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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Woody Knows His Audience
If you are looking for zany slap-stick thrills and rib-cracking laughter, then this is not the entertainment for you. If, however, you want to take a humorous stroll down memory lane or share a stroll with your parents or grandparents, then this is a wonderful film to do it with. The story really plods along with no real aim, just a lot of subplots that loosely tie in...
Published on May 30 2002 by David B. Isbell

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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Very good music, but missing some great songs.
I purchased this soundtrack because it contained some really great music. However, my favorite song, September Song, was missing. If you saw the movie, it was the song that reoccurred numerous times, starting with the wind-swept rainy scene of his home, Rockaway Beach, near the ocean.
Not only that, but that song is near impossible to find now, as I've spent hours...
Published on Jan. 17 2004 by Ron Franks


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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Woody Knows His Audience, May 30 2002
By 
David B. Isbell (San Diego, CA USA) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Radio Days (Widescreen) [Import] (DVD)
If you are looking for zany slap-stick thrills and rib-cracking laughter, then this is not the entertainment for you. If, however, you want to take a humorous stroll down memory lane or share a stroll with your parents or grandparents, then this is a wonderful film to do it with. The story really plods along with no real aim, just a lot of subplots that loosely tie in together, but that is part of the craft of this film. Much like Neil Simon's "Brighton Beach Memoirs" Woody Allen describes life as a boy in the early/mid 20th Century and narrates the film from the first person perspective. It is, in effect, his childhood autobiography. There are plenty of old radio advertisements for previous generations to quote and musical tunes for them to recollect and sing along with. I recently viewed the DVD with an older lady who did this very thing and smiled throughout the duration of the movie. A few times I could see tears welling up as she smiled and recalled her own childhood. I was able to relate to some of it, as it helped me recall memories of my grandparents and even some of my own shinanigans as a youngster. It also appealed to me immensely as a fan of Comedy and Drama. This is not typical Woody Allen fare but, as with any of his stories, it is directed at a specific audience. In that regard Woody has accomplished his goal in flying colors. This is a must-see film for nostalgic types and history buffs; a show to be shared with family and friends.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Nostalgia...ah, yes..., Nov. 1 2003
By 
R. Gawlitta "Coolmoan" (Milwaukee, Wisconsin USA) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Radio Days (Widescreen) [Import] (DVD)
I'm a huge fan of Woody Allen (even his "clunkers"), but this is my absolute favorite Woody film. All of his films are personal, but none as personal and revealing as this...and ABSOLUTELY entertaining. Seth Green, Woody's young character, is perfect, justifying his current success. Wonderful performances from Woody's usual stock troupe (Kavner, Wiest, etc) are all in tune with the goings-on. Mia Farrow, in particular, is a hoot, especially her scenes with Danny Aiello. Woody even managed to squeeze a cameo from Diane Keaton at the end ("You Be So Nice to Come Home To"). Lovely and sweet. It's too bad the Academy eliminated the category for "Best Adapted Score", cuz this woud've won, no question. The greatest songs of the period (1940-1945) were lovingly presented, and anyone who sees this film can't help but be left with a wistful, soft and nostalgic feeling. Yes, this is my favorite Woody film.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A lovely, beautifully produced memory piece, April 15 2011
By 
K. Gordon - See all my reviews
(TOP 50 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: Radio Days (DVD)
A beautifully looking film, both in its production design by the great theater designer Santo Loquasto, and the wonderful photography by Carlo Di Palma, in his first of several fruitful collaborations with Allen. Together with Allen's witty, tender script, and a host of wonderful performances, the film does a terrific job of creating an intentionally larger than life, and slightly surreal memory piece of short stories about growing up in an age when radio was still the king of entertainment.

It's a small, sweet. charming piece. Some of the stories are flat out great, some occasionally feel a bit meandering or pointless, but none are truly weak. The best moments rival Felliini's `Amarcord'. Perhaps not among Allen's greatest films, but still better than 99% of what has gotten produced in the US in recent years.
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4.0 out of 5 stars A standout gem!, Nov. 14 2003
By 
K. Hardaway "khardawa" (Baltimore, Maryland United States) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Radio Days (Widescreen) [Import] (DVD)
I've been hurt in the past by a lot of "classic" Woody Allen films. But this one does not disppoint. I think this is one of his best films. A nostalgic look back on his childhood in the good ole radio days. Although for once, Woody was not the highlight of a Woody movie for me. And I never thought I'd utter thses words in my entire life. But...Mia Farrow was the funniest thing about this movie (and it was a really funny movie by itself). I just loved her eating as people are discussing where to dump her body and my favorite line of her's is upon hearing of the bombing of Pearl Harbor at an inconvenient moment, she asks kind of agitated, "Who is Pearl Harbor?" The second stories would switch, and she'd pop up, I'd already be laughing. And I am by no means a Mia Farrow fan. She was just so broadly funny; maybe that's what she should have done more of. Because usually she plays such dry characters...but this was a welcome change. Woody must have loved her role too. He basically recycled her in Bullets Over Broadway with Jennifer Tilly's ditzy character (also funny). This film was just so real and honest and clearly personal to Woody, that his passion showed in the writing and the acting and made this movie one of my favorites of his (and a young Seth Green did Woody justice too).
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5.0 out of 5 stars Bittersweet Comedy, May 19 2002
This review is from: Radio Days (Widescreen) [Import] (DVD)
The best thing about Woody Allen is his ability to build a movie on episodic material and subplots, without the need for an overarching plot. "Radio Days" is told in anecdotal vignettes, which relate to Allen's memories of radio in the 1940s. These vignettes are seamlessly interwoven, and through them, we come to get a feel for how and where Allen grew up.
Where he grew up was Rockaway, Queens, and -- having been there dozens of times, visiting from my own Brooklyn -- Allen's actual use of the neighborhood locations really places this movie not only in place, but time, as Rockaway Beach has changed so little since the 1940s.
Most memorable are the actors which comprise the ensemble cast: Seth Green plays a young Allen, casted as "Joe"; Julie Kavner and Jeff Tucker play his always bickering parents; Diane Wiest plays his old-maid aunt, Bea. But Mia Farrow as aspiring radio personality Sally White steals the show with her Canarsie accent "Hawk, I heyuh da cannons raw. Is it da king approachin'?" and later blossoms into a radio gossip show hostess, a la Hedda Hopper, replete with a proper Anglicized accent to boot.
Living now in an age when many social critics blame television for driving the American family apart, Allen paints a portrait of a time when it was radio which drew families closer together; all his favorite childhood memories having some connection to a radio program or song, and it is this connection which Allen memorializes, suggesting a time that was not so much more innocent, but one that was more dramatic, classier and less jaded.
DP Carlo diPalma's beautiful use of primary colors and editor Susan Morse's perfectly-timed montage flesh out a gorgeous visual counterpart to the soundtrack, which is brimming over with jazz, big bands, cop dramas, boy crooners, game shows and torch song sirens.
"Radio Days" is, along with "Crimes and Misdemeanors" the closest Allen came to making a perfect movie.
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5.0 out of 5 stars His funniest?, Feb. 12 2002
By 
jumpy1 (New York, NY) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Radio Days (Widescreen) [Import] (DVD)
For my money, this is Woody's most accessible work. The opening scene to the movie is a classic that establishes for any who doubt it, that Woody Allen is indeed a comic genius. The movie itself is basically a series of vignettes set during the depression in New York and the boroughs, moving in and out of the lives of a radio-addicted boy growing up in Coney Island to a young woman trying to make it in show business, to the more glamorous lives of entertainers during that time. It's all held together by the boy, who tells his story along with anecdotes about show business personalities from the radio or local gossip. At times, it hilariously contrasts his innocently starstruck interpretation of celebrity gossip and radio shows (he talks in voiceover) as the scene before you is what was more likely the truth! It's beautiful as a period piece. I remember this film being a huge hit and don't understand the reviewers who say it was misunderstood. It's such straightforward comedy that I don't see how anyone would misunderstand it. And, most of the people I know count this as one of their favorite comedies of the 20th Century.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Beware EvilDoers, Wherever You Are!, Nov. 20 2001
By 
GLENN WHELAN (Winter Park, FL USA) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Radio Days (Widescreen) [Import] (DVD)
RADIO DAYS is not much of a narrative film but a rather beautiful collection of childhood memories and urban legends. the episodic nature is delicately woven and supported by wonderful vintage music as well as the largest production value of WOODY ALLEN's career. The film is always entertaining, often funny but not afraid to bring a tear as we see the story of a young girl stuck in a well, and the effect on the listening audience. WOODY only appears as the narrative voice of the film while SETH GREEN (Austin Powers) plays the narrator as a boy. Many of teh Allen regulars are here including a return of Diane Keaton (ANNIE HALL) for a nice song. His family is very enrolling, from the desperate aunt (Wonderful Dianne Wiest) to the Uncle with a thing for fresh fish... Watch for WILLIAM H MACY (FARGO) in a silent role as a radio performer preempted by Pearl Harbor. A beautiful film that suffers the same fate as the radio stories it illuminates... Who remembers radio anymore? Fewer amd fewer every day... There's no room for Howard Stern in this film. Great cinematography is nicely transferred into the widescreen DVD as well as a wonderful soundtrack. RADIO DAYS is available in the 3rd WOODY ALLEN box set.
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5.0 out of 5 stars One of Woody's Most Underrated Films, Oct. 9 2001
This review is from: Radio Days (Widescreen) [Import] (DVD)
One of Woody Allen's most underrated outings, "Radio Days" is a tremendously funny film which depicts the grip that radio had on America during World War II. While void of an actual plot, "Radio Days" succeeds as a series of vignettes involving a loud, comical New York family whose lives are enlightened by an array of music, sporting events and soap operas which reach their home by way of static-filled airwaves. Long before TV and the Internet, radio was the only source of popular culture in many American homes. Family members who fought constantly (And boy do they fight in "Radio Days"!), always found time to bond around the big radio cabinet in the kitchen or living room. In typical Allen fashion, the dialogue and characters are delightfully over the top. The cast -- Michael Tucker, Julie Kavener, Seth Green, Mia Farrow -- are stellar and perfectly suited for the outrageous script. The real charm of the film is Allen's witty take on War-era radio shows. Everything from Superheroes to a radio ventriloquist (think about it...) are spoofed in way that only Woody can spoof. Of course, classic songs from the 1940's gloriously re-reate the romance and charm of a bygone era. While "Radio Days" may not be as "important" as "Annie Hall" or "Manhattan", it is a wonderfully entertaining film which bares all the trademarks of a Woody Allen classic.
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5.0 out of 5 stars The Best Woody Allen film of them all., April 7 2002
By A Customer
This review is from: Radio Days (Widescreen) [Import] (DVD)
I love Woody Allen and his crazy sense of humor. I know that some people find him (at times) a little far out, but this movie should be loved by everyone with a family and a radio. The music is the background of the WW2 generation and their children. It reminds me very much of my parents and all my relatives. It is little episodes in the life of a 8 year old boy but told in a way that all of us can relate to. I live in Florida, and a few years ago on my birthday, we were under a Hurricane watch.........a whole crew of my family of all ages gathered at my house to wait. Trying to find something to entertain everyone was a real challenge. After a bunch of false starts on other movies everyone was getting edgy until we put on Radio Days. It calmed everyone down and cheered them up, made them laugh--the movie was a hit ( and the hurricanne missed us). The casting was great. All of Woody's regulars and some other talents too. I love it.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Radio Days in your own home, May 29 2001
By 
Annie Marshak (Ann Arbor, MI United States) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Radio Days (Audio CD)
This CD soundtrack is fabulous. Just listening to the music selections from Woody Allen's motion picture "Radio Days" brings you back to an era long gone - the 1930s and 1940s - when Americans listened to the radio for their music and entertainment. The CD starts off with a bang, getting you into the mood with Glenn Miller's "In the Mood", and ends up with a terrific Conga-line number. Other songs I love are "I Double Dare You" and "Remember Pearl Harbor". This soundtrack is missing a few songs that were part of the classic moments in the movie (South American Way" by Carmen Miranda, and "Ba Ba Lou"), but I'm willing to over look this. I've spent many happy hours listening to this and it's one of my favorite soundtrack CDs. Hopefully you'll enjoy this CD as much as I do.
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Radio Days (Widescreen) [Import]
Radio Days (Widescreen) [Import] by Woody Allen (DVD - 2003)
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