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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A lovely, beautifully produced memory piece
A beautifully looking film, both in its production design by the great theater designer Santo Loquasto, and the wonderful photography by Carlo Di Palma, in his first of several fruitful collaborations with Allen. Together with Allen's witty, tender script, and a host of wonderful performances, the film does a terrific job of creating an intentionally larger than life, and...
Published on April 15 2011 by K. Gordon

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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars A VIEW OF THE GOOD OLD RADIO DAYS
CUTE MOVIE. THATS IT. LOVE THE MUSIC BUT I CERTAINLY WOULD NOT SUGGEST IT AS A GREAT MOVIE. THERE MUST BE ANOTHER MOVIE OUT THERE THAT IS BETTER ABOUT RADIO DAYS.
Published 3 months ago by daisy M


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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A lovely, beautifully produced memory piece, April 15 2011
By 
K. Gordon - See all my reviews
(TOP 50 REVIEWER)    (REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Radio Days (DVD)
A beautifully looking film, both in its production design by the great theater designer Santo Loquasto, and the wonderful photography by Carlo Di Palma, in his first of several fruitful collaborations with Allen. Together with Allen's witty, tender script, and a host of wonderful performances, the film does a terrific job of creating an intentionally larger than life, and slightly surreal memory piece of short stories about growing up in an age when radio was still the king of entertainment.

It's a small, sweet. charming piece. Some of the stories are flat out great, some occasionally feel a bit meandering or pointless, but none are truly weak. The best moments rival Felliini's `Amarcord'. Perhaps not among Allen's greatest films, but still better than 99% of what has gotten produced in the US in recent years.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Radio Days, March 14 2014
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This review is from: Radio Days (DVD)
I have always loved this movie and I had been looking for a replacement of my old VCR cassette and this Disc was just what I've always been looking for. I Recommend this movie to everybody.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Woody Knows His Audience, May 30 2002
By 
David B. Isbell (San Diego, CA USA) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Radio Days (Widescreen) [Import] (DVD)
If you are looking for zany slap-stick thrills and rib-cracking laughter, then this is not the entertainment for you. If, however, you want to take a humorous stroll down memory lane or share a stroll with your parents or grandparents, then this is a wonderful film to do it with. The story really plods along with no real aim, just a lot of subplots that loosely tie in together, but that is part of the craft of this film. Much like Neil Simon's "Brighton Beach Memoirs" Woody Allen describes life as a boy in the early/mid 20th Century and narrates the film from the first person perspective. It is, in effect, his childhood autobiography. There are plenty of old radio advertisements for previous generations to quote and musical tunes for them to recollect and sing along with. I recently viewed the DVD with an older lady who did this very thing and smiled throughout the duration of the movie. A few times I could see tears welling up as she smiled and recalled her own childhood. I was able to relate to some of it, as it helped me recall memories of my grandparents and even some of my own shinanigans as a youngster. It also appealed to me immensely as a fan of Comedy and Drama. This is not typical Woody Allen fare but, as with any of his stories, it is directed at a specific audience. In that regard Woody has accomplished his goal in flying colors. This is a must-see film for nostalgic types and history buffs; a show to be shared with family and friends.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Nostalgia...ah, yes..., Nov. 1 2003
By 
R. Gawlitta "Coolmoan" (Milwaukee, Wisconsin USA) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Radio Days (Widescreen) [Import] (DVD)
I'm a huge fan of Woody Allen (even his "clunkers"), but this is my absolute favorite Woody film. All of his films are personal, but none as personal and revealing as this...and ABSOLUTELY entertaining. Seth Green, Woody's young character, is perfect, justifying his current success. Wonderful performances from Woody's usual stock troupe (Kavner, Wiest, etc) are all in tune with the goings-on. Mia Farrow, in particular, is a hoot, especially her scenes with Danny Aiello. Woody even managed to squeeze a cameo from Diane Keaton at the end ("You Be So Nice to Come Home To"). Lovely and sweet. It's too bad the Academy eliminated the category for "Best Adapted Score", cuz this woud've won, no question. The greatest songs of the period (1940-1945) were lovingly presented, and anyone who sees this film can't help but be left with a wistful, soft and nostalgic feeling. Yes, this is my favorite Woody film.
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4.0 out of 5 stars A lovely, beautifully produced memory piece, April 15 2011
By 
K. Gordon - See all my reviews
(TOP 50 REVIEWER)    (REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Radio Days (Widescreen) [Import] (DVD)
A beautifully looking film, both in its production design by the great theater designer Santo Loquasto, and the wonderful photography by Carlo Di Palma, in his first of several fruitful collaborations with Allen. Together with Allen's witty, tender script, and a host of wonderful performances, the film does a terrific job of creating an intentionally larger than life, and slightly surreal memory piece of short stories about growing up in an age when radio was still the king of entertainment.

It's a small, sweet. charming piece. Some of the stories are flat out great, some occasionally feel a bit meandering or pointless, but none are truly weak. The best moments rival Felliini's `Amarcord'. Perhaps not among Allen's greatest films, but still better than 99% of what has gotten produced in the US in recent years.
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4.0 out of 5 stars A standout gem!, Nov. 15 2003
By 
K. Hardaway "khardawa" (Baltimore, Maryland United States) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Radio Days (Widescreen) [Import] (DVD)
I've been hurt in the past by a lot of "classic" Woody Allen films. But this one does not disppoint. I think this is one of his best films. A nostalgic look back on his childhood in the good ole radio days. Although for once, Woody was not the highlight of a Woody movie for me. And I never thought I'd utter thses words in my entire life. But...Mia Farrow was the funniest thing about this movie (and it was a really funny movie by itself). I just loved her eating as people are discussing where to dump her body and my favorite line of her's is upon hearing of the bombing of Pearl Harbor at an inconvenient moment, she asks kind of agitated, "Who is Pearl Harbor?" The second stories would switch, and she'd pop up, I'd already be laughing. And I am by no means a Mia Farrow fan. She was just so broadly funny; maybe that's what she should have done more of. Because usually she plays such dry characters...but this was a welcome change. Woody must have loved her role too. He basically recycled her in Bullets Over Broadway with Jennifer Tilly's ditzy character (also funny). This film was just so real and honest and clearly personal to Woody, that his passion showed in the writing and the acting and made this movie one of my favorites of his (and a young Seth Green did Woody justice too).
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4.0 out of 5 stars classic woody, July 5 2003
By A Customer
This review is from: Radio Days (Widescreen) [Import] (DVD)
That special blend of comedic, melancholic ideal world haze---when he gets it correctly, it is great! This is one of those Allen movies that sucks you into the remembered world, sepia toned, more than slightly un-realistic! But how realistically did we think when we were kids anyways! Great flick.
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5.0 out of 5 stars heart warming woody, June 11 2002
By 
John J. Sviokla (chicago, il) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Radio Days (Widescreen) [Import] (DVD)
if not one of his best films, this is certianly one of woody allen's warmest. In this film we finally get to see the warm vuldernrable, and sensitive Allen that is hinted to and alluded to in all of his other films. It shows where Allen came from and where he got his sense of bizarre and dry humor.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Bittersweet Comedy, May 19 2002
This review is from: Radio Days (Widescreen) [Import] (DVD)
The best thing about Woody Allen is his ability to build a movie on episodic material and subplots, without the need for an overarching plot. "Radio Days" is told in anecdotal vignettes, which relate to Allen's memories of radio in the 1940s. These vignettes are seamlessly interwoven, and through them, we come to get a feel for how and where Allen grew up.
Where he grew up was Rockaway, Queens, and -- having been there dozens of times, visiting from my own Brooklyn -- Allen's actual use of the neighborhood locations really places this movie not only in place, but time, as Rockaway Beach has changed so little since the 1940s.
Most memorable are the actors which comprise the ensemble cast: Seth Green plays a young Allen, casted as "Joe"; Julie Kavner and Jeff Tucker play his always bickering parents; Diane Wiest plays his old-maid aunt, Bea. But Mia Farrow as aspiring radio personality Sally White steals the show with her Canarsie accent "Hawk, I heyuh da cannons raw. Is it da king approachin'?" and later blossoms into a radio gossip show hostess, a la Hedda Hopper, replete with a proper Anglicized accent to boot.
Living now in an age when many social critics blame television for driving the American family apart, Allen paints a portrait of a time when it was radio which drew families closer together; all his favorite childhood memories having some connection to a radio program or song, and it is this connection which Allen memorializes, suggesting a time that was not so much more innocent, but one that was more dramatic, classier and less jaded.
DP Carlo diPalma's beautiful use of primary colors and editor Susan Morse's perfectly-timed montage flesh out a gorgeous visual counterpart to the soundtrack, which is brimming over with jazz, big bands, cop dramas, boy crooners, game shows and torch song sirens.
"Radio Days" is, along with "Crimes and Misdemeanors" the closest Allen came to making a perfect movie.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Great film, May 1 2002
This review is from: Radio Days (Widescreen) [Import] (DVD)
I saw this movie when it was on HBO in the late '80s or early '90s. My father who was about the same age Seth Green was during the war, lived in a suburb of Boston that had many of the same attractions this section of NY had.
I can count the number of times I had seen him cry on one hand until he sat down and watched it. He said the movie was so close to what he experienced during the same time in history. He remembers watching for Nazi U-Boats from the beach, and the neighborhood and family interactions.
Most of all he remembers listening to various shows on the radio such as the Green Hornet, Dragnet, Fibber McGee and Molly, and This is your FBI.
This was a very touching movie and gave me some insight into what it was like being a young child at the start of one of the most important times in history.
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Radio Days (Widescreen) [Import]
Radio Days (Widescreen) [Import] by Woody Allen (DVD - 2003)
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