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5.0 out of 5 stars Come on, (explicit)! You's a Man a Minute Ago!
After successfully showing their international audience how technotronic music and themes from The Dark Crystal could energize dancefloors (and N2O - The Playstation videogame using Vegas as a soundtrack) and move minds, the Method decided to release the much anticipated Tweekend. It took a while to make to get it to me, too, and I found myself waiting eagerly for it to...
Published on Jan. 16 2004 by TorridlyBoredShopper

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3.0 out of 5 stars Not that bad
This is Crystal Methods's second album "Tweekend" it took them almost 5 years to come up with a follower to the great "Vegas", unfortunately this isn't as good as their debut. "Tweekend" is not that bad, it got it's moments but only a few great one's compared to what i've expected. It's very noisy too, very rock influented but with a addition...
Published on April 12 2004 by Josephll


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4.0 out of 5 stars A strong second album., June 15 2004
This review is from: Tweekend (W/1 Hidden Track) (Audio CD)
The Crystal Method's debut album, Vegas, is widely hailed as a classic, and appropriately so. The gritty and hip yet epic CD redefined what the "American techno" sound was, and made quite a name for the Method. Tweekend is their follow-up.
It's no Vegas, but as another reviewer here aptly put, "Did you really want it to be?" Tweekend is all attitude, something the opening track PHD makes sure you're VERY aware of from the get-go. The Method seems to have developed a love affair with the electric guitar and bass during their time since Vegas, and they wail throughout this entire album. Tweekend seems to follow a louder, stronger, harder doctrine, only really slowing down during Over The Line and Ten Miles Back (and even then, just barely). Fans of Vegas need not worry, however. Despite the massive changes to their sound during the first half of the CD, the second half drops into a more "classic" and electronic sounding style akin to Vegas. Never sounds like Vegas, mind you, but it sounds a bit more familiar to those looking for it.
Hip, aggressive and in-your-face, Tweekend is the kind of album that gives neighbors serious headaches. Tracks like The Winner, Roll It Up and Blowout scream to be driven (quickly) to, and would be very at home in a BMW, Audi, or Mitsubishi commercial. Ready For Action and Name Of The Game pump enough adrenaline into your speakers to make you want to start doing push-ups or shadow-box in your living room. Tweekend is Vegas' evil little brother, the one who wants amps that go to 11 on a volume scale of 1 to 10, and the one who has no problem throwing a major big beat party, with or without you.
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3.0 out of 5 stars Not that bad, April 12 2004
This review is from: Tweekend (W/1 Hidden Track) (Audio CD)
This is Crystal Methods's second album "Tweekend" it took them almost 5 years to come up with a follower to the great "Vegas", unfortunately this isn't as good as their debut. "Tweekend" is not that bad, it got it's moments but only a few great one's compared to what i've expected. It's very noisy too, very rock influented but with a addition of some hip hop flavours too. Tom Morello and Scott Weiland appears on the album which is quite interesting to hear. The songs to check are "PHD" which is a great electro song with robotic voices, "Name of the game" noicy song with scratching and a mix between hip hop and rock, Not one of my favorites but notable. "Ten miles back" heavy drums and a very unique sound. "Over the line" which is slow, the only song. The rest are quite mediocre at best. The album is not bad at all like many say but compared to their last album it's a dissapointment. Still a good album, if you're into electronica.
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3.0 out of 5 stars "Calling all FREAKS!", Jan. 26 2004
By A Customer
This review is from: Tweekend (W/1 Hidden Track) (Audio CD)
"Tweekend", the long awaited follow-up to the Crystal Method's successful debut "Vegas", failed to capture the same success as it's predecessor, but is still worth a listen. I gave the disc 3 stars, but it's more like 3.5. "Tweekend" features 2 stand out tracks that, in my opionion, are worth the price of admission alone. "PHD", the discs first track, is a raw powerful groove filled journey through what sounds like an electronic wasteland. If there could be such a thing as "heavy" dance music, this is it. "PHD" starts the CD off with a promising bang, but then the disc just falls short to capture the listener's ears again until "Name of the Game" kicks in. Still to this day, "Name of the Game" is the best use of hip hop elements I've ever heard in electronic dance music/techno....period! "Name of the Game" is a massive audio attack on the senses and delivers that powerful wall of sound heard throughout "Vegas" that TCM fans love. However, the rest of the disc feels like the band just used their time, and money, to experiment and try different things (guest vocalists, etc..), but fail to come up with anything memorable that really gets the listener's attention. Is "Tweekend" a miserable CD? No, not at all. It has some powerful moments, but lacks powerful songs. It's the type of CD you'll end up loving 1 or 2 tracks from and dismiss the rest as "filler". For more great techno/electronica in the same hard style as the Crystal Method, I highly recommend mr.deviant's "Techno Obsession". If "Tweekend" fails to satisfy your hunger for agressive, hard dance music, then "Techno Obsession" will deliver the goods!
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5.0 out of 5 stars Come on, (explicit)! You's a Man a Minute Ago!, Jan. 16 2004
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TorridlyBoredShopper "T(to the)B(to the)S" ("Daddy Dagon's Daycare" - Proud Sponsor of the Little Tendril Baseball Team, USA) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Tweekend (W/1 Hidden Track) (Audio CD)
After successfully showing their international audience how technotronic music and themes from The Dark Crystal could energize dancefloors (and N2O - The Playstation videogame using Vegas as a soundtrack) and move minds, the Method decided to release the much anticipated Tweekend. It took a while to make to get it to me, too, and I found myself waiting eagerly for it to fall into my lap because I knew it would be good. And, quite honestly, I found myself happy with what they had constructed following the success they'd already established themselves as.
Scott Kirkland and Ken Jordon are one of those rare acts that actually seem to understand that star power doesn't mean you have to go with the glitter and the gloss. When Tweekend initially dropped, it came with an award of free passes to meet the duo backstage and I happened across one of those wonderful prizes. So, after a show that comprised almost all of their older hits and most of their newer album, I met the two and they were really a far cry from what one would expect from people producing quality material. Their energy level was there, mind you, and so was the creativity that you can feel flowing through the speakers when you play a little of their album. So, in that sense, it wasn't so unusual for a pair of people enjoying their music and actually giving something to it, too. What was interesting was that they seemed like people that enjoyed making music and that poured themselves into that tinderbox, taking all that time to actually make something and make it right. It wasn't about being seen but rather being heard. And I liked that about them.
For anyone that's never listened to the band, they have a way with beats that makes a person want to shed your boring pace. Coupling sounds that filter through the body and that incubate somewhere in the "makes you want to move" section of the mind, they throw in build and body, bulking up songs with the power of lyrics that sometimes explore and sometimes trip to the sounds that pump you up. They understand how to do that with skills they honed on Vegas, taking an already toutable product and making it better to levels I find had to express. In some songs that meant layering the beat a little more, and in other songs that meant laying down claims that seem to want to stand up and bash someone's face in. Its like they took an idea and they layered it with attitude, making some songs actually make you feel the energy that states, "come on (explicit), you's a man just a minute ago" (as taken from Tough Guy) and "(explicit) true caliber pimp status (PHD)."
I'm not sure I'd classify one section of this album as better than another section of it, but I would go as far as to say that were certain portions of this album that spoke to me more soundly than others. Were I to want to beat someone down, for instance, I might turn to PHD or Tough Guy before doing so because they make these oganic particals feel like they are empowered. I also think that Name of the Game was a great choice to drop off the album, and that Ten Miles Back made me want filtered through me like an electronically synthesized drug. Regardless, however, there's a minute for ever mood and the whole of the flow is a contagion. For those reasons and because these sounds are some of the best ways to spend even the most exploratory of Tweekends, I highly recommend it.
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5.0 out of 5 stars If it gets any better than this, I don't care., July 29 2002
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This review is from: Tweekend (W/1 Hidden Track) (Audio CD)
The Crystal Method's debut album, Vegas, was a stunning work which sought to combine the frenetic pace of breakbeat techno with the hypnotic vibe of trance to simulate the drug-induced haze that has come to be associated with the genre of electronic music. That was in 1997. Fast forward four years to the summer of 2001. The electronica boom has ended, and mainstream radio is pretty much devoid of any song without lyrics. It is from here that TCM make their triumphant return with Tweekend, an album that is just as artistically successful as Vegas, and even more accessable.
On the first listen, it sounds as though TCM has been listening to the Prodigy's "Fat of the Land" albums. The guitars and guitar samples are much more prevalent than those in Vegas, and much of the album has the aggressive qualities of hard rock. However, this is probably due less to the influence of Liam Howlett, and more to the prescence of former Rage Against the Machine guitarist Tom Morello, who co-produced "PHD," "Wild, Sweet, and Cool," and "The Name of the Game," and performed on the latter two. His prescence gives TCM a sense of how to create crossover appeal with the rock crowd (particularly in "The Name of the Game" which was the obvious choice for a lead single), and this element doesn't do any harm to the album as a whole. Scott Weiland also makes a very effective contribution on vocals in "Murder."
Of course, there is plenty here to please fans of Vegas. The vocalist on "Ten Miles Back" is sure to remind anyone who owns the debut of the fantastic Trixie Reiss, and "Blowout" also stikes me as having a similar vibe to the first album.
All in all, this album is a resounding triumph for one of the best electronic acts in America.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Relentless beat assault!, May 21 2002
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This review is from: Tweekend (W/1 Hidden Track) (Audio CD)
Crystal Method have upped things since their last time out with their first album "Vegas"..This here is a quite different proposition, a groove assault of the highest order comparable to a Prodigy gone a bit "discoid" but without losing the merciless beats!!!!
"Tweekend" kicks and roars in every track with no let down.There are no fillers here to mess with, this is basically an all out, balls-on, high quality club album.
You get gut-wrenching guitars mixed with in-yer-face beats. What is impossible is to keep from not moving while listening to it as this album finds Crystal Method at their most dynamic and energising form.
More descriptions? Most of the trax on offer could easily accompany high speed video games or action films, and there's no DJ with a genuine feeling for intelligent hard pumpin' grooves that could omit the "Method" from his program.
The "Name of the game" and "Over the line" stand out -allthough making a choice over so many good tracks is really not easy- with the first being basically a Beastie Boys meeting Prodigy meet Filter and going to a metal bar and the second being a definitive dark club track hymn that leaves you in awe no matter how offen you spin it.
Gorgeous stuff...
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5.0 out of 5 stars My favorite album of 2001, and 2002 so far, April 3 2002
By 
Ivan Drucker (New York, NY USA) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Tweekend (W/1 Hidden Track) (Audio CD)
I suppose if I were a huge fan of Vegas, I could see being disappointed by this album, because it is quite different. But I was always vaguely neutral towards the first album -- I never wanted to listen to it from beginning to end, and I never really got excited after the amazing first track. In short, it was a good-but-not-great variation on the Chems.
What makes Tweekend special is the attention to *sound*. Everything is complex, layered, and arranged very carefully. There are many points on the album where there is a sound that's just so perfect that I can't imagine it being otherwise.
I couldn't stop moving from the moment I put it on -- I was lost in the swirling, subsonic patterns of PHD, and the next two tracks I found equally enthralling. I think just the intro to Roll It Up alone is incredibly awesome (esp with headphones). What's not to like?
I can see electronic music and dance fans being disappointed because much of the album simply doesn't offer the usual beats and sounds. In many ways, they are more rock than dance, and that is one of the things I like about the record, and which sets it apart from much other electronic music. It's not strictly for dancing any more than New Order is. It is much more of an electronic rock/funk album; there are guitars, organs, vibes, and other non-synthesized sounds. It doesn't give off the same electronic sheen that Vegas does. I mean, a rock fan will never mistake it for one of their own, but there's just enough of the influence to make a techno fan feel it. And Tweekend borrows a bit of the noise aesthetic from industrial music as well; some of the sounds just aren't...pleasant. There's a lot of distortion, rumbling, clanging. Cool stuff if you like that sort of thing. I love it myself. Name of the Game and Tough Guy are the extreme examples; the former is basically rock, and the latter is basically industrial.
It's not just in the sounds, though; it's a rhythm thing too. It has been a rule of electro music since the new wave days that the kick drum goes on every beat, 1-2-3-4, unless it is doing something specifically more complex. ("Blue Monday" is probably the definitive example of this.) Breakbeat and d'n'b type stuff generally has a more complex kick drum to funk it up. But what you haven't heard in any dance-oriented music since 70's disco is kick on 1 and 3 only, kick-snare-kick-snare. Why? It's a rock thing. If you took everything out of Wild Sweet & Cool but the drum kit, and slowed it down slightly, you'd have AC/DC. Even the high-hat sound is much more rocklike and organic-sounding; it's not like your average electronic music, for which a machine-like high-hat sound is a signature. But it WORKS here -- it gives songs like Roll It Up a real propulsive thrust, while the richly textured web of other sounds and instruments lay down the funk. I think it's great, but if you're looking for the usual dance grooves, they're not on obvious display.
Some tracks are more conventional (e.g. The Winner, Blowout) which I think actually resemble Vegas a fair bit. I happen to find these less interesting.
There is a ton of detail in the grooves; Tweekend is dense with percussion, and many of the rhythms are less than obvious, weaving and swirling around the central kick-snare axis. And the funkiness itself comes from all the the instruments working together, not just the beat.
As enthusiastic as I am about some of the album (PHD, Wild Sweet & Cool, Roll It Up, Name of the Game, Ten Miles Back, Over the Line), much else I find pretty disposable (and reminscent of much of Vegas in that regard). But the good stuff overwhelmingly makes up for it.
I think this album is probably richest for people who really like listening to interesting sounds and rhythms. I don't know if it offers as much if you're not tuned in at that level. It's a much cleverer album than Vegas, and you can feel the care and creative ambition that went into it (at least most of it).
I've gotta say that this is one of the lowest-end albums I've heard in quite a long time. I've given the album to a couple of friends, and both initially had a "whatever" reaction, UNTIL they listened to it on a good stereo with decent bass, at which point they changed their mind completely. If you don't listen to Tweekend with headphones or speakers that present a deep and accurate bass, you miss half the music, and it's boring. I really noticed this when I listened to it with earbud headphones. (PHD is probably the best example; there's nothing but bass notes.) One of the friends took it with him when he was shopping for a new car, to see how well their stereos could cope. If he heard rattling, he walked away.
Tweekend doesn't really sound like anything else to me; I don't lump it in exactly with Dig Your Own Hole, though that's probably where it belongs. But it also reminds me of the British music from the 80's and early 90's which really fused the electronic with acoustic, rock with dance. Of course, that's not to say that it SOUNDS like those bands (it doesn't). Vegas was very much of the time and now sounds a bit dated to me, as does some of the Chemical Brothers; I have a feeling I'm going to enjoy Tweekend's grooves in ten years as much as I do today. For me, it was worth the wait, and I look forward to what comes next.
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3.0 out of 5 stars Not shabby, but it's no Vegas., April 1 2002
By 
J. Donnici "jdonnici" (Colorado) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Tweekend (W/1 Hidden Track) (Audio CD)
Like many fans of CM, I nearly wore out my copy of Vegas waiting for this album to released. Once it was, I found myself a bit disappointed because it didn't capture the magic that Vegas had. I don't want them to just re-hash that formula for all eternity, but it almost seems like that's the route they took. Some of the production tricks are straight out of Vegas and they don't seem to have really pushed themselves to create some new magic.
PHD and Name Of The Game are good Crystal Method tracks and many of the others are listenable as well. The low point, in my opinion, is Murder which features Scott Weiland (of Stone Temple Pilots) on vocals. I like Scott Weiland and I like Crystal Method, so I fully expected this track to be a favorite. Then I listened to it... ugh. Too repetitive and the vocals just don't let Weiland do what he does best -- intimate vocals with lyrics that have several layers of meaning.
If someone told you to check out Crystal Method, don't start with this one... go directly to Vegas. But if you liked Vegas and want to see where they went from there, this one's not bad. There's certainly a lot worse out there on the scene.
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2.0 out of 5 stars diminishing crystal...., March 27 2002
By 
danny legare (Vancouver, BC, Canada) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Tweekend (W/1 Hidden Track) (Audio CD)
Crystal Method
Tweekend
Outpost/Universal
While Crystal Method's debut Vegas made giant leaps for techno-rock being incorporated alongside the Nintendo Generation and adding clout to stateside dance music, Tweekend is barely a worthwhile sophomore release. With Scott Weiland (vocals on the crunchy "Murder") and Rage Against the Machine guitarist Tom Morello "tweeking" on Tweekend, a more tougher, raw energy lies behind the songs making the band sound more like Limp Bizkit engaged to the Chemical Brothers. Tweekend is straight up rock and (techno) roll. "Name of the Game", "PHD" are dense and delirious with beats and bliss, thrashing distorted guitars and industrial angst, while "Ten Miles Back" and "Blowout" are the catchy, wandering, ambient tracks that do little to save the overall record. Despite the clean, smooth sound of Vegas, Crystal Bizkit did it wrong this time getting into too much keyboard noodling on songs that don't seem to build into anything. There's no tight song structure or even a shadow of the anthemic-like music hooks we've come to expect from the band.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Great CD!, March 7 2002
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This review is from: Tweekend (W/1 Hidden Track) (Audio CD)
I don't know why everyone has such a problem with this CD. It's NOT Vegas. It's NOT supposed to be. Why does everyone think that the only thing Crystal Method can do is "Keep Hope Alive" and "Busy Child"? Tweekend shows that they are capable of so much more. Here's info on every song.
PHD: This song ROCKS. It's very different from most of their stuff, but it's got a contagious beat. Turn your bass all the way up for this one.
Wild, Sweet & Cool: I love EVERYTHING about this song except for the Gospel-style "let me do my thing" lyrics.. they're annoying and very very repetitive. Other than that, I like it a lot.
Roll it Up: I really never listened to this one much, but I always thought it was pretty good. Good walking music.
Over the Line: One of my favorites. The beginning is great and is such a stirring opening that it just works really well. It's not hyper, it's just tranquil and calm. A really great one for nighttime.
The Name of the Game: Granted, they use the F-word a lot, but it's a GREAT song. Bonecrunching riffs and drums unlike any TCM sound you've ever heard. This, along with PHD, enticed me to buy.
Ready for Action: This one moves a bit too slowly for me. It's good, but just not my kind of thing. A bit too repetitive.
Ten Miles Back: This is a good one.. I always loved "Coming Back" on Vegas but the singer is really too wierd on that track. This song is similar to "Coming Back" but with a more interesting singer.
The Winner: A good groove, that's for sure. This is the best walking music on the album. A very solid song that really kicks you back into the spirit of Tweekend if you got a bit sidetracked by "Coming Back", which is very Vegas-like...
Murder: and then it leads to this. This song is HORRIBLE. It doesn't work on any level, the guy's voice sucks, and the lyrics are really dumb. Why did Crystal Method turn poppy? They really shouldn't have made this one. "You know it's hahhhhd.... you know it's mahhhr dahhhhhr..." Ugh.
Blowout: This one saves the album. It's quiet and tranquil, more contemplative than "get up and move"-y, but it works very very well.
Tough Guy: Again, a bit too much with the F-word, but it's really good.
All in all, this is really solid. It works really well, but I can't imagine where "Murder" came from or what they were thinking. Tweekend is not as build-it-up as Vegas was, and the songs tend to keep the same beats throughout, but it seems much more fluid and sophisticated. Vegas was different, while Tweekend is just a really good CD of tried-and-true. It's not really that different from most other stuff similar to it, but it's really good.
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Tweekend (W/1 Hidden Track)
Tweekend (W/1 Hidden Track) by Crystal Method (Audio CD - 2001)
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