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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Still standing still after all these years
Where does one begin with such a classic film. The Day the Earth Stood Still is the definition of classic. Above average for its genre, the movie still hold its own even today.
Robert Wise did a masterful job directing the picture. Given the fact that he was directing a new and somewhat unknown lead actor in Michael Rennie, Wise did a superb job. Could anyone...
Published on July 19 2004 by Robert Busko

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22 of 23 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars A Review Of The New 2-Disc, 'Special Edition' DVD of, THE DAY THE EARTH STOOD STILL
First and foremost, this is a review for the 1951, black and white, 1.33:1 aspect ratio, 2-disc, special edition DVD and NOT for the remake (Gort! Keanu barada nikto :)

Okay so here's the lowdown; as I now have both this new edition and the original single, flipper disc, version, and having watched all of the bonus features on the new 2-disc set, I can tell you...
Published on Dec 5 2008 by stryper


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22 of 23 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars A Review Of The New 2-Disc, 'Special Edition' DVD of, THE DAY THE EARTH STOOD STILL, Dec 5 2008
By 
stryper "stryper" (Canada) - See all my reviews
(TOP 500 REVIEWER)   
First and foremost, this is a review for the 1951, black and white, 1.33:1 aspect ratio, 2-disc, special edition DVD and NOT for the remake (Gort! Keanu barada nikto :)

Okay so here's the lowdown; as I now have both this new edition and the original single, flipper disc, version, and having watched all of the bonus features on the new 2-disc set, I can tell you this: keep the old disc!

Why, because the 73 plus minute, making of, on the original disc is gone, replaced with a new 23 minute fluff piece that only skims the surface of the story, of the making of this film.

Gone are the lengthy on camera interviews with the producer, director and female lead, replaced instead with film historian's inane babble, with the odd snippet of voice recordings of the director and producer, taken from the 73 plus minutes, making of, from the original disc (without the on camera picture).

Also gone, is the very interesting, "Collectors", segment, tacked onto the end of the original making of, which had several prominent collectors showing off such treasures as the original flying saucer model and Gort statue, used in the actual film, with anecdotes about the film, and where the props they now owned, had ended up after the filming.

As for the extra stuff added to the 2-disc set, nothing is worth the non-inclusion of the original making of from the first disc (most of the new stuff has nothing to do with the film, but instead conveys the political tensions of the world at that time, which, although slightly of interest, is not worth upgrading for).

And on a new extra note for the new 2-disc set, the reading of, Farewell To The Master, is poorly executed, with a static picture with simple playing instructions, present throughout the entire reading (where as they could of has stills from the film playing throughout the reading, while the soundtrack played quietly in the background) and trying to maneuver through the reading is a nightmare, as there are three chapter stops, which are about 10 plus minutes each, with no way of fast searching through the 10 plus minute segments, so if you stop playing the reading at 9 minutes, you can't start the playback where you left off but instead have to listen to the whole thing from the start of the chapter (I know this because I stopped the playback for a minute, and when I hit the play button on the remote, the film started to play, so I had to go back to the menu and start the reading again, and listen to the stuff I had already heard. I would have preferred that an onscreen text version of the short (45 pages - not so short in my books) story be included instead).

So unless you are a completes, then this 2-disc version isn't worth the money, and even if you are looking to buy this for the first time, I'd HIGHLY recommend that you pick up the original DVD release, as the picture quality is the same, and you get the far superior 73 plus minute, making of, along with the director's commentary, picture galleries and original trailer.
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Still standing still after all these years, July 19 2004
By 
Robert Busko (North Carolina) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: The Day the Earth Stood Still [Import] (DVD)
Where does one begin with such a classic film. The Day the Earth Stood Still is the definition of classic. Above average for its genre, the movie still hold its own even today.
Robert Wise did a masterful job directing the picture. Given the fact that he was directing a new and somewhat unknown lead actor in Michael Rennie, Wise did a superb job. Could anyone else have played Clatu other than Rennie?
The premise of the story, a visitation from another planetary system to warn us off our reckless advancement into the nuclear age is very timely even in 2004. Clatu, the alien traveler, needs to discuss the ramifications of our behavior with every nation on Earth but learns that such a meeting is impossible given the petty international squabbling and mistrust of the day. Clatu escapes his captivity in the hospital and moves around disguised as a Maj. Carpenter. He meets Helen Benson (Patricia Neal) and her son Bobby (Bill Gray) and learns about many of our human foibles. Also involved is Hugh Marlow's character, Helen Bensons male companion. Sam Jaffe is wonderful as Prof. Barnhardt.
Eventually, Clatu is shot (a second time) and killed. Gort, the robot, with the intervention of Helen revives Clatu and in a final climatic scene Clatu delivers his message. This is a marvelous film even after 53 years.
The DVD is also well worth the small investment. I purchased my copy at a discount store for $5.50....I should be arrested. I agree with an earlier reviewer that the number of extras devoted to this old film is remarkable.
If you get the chance grab this DVD. Even after all these years the movie is fresh and certainly timely. Also, a final observation. Given the paranoia in most modern movies dealing with aliens, The Day the Earth Stood Still is another perspective on the topic of alien visitations. Its amazing how perverted the whole genre has become. This is certainly a reflection of society as a whole.
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars All time best SF movie, Sept. 9 2005
This review is from: The Day the Earth Stood Still [Import] (DVD)
I just recently watched this terrific DVD at a friend's home.
It has been years since I have seen this movie classic and what a treat this viewing has been. I forgot what a great movie this was. I am definitely adding this DVD to my collection and I vote it the all time best SF movie
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5.0 out of 5 stars The Day The Earth Stood Still [Blu-ray] [2008], Jan. 15 2014
The Day The Earth Stood Still [Blu-ray] [2008] THE ORIGINAL SCI-FI MASTERPIECE

A spaceship lands in Washington D.C., capturing the attention of the world. But the peaceful alien emissary [Michael Rennie] it fails to earn the public's trust. When a young woman and her son befriend him, they soon realise they may be all that stands between the human race and total destruction.

Cast: Michael Rennie, Patricia Neal, Hugh Marlowe, Sam Jaffe, Billy Gray, Frances Bavier and Lock Martin

Director: Robert Wise

Writers: Edmund H. North and Harry Bates

Producer: Julian Blaustein

Cinematography: Leo Tover

Art Direction: Addison Hehr and Lyle Wheeler

Film Editor: William Reynolds

Composer: Bernard Herrmann

Audio: English: 5.1 DTS-HD Master Audio, English: 1.0 Mono, Spanish: 5.1 Dolby Digital, French: 5.1 Dolby Digital

Subtitled: English, Spanish, Cantonese and Mandarin (Traditional)

Resolution: 1080p B/W

Aspect Ratio: 1.33:1 [Full Frame]

Region: A/1

Running Time: 92 minutes

Studio: 20th Century Fox

Andrew's Blu-ray Review - On a bright Washington D.C. day, a flying saucer lands on the grassy fields of a baseball complex, and from the belly of the craft comes Klaatu [Michael Rennie], a humanoid alien adorned in a space suit. Surrounded by military personnel and hundreds of civilians, Klaatu is wounded in an accidental shooting by an overzealous soldier wielding a Colt .45. A second, larger, more menacing figure then emerges from the craft, a robot, with the ability to vaporize the soldier's weapons. Klaatu is able to miraculously recover from his wounds while in the care of human doctors. His wish to meet with the world's leaders is rejected, and Klaatu escapes from this hospital room in search of someone who may be willing to hear his reasons for landing on Earth. He rents a room where he meets Helen Benson [Patricia Neal] and her son Bobby [Billy Gray], whom he befriends, and from whom he learns much of Earth's history and culture. Klaatu ultimately meets with the world's foremost scientific mind, professor Barnhardt [Sam Jaffe], and tells him that his people fear the threat aggressive humans with the power of the harnessed atom may eventually pose to their home world. Will humanity listen to reason, or will Klaatu continue to be treated as an enemy, proving his point and possibly spelling the eventual destruction of all mankind?

To that end, most of the film, and certainly its key sequences and lines of dialogue, reinforces the primary plot. So well-developed is the plot that repeat viewings and critical analysis only reveal its complex brilliance in its simplistic presentation. There are few to no mysteries about the story. Klaatu has been sent to warn against aggression. He is at first and throughout the picture met with aggression from those under the command of the men he has come to meet, reinforcing his statement that people "substitute fear for reason." Time after time his attempts at dialogue are met with either violence or petty excuses as to why said dialogue cannot occur. The film's anti-war, anti-atomic age message is never obscured. Even the dialogue is to-the-point, never straying from message. In one scene, Klaatu informs young Bobby that on his world, there are no wars, to which Bobby replies, "geez, that is a good idea!" By film's end, viewers are left only to ponder the impact of Klaatu's visit and determine for themselves the consequences of further aggression, not to mention the film's obvious religious overtones.

Aside from the success of its to-the-point storytelling, The Day The Earth Stood Still is also a good old-fashioned entertaining movie, not to mention a technical success. This is riveting cinema; each scene leaves viewers anxious for the next. It is both at once fearful and enthralling, offering up edge-of-your-seat tension while playing as gripping drama. Also uniformly excellent is the primary cast. Michael Rennie is excellent as Klaatu, the alien whose power and purpose is matched only by his calm and collected demeanour. His portrayal in the film -- that as an intelligent, handsome, yet purposeful and politely insistent alien in the shape of a man - makes the character all the more chilling yet at the same time, particularly as viewed through his relationship with Bobby, compassionate. Hugh Marlowe, Patricia Neal, Sam Jaffe, and Billy Gray also deliver top-notch performances.

Perhaps the definitive classic Science Fiction film of the 1950s, The Day The Earth Stood Still is a harmonious amalgamation of the entire genre can do right, creating an exhilarating story that both exercises the mind and delights the visual and aural senses. Beyond its simple yet exciting visuals, excellent lead performances, first-class direction, chilling score, and superbly-penned script, is a film that is socially conscious and offers a message on the perils of its day and age. In essence, the film is the very definition of Science Fiction, the picture many astute film historians would likely identify as the high point of the genre, certainly within the confines of its era, but perhaps also in the entirety of the Sci-Fi's storied history, though several other films - Metropolis and 2001: A Space Odyssey, in particular - may wish to contest it as the most influential the genre has yet to offer.

Video Quality - The Day The Earth Stood black-and-white imagery has never looked better, presented here in 1080p high definition and in its original 1.37:1 aspect ratio, which will place black bars on either side of a Flat Screen Widescreen Television set. The movie isn't razor sharp in every shot, but it looks fantastic nonetheless, with an appreciable sense of depth, particularly during the film's opening, long-distance shots of Washington. Detail is particularly high; close-ups of articles of clothing, for example, reveal intricate textures. Blacks are deep and dark, looking particularly good at every turn. The print exhibits some spots in a few places, but the image never greatly suffers as a result. The high quality of the transfer even reveals some obvious wires at a most inopportune time that might be seen as a distraction to one of the film's most crucial sequences. Still, the film has never looked better, cleaner; more defined and certainly has never looked as good on large screens at home as it does here. This is no doubt the definitive home video presentation of The Day The Earth Stood Still.

Audio Quality - 20th Century Fox presents The Day The Earth Stood Still with a 5.1 DTS-HD Master Audio soundtrack, in addition to the original monaural sound presentation. The tracks makes for a nice improvement of the mono offering, sounding fuller and more precise, noticed immediately during the film's opening credit sequence that is accompanied by the haunting notes of the Theremin. The score plays loudly and pleasantly across the front throughout the entire film. As the craft lands in Washington, the reverberations of its power can be felt permeating the entire listening area. The soundtrack produces some excellent lows within the confines of its original mix. Nothing ever sounds trumped up or phony. There is little in the way of appreciable rear channel activity, but the track does feature a few doses of low frequency effects in accompaniment of several crucial sequences. Dialogue reproduction is fabulous throughout. Much like the video presentation, listeners and long-time fans of the film will appreciate the high quality of this soundtrack.

Special Features and Extras:

Commentary by Director Robert Wise and Nicolas Meyer

Commentary by Film & Music Historians John Morgan, Steven Smith, William Stromberg & Nick Redman

Isolated Score Track 5.1

The World of Theremin is a feature divided into three parts. The Mysterious, Melodious, Theremin (1080p 5:40) is a pleasing piece that examines the origins and workings of this fascinating instrument, as well as its place in both The Day The Earth Stood Still and Science Fiction film history.

'The Day the Earth Stood Still' Main Title Live Performance by Peter Pringle (1080p 2:17) features the host of the previous segment playing the instrument. Interactive Theremin: Create Your Own Score allows users to not only create a Theremin-based theme, but to also hear it over a scene from the film.

Gort Command Interactive Game. Players must blast human military and law enforcement personnel using the remote's arrow and enter keys.

The Making of 'The Day The Earth Stood Still (1080p, 23:53) looks at how the film differs from its other 1950s Sci-Fi brethren through its more real-feeling story, the origins, themes, and quality of the film, the career of director Robert Wise, the casting of the key roles, shooting locations, and more.

Decoding 'Klaatu Barada Nikto:' Science Fiction as Metaphor (1080p 16:14) is an examination of how the film fits in with the political atmosphere of the time it was released.

A Brief History of Flying Saucers (1080p 34:02). This fascinating piece features UFO historians discussing the more important and fascinating UFO cases of the past several decades.

The Astounding Harry Bates (1080p 11:03) examines the life and works of the famed writer, upon whose short story the film is based.

Edmund North: The Man Who Made the Earth Stand Still (1080p 14:43) looks at the work of The Day The Earth Stood Still screenwriter Edmund North.

'Back to Oblivion:' A Documentary Short Written & Produced by Edmund North (480p 26:52) is a 1982 piece penned and produced by the film's screenwriter, reflecting his views on nuclear disarmament.

'Farewell to the Master:' A Reading By Jamieson K. Price of the Original Harry Bates Story (1080p 1:36:56) is just as it sounds, the story read aloud, divided into three selectable chapters, against a static background.

Fox Movietone (1951) (480p 6:21) is a piece of archival news footage.

Film Teaser (480p 1:04) Theatrical Trailer (480p 2:09) as well as a Trailer for the 2008 crap remake (1080p 1:47).

7 Galleries: Interactive Press book, Advertising, Behind-the-Scenes, Portrait, Production, Spaceship Construction Blueprints and Shooting Script.

Finally, The Day The Earth Stood Still is a bona-fide classic both in its genre and in the annals of cinema history as a whole. The film epitomizes Science Fiction like few others, creating in the viewer a sense of wonder but also conveying a socially aware message that even today remains one of utmost urgency. Robert Wise's film endures, playing both as timely and entertaining as ever. No doubt, like many other genres, Science Fiction seems to have taken something of a wayward turn, though films like Danny Boyle's Sunshine are able to recall the classic feel of the genre with the updated visual effects of the modern era. Thankfully, no matter what direction Sci-Fi may take next, modern technology allows for the preservation and presentation of these classics like never before, and 20th Century Fox's Blu-ray release of The Day The Earth Stood Still is certainly a benefactor of its high definition release. Audiences may enjoy this picture at the current zenith of home presentation, with a beautifully presented picture quality and several audio options, including the film's original monaural presentation, which make enjoying this classic easier - and better - than ever before. To top it off, Fox has seen fit to load the disc with a massive amount of supplemental materials that alone are worth the price of admission. As such, The Day The Earth Stood Still easily earns my Highest Recommendation. The only disappointment is that there is no Special Souvenir Booklet and with such a Classic Sci-Fi Film, because with the PAL DVD Limited SteelBook Special Edition you had a Special Souvenir Booklet. But please tell me why the 2008 remake Sneak Peek was included, as it is the most insulting film to be included, as it was a total insult to view such crap and as for having this so called actor Keanu Reeves as the main character, is a total insult to the acting profession, as he has the personality of a cardboard cut-out. But despite this, it is a total honour and joy to add this to my Blu-ray Collection, as it has always been at the top of my all-time list of Classic Sci-Fi Films, because it is a well thought out intelligent character driven film. Enjoy.

Andrew C. Miller - Your Ultimate No.1 Film Fan
Le Cinema Paradiso
WARE, United Kingdom
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4 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars a great classic sci-fi film, July 19 2004
By 
M. J Myles "Rosella Ann Myles" (Wheeling, W.V. United States) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: The Day the Earth Stood Still [Import] (DVD)
I remember how intreguied I was the first time I saw, "The Day the Earth Stood Still and still am no matter how many times I see it. It's oneof those few movies you can absolutely never tire of seeing. This is one of my all time favorite sci- fi films and would recommend it to anyone. Michael Rennie and Patricia Neal are great in it really wonderful actors that give excellent perfomrances in this film. The setting in Washinton D.C is perfect for unidentified flying objects like a spaceship to land. The Robert is like a star in the film too. Each moment of the film is suspensful entertaining and keeps you guessing what will happen next. There's not a dull moment in the entire film. It's sci-fi at its best. This DVD adition has great extra footage like a documentary very well done and interesting and a trailer and plenty of other things too. Overall it's an exciting film for all ages.
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars ok, July 26 2013
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This review is from: The Day the Earth Stood Still [Import] (DVD)
My customer was very happy with the DVD. It arrived before it was actually scheduled to do so, so that was a bonus.
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A classic, June 22 2013
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For me, it's really a classic. A very good story and very interesting all movie lenght. The special effect and style show that this is an old movie, but still one of movie I really like.
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars You have just viewed the BEST, March 19 2003
By 
Thomas M O'Connell (Colchester, CT United States) - See all my reviews
This review is from: The Day the Earth Stood Still [Import] (DVD)
I can go into detail but the other reviews pretty much tell it like it is
Simply stated this is the BEST MOVIE with a message that that I have watched
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars "Klaatu barada nikto", June 19 2004
By 
K. Gittins (CA USA) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: The Day the Earth Stood Still [Import] (DVD)
There are a handful of 1950's sci-fi movies that have a big reputation - "When Worlds Collide", "The Thing From Another World", "Forbidden Planet", and "The Day the Earth Stood Still". Unfortunately, the first two are really lame in today's world, and only "The Day The Earth Stood Still" really stands up (except for the robot).
Although it has a little of the hokiness inherent to all movies of the 1950's, "The Day The Earth Stood Still" actually has a good meaningful story. The typically-round flying saucer lands in a baseball field in Washington DC. A normal-looking man (Michael Rennie) emerges, offering a small gift. As usual, the military shoots first and asks questions later. A large robot (to be known as "Gort") emerges and stands guard near the ship. In the hospital, the man requests a meeting of all the heads of world government to share an important message. He is told that a meeting of all nations is impossible under the current state of international tension. After recovering a day in the hospital (and self-healing) the man, named "Klaatu", escapes and assumes the identity of Mr. Carpenter (another patient whose clothes he takes). After renting a room in a boarding-house (run by 'Aunt Bea' from the "Andy Griffith Show"), he befriends a young boy ('Bud' from "Father Knows Best"), and later his mother (Patricia Neal).
Klaatu explains his mission on Earth - to bring about the end of nuclear-arms proliferation - to an Einstein-like mathematician, who agrees to help. The mathematician suggests convincing industry and world leaders to meet to hear the message by having Klaatu perform a show of strength. This is the event behind the movie title when Klaatu stops everything that relies on electricity to operate (though sparing hospitals, in-flight airplanes, etc.)
Klaatu confides his plan to Patricia Neal, who helps him. Later, when they are being chased, Klaatu gives the robot-command codewords to Patricia Neal as a safeguard in the event of Klaatu's capture. As is somewhat predictable, the army again shoots first and asks questions later, so Patricia Neal does indeed need to issue commands to the robot, who might otherwise destroy the world.
The robot recovers the dead body of Klaatu from a jail cell and returns him to the spaceship where he undergoes a sort of resurrection. Klaatu is able to give his anti-aggression message to mankind.
The movie was directed by Robert Wise, who went on to "Run Silent, Run Deep", "West Side Story", "The Sound of Music" and "The Andromeda Strain". Score by Bernard Hermann, famous from a long list of Alfred Hitchcock movies, but also for "Citizen Kane" and "The Magnificent Ambersons" prior to "The Day The Earth Stood Still".
The reasonably-priced DVD has the restored black-and-white full-screen movie; a good "making of" documentary; a commentary with director Robert wise and Nicholas Meyer; some "Movie-Tone News" clips from 1951 having to do with a peace treaty, the Korean war, a beauty contest, and an honorary promotional award given to Klaatu (but a different actor in the suit); a restoration comparison; still gallery including the script; and some other goodies.
Highly recommended. Klaatu's message is still valid.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Science Fiction Classic, April 10 2010
By 
Terry J. Hinkley "Amazadict" (Edmonton, Alberta Canada) - See all my reviews
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One of the best Science Fiction Movies of all time "D.E.S.S" never shows it's age. Story wise that is. Sure the special effects are not I.L.A.M calibre, but for the time they were state of the art. The STORY is what makes the movie. Harry Bates story is turned into movie magic by Edmund Norths screenplay.
Mankind is warned (Once again) that if they do not change their ways that it will lead to their destruction. If not by their own hand then by Michael Rennies. Patricia Neal over does it at the end of the movie, but I think that has more to do with Robert Wise' Direction than her acting. I think he wanted a bit more scare factor for the audience. I do not want to give away any more of the movie than necessary for those who have not seen it. Just to say it was a Timeless piece of celluloid then and plastic now.
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The Day the Earth Stood Still [Import]
The Day the Earth Stood Still [Import] by Robert Wise (DVD - 2004)
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