dirt and fibres have been removed. The jutter from the 2006 Blu-ray is also missing, with edges of objects now appearing natural and normal. The black levels, which crushed incessantly before, are now deep and rich. This transfer, while not demo-worthy, is vast improvement over its 2006 blu ray counterpart. (4/5)

AUDIO:

Just as the video encoding was upgraded for the 20th Anniversary Edition, so was the audio quality. The old blu ray carried a standard 5.1 Dolby Digital track, but now we're blessed to have an impressive 5.1 DTS-HD Master Audio track to carry us through the film.

The opening credits kick off this great new remastered track. As title letters spin onto the screen and reveal flashlights in the background, the echoing scored tones proudly ring out through all channels loud and clear. James Newton Howard's score is probably the strongest part about this audio mix. Just like the music, sounds effects are also very well mixed. The roar of the water running through the dam sluices accompanies Gerard's chase of Kimble through the drain tunnels, and the police helicopter that pursues Kimble on the roof of the Hilton in the film's climactic sequence can be heard flying around the room. Dialogue is generally clear. The new "Thrill of the Chase" documentary contains a telling comparison of a scene played with and without the score. (4.5/5)

FINAL THOUGHTS:

What is also so fascinating about watching The Fugitive 20 years after it was made is that it comes from a time before widespread CGI, when heroes were ordinary men in extraordinary circumstances, not the other way around. So many big-budget thrillers these days put their protagonists in such over-the-top jeopardy (swinging from flying helicopters, leaping out of exploding buildings in a single bounce, etc.) that they don't seem like flesh-and-blood human beings but superheroes. Watching The Fugitive is still so exciting because for the most part, that's really Ford up there on the screen in physical jeopardy - whether leaping out of the way of a speeding freight train (as you learn in this disc's included supplements) or breathlessly eluding his captors during a crowded St. Patrick's Day parade, this doesn't feel like a comic book - it feels real.

Sharply directed by Andrew Davis and filmed on location in Chicago, everything about The Fugitive works with a clockwork precision. It is one of the last remnants of a now-bygone era - the era of the real-world thriller, one that's exciting and involving and suspenseful not merely because of what the fantastical things its characters do, but who they are. I still have the original VHS tape, plus the 1993 Laser Disc, 2001 DVD and 2006 blu ray disc. Even if you have a repeat dipping history resembling mine (other example being Peter Pan, which I got soundly criticized for by my better half), I still highly recommend picking up this 20th Anniversary Edition. The new 1080p transfer is worlds better than the last edition's and the lossless audio mix is fantastic. All of the original features are included, as are two new Blu-ray exclusive special features. The price is also relatively cheap. This set is a Must-Own.

Finally, as per usual Amazon.ca tradition, reviews of the DVD or the 2006 blu ray are included in the section for this latest version. Please read the date of review carefully before you waste time reading unrelated reviews.
0Comment|4 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on August 18, 2007
this action/thriller/murder mystery is directed By Andrew Davis(Under
Siege)it is intended to be a Harrison Ford vehicle,but the movie is
really owned by tommy Lee Jones.Jones plays a U.S. Marshall on the
trail of a a high profile,respected doctor(Ford)who find himself
accused of the murder of his wife(Sela Ward).Jones brings some great
intensity to role,yet at the same time he manages to be understated.not
an easy task,but Jones is more than equal to the task.this movie is
based The series of the same name from the 60's,but how accurate It is
to its source material is anyones guess.obviously the film has been
updated for contemporary audiences.the movie is quite exciting and fast
paced,with some good suspenseful moments.there's also a few plot twists
to keep you guessing.i rather enjoyed it.for me,The Fugitive is a 4/5
0Comment|One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
TOP 50 REVIEWERon November 29, 2013
Everyone remembers the 1963 series where Dr. Richard Kimble (David Janssen) goes running around in every episode just missing the criminal that killed his wife. He in turn is being chased by Lt. Philip Gerard (Barry Morse) who thinks Kimble did it and is a fugitive from the law. The whole thing was narrated by William Conrad.

Well now we have the movie. This time we have a beginning middle and ending all in 161 minutes.

Dr. Richard Kimble (Harrison Ford) and his wife Helen (Sela Ward) are the perfect couple. Then one night while he was working for some inexplicable reason a despicable person dispatches Helen. On her way to the netherworld she inadvertently says Richard on the 911 call. One thing leads to another and Kimble gets the blame. In the process of transporting him from one containment system to another the transport meets with a little accident; now Kimble is free to locate the real perpetrator. Now it is up to Marshal Samuel Gerard (Tommy Lee Jones) to find and retrieve Kimble.

Now that we have covered the basic there is nowhere to begin to tell how great this movie is on many levels. The anticipation of the chase of Kimble to find the perpetrator (by the way he has only one arm) before Gerard catches him. We get close and have a few read herrings. Tommy Lee gets to keep his stoic look as he says things like "I don't care." And "I don't bargain."

Personaly I think that the Chicago police knew all along who the real bad guy was and was covering for him several times right up to the end. They went out of there way to paint Kimble as the bad guy. Detective Rosetti (Joseph F. Kosala) also tried to stop him from revealing the real perpetrator. Rosetti referring to Kimball even after the truth is revealed "He's going down. You won't help us, you stay the hell out!"
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on July 1, 2004
That is well known sentence from this action hit which put an Oscar in hands of Tommy Lee Jones. Somebody killed dr. Richard Kimble's (Ford) wife, but all clues are against him. After all, who can be stupid enough to say that - One arm man did it?! His escape after bus accident will be his second chance to proove his innocents. But, that will be damn hard. Especially because after him is federal marshal who "doesn't care" about anything, except to bring the fugitive back (by any costs). Kimble will discover that he was in strong net made of lies and conspiracy, and that his only way out is to find proofes to clear his name and bring killer in front of justice. Jones supposed to be a good guy, but you'll hate him all the movie (well, it's not his falt, he's just good actor). Harrison is great, older, but still in good shape. Since Indiana Jones, he never has better role than this. You'll be right next to him, trying to solve the puzzle, hoping that he will succeed to find who ruined his life. Excellent story, good locations and ideas. Definetly collection material.
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on December 6, 2013
For 9,99$ i bought it.Put it in the player,the movie started right away.
weird.
Try to reach the main menu.No main menu.
More weird.
Check the bonus feature and i realise that it was the old blu-ray version.On the back of the box it's written that there is new features-thrill of the chase and a pilot of the tv series made in 2000.Darn warner got it messed up again(harry potter wrong blu-ray version of the first movie---john grisham 4 film favorites they forget the flipside of a time to kill and pelican brief).i took a chance because of the price and because the front cover was in white like the 20th anniversary edition i suppose that it was that version but no.For those who care the old br version contain the french track,the new one seem to not have it.while i'm at it for full metal jacket which version is it,amazon and warner are really not clear about it.Some 90th anniversary,all mixed up in their catalogue.
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on July 12, 2004
What makes "The Fugitive" such a successful and superior film is that it knows what it is: an action/mystery film. It makes no attempt to make itself bigger or more intellectual than it is (as did the American version of "The Vanishing"). Harrison Ford, surprisingly underplaying the role of Dr. Kimball--others might have overworked his grief and angst--turns in a brilliant performance. And the always reliable Tommy Lee Jones does an icy, sparkling job as Kimball's persuer, US Marshal Sam Gerard. So good a performance that he earned a well-deserved Oscar for it.
The other key to the movie's success is Andrew Davis' dazzling direction. He keeps the pace frenetic for a good deal of the film, and the pot is always kept boiling. Close calls and intense chases keep the tension and suspense at fever pitch. "The Fugitive" will endure for a long time as a classic action thriller.
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
Many people point to The Shawshank Redemption as their go to movie for a feel good experience combined with drama and entertainment. For me The Fugitive is without a doubt my number one movie for inspiration and excitement. Harrison Ford always has a knack for finding his way into intelligent thrillers with heart. His Richard Kimble is a good and honest man who finds himself in the worst possible situation - his beloved wife is murdered and he is sentenced to death for the crime. At the same time he is brilliant and relentless; if anyone can find a way out of this situation it is him. Match him with a brilliant and relentless US Marshal who is also a good man (Tommy Lee Jones) and we have a fabulous movie; as exciting as it is engaging. This is a must see.
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on June 11, 2003
This is a very fine movie indeed, and an excellent vehicle for both Ford and Jones (the latter reprising his world-wise character in 'US Marshalls' opposite Wesley Snipes). The action sequences are breathtaking, but it's the drama and build-up of tension that really gives it the edge - is the innocent doctor going to be caught or not? And will he achieve justice? Intelligent and canny, the pressure is never let up.
Best interaction between the two 'adversaries':
Ford (with gun on Jones): "I didn't kill my wife!"
Jones (hands in the air): "I don't care!"
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
TOP 50 REVIEWERon June 29, 2006
Everyone remembers the 1963 series where Dr. Richard Kimble (David Janssen) goes running around in every episode just missing the criminal that killed his wife. Lt. Philip Gerard (Barry Morse) who thinks Kimble did it and is a fugitive from the law in turn is chasing him. William Conrad narrated the whole thing.

Well now, we have the movie. This time we have a beginning middle and ending all in 161 minutes.

Dr. Richard Kimble (Harrison Ford) and his wife Helen (Sela Ward) are the perfect couple. Then one night while he was working for some inexplicable reason a despicable person dispatches Helen. On her way to the netherworld, she inadvertently says Richard on the 911 call. One thing leads to another and Kimble gets the blame. In the process of transporting him from one containment system to another the transport meets with a little accident; now Kimble is free to find locate the real perpetrator. Now it is up to Marshal Samuel Gerard (Tommy Lee Jones) to find and retrieve Kimble.

Now that we have covered, the basic there is not where to begin to tell how great this movie is on many levels. The anticipation of the chase of Kimble to find the perpetrator (by the way, he has only one arm) before Gerard catches him. We get close and have a few red herrings. Tommy Lee gets to keep his stoic look as he says things like "I don't care." And "I don't bargain."

Personally, I think that the Chicago police knew all along who the real bad guy was and was covering for him several times right up to the end. They went out of their way to paint Kimble as the bad guy. Detective Rosetti (Joseph F. Kosala) also tried to stop him from revealing the real perpetrator. Rosetti referring to Kimball even after the truth is revealed, "He's going down. You won't help us, you stay the hell out!"
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on June 10, 2004
If I were stranded on a desert island and all I could have was my abysmally sparse movie collection, I would make sure "The Fugitive" was in it. Thankfully, it is. This is one of the most entertaining and engaging movies ever, far superior to a lot of movies playing these days. For the few of you who don't know the plot, I'll run it past you without spoiling much...
The story revolves around a Chicago surgeon named Dr. Richard Kimball (Harrison Ford) who is convicted of murdering his wife (Sela Ward). He pleads innocent, claiming that a one-armed man committed the heinous crime (the opening sequence, showing the murder in flashback style, is chillingly realistic). Well, no one believes the good doctor's alibi, and he is sentenced to death. However, after his prison bus crashes into a train, he escapes back to Chicago to find the murderer, while keeping away from US Marshal Sam Gerard (Tommy Lee Jones) and his team of deputies.
Having never seen the old TV series, this movie was nevertheless fantastic. The thrills just keep coming, as well as the tongue-in-cheek humor, courtesy of Tommy Lee Jones and Joe Pantoliano (as Cosmo, Sam's deputy), who really steal the show in a lot of scenes. The screenplay is obviously very sharp. The train-and-bus wreck will take your breath away, as will the waterfall sequence. Aside from these action scenes, it's great that this movie is shot in Chicago, one of the greatest cities in North America. Sorry, personal bias, I loved Chicago when I visited a couple years back. The acting is very well done, and the characters are very three-dimensional. Sometimes it feels like you're watching a modern "Les Miserables". Nice transition from action thriller to action-mystery as the film enters its second half. If you follow the plot, which is fairly easy to keep up with, the ending will shock you. All in all, "The Fugitive" is definitely worth the bang for your hard-earned buck. If you haven't seen this wonderful piece of movie-making, do so ASAP.
Quality-wise, the DVD is pretty good. Director Andrew Davis does a cool little documentary on how the train wreck was filmed.
MOVIE-10/10
DVD EXTRAS-8/10
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse