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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars worderiffic
Fluid runs of timeless lyrics echo through the tracks while guitars tortured cadences attempt to hold them back. An album true, a statement bold, that ages well, like wine. I'm glad that Bobby made it. I'm glad a copy's mine.
Published 11 months ago by eeyoore

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3.0 out of 5 stars Quintessential Dylan
Not quite up to the standards of subsequent albums or its predecessor - Freewheelin' - this is, nevertheless, quintessential Dylan. Angry protest side by side with haunting love songs should have prepared his audience for what was to follow, but it didn't.
Published 4 months ago by Irishcan


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4.0 out of 5 stars Topical, but still relevant today, Aug. 4 2001
By 
Bill R. Moore (New York, USA) - See all my reviews
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On his third album, and first of all original material, Dylan chose to focus primarily of protest songs, in the vein of Blowin' In The Wind from the previous album, but more refined; rather than the cornacopia of styles forged on The Freehweelin' Bob Dylan. This, in hindsight, may make the album less striking and timeless than it's predecessor, but it's still a good album by any means. Some of his greatest protest songs ever are included here, among them the legendary title track, With God On Our Side (an all-time great, anti-war anthem), and Only A Pawn In Their Game. There are some other types of songs here, too, though; the long, pseudo-tear-jerking narraritives of North Country Blues and The Lonesome Death of Hattie Carrol, the romanticism of Boots of Spanish Leater, and the world-weariness of One Too Many Mornings and Restless Farewell, for instance. All in all, this cannot be considered one of Dylan's very best albums, but it is certainly a very good one, and a must for any fan.
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4.0 out of 5 stars One of Dylan's most depressed and emotionally draining works, June 14 2001
By 
Mike London "MAC" (Oxford, UK) - See all my reviews
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Coming off the heels of what is now considered one of the single most important releases from the 1960s canon of music, THE TIMES THEY ARE A-CHANGIN', with only the title cut reaching the classic feel of THE FREEWHEELIN' BOB DYLAN, seems a bit of a let down.
All of Dylan's albums have a certain feel, a certain atmosphere that he works for (even the critically panned 1980s output), and this is no exception. (Even though Led Zeppelin is largely credited to perfecting the art of the album, Dylan was there long before they were, with each of his albums having their own distinct aura and atmosphere. ....) Dylan plods through 10 cuts, every one of them so depressing ...as does the protagonist of the second cut on this record, Hollis Brown. Gone are the humourous edges Dylan had tempered in his works. Now, only the deep morose of a world gone wrong stands out. As I read once, this does not seem to be a natural extension or progression of what Dylan was doing. My own thoughts are he had to go through the folk-protest movement and then go on to rock'n'roll, to go through just one more persona and then cut it away. ....
The only problem with this album is its protest songs seem rather forced. Here, it seems rather self-conscious. ....THE TIMES THEY ARE A-CHANGIN' stands as one of those records you must take in small doses, because if you don't depression will rule the your world. Its overall feel becomes very restricting, and, as this is a protest album, Dylan reaches his goal with this record. ....There are some great compositions here, with "One Too Many Mornings" standing out (recast in the famous "Royal Albert Hall" bootleg and containing the very memorably lyric: "and everything I'm a sayin', you can say just as good, you're right for your side and I'm right from mine"). Even now, he is already hinting at his break from the folk scene, like his subconscious now he can't stay in the protest folk scene for long. Another song I really dig is "A Pawn In Their Game", with a nice rhyme scheme going. "Boots of Spanish Leather" and "When The Ship Comes In" are also good, although the former is a rewrite using the same melody as the superiour "Girl from the North Country". The rest, especially the lengthy "With God on Our Side", are standard folk protest songs, save the title cut which rises to greatness, and "Lonesome Death of Hattie Carol", which becomes a memorable cut in its own right. One of the most memorable lines from "God On Our Side" is the line about Judas having God on his side. The song dates itself with the Russian paranoia, and for some odd reason Dylan chose this to include on his MTV UNPLUGGED record, and did not include the BLONDE ON BLONDE number floating out there in mp3 land, "Absolutely Sweet Marie". The last cut stands as his restless farewell, and becomes one of the first cuts in Dylan's long lines of the last number on his records having special significance.
For those who read the amazon.com review, saying this is just as world-weary as TIME OUT OF MIND, this is true in one sense. But when you listen to THE FREEWHEELIN' BOB DYLAN, the album immediately before, and ANOTHER SIDE OF BOB DYLAN, the album immediately after, you can tell Dylan still has hope for life and a vital sense of humour helps him relate to the world. But with TIME OUT OF MIND, he has lost his humour completely and honestly and is just ready for it to be all over with.
Bottom line: Really depressing, very angry folk protest album, and of all Dylan's 1960s work, excepting his debut, is the worst of the 8 albums comprising his body of work during this decade. It would have benefited had some humour leavened the very deep morose predominating this work, but then the point would have been taken away. Worthy addition to any Dylan collection, although not nearly as listenable as his other 1960s work (again, excepting his debut).
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5.0 out of 5 stars Sends Chills., Jan. 28 2001
By 
A. Berns (Bloomington, MN USA) - See all my reviews
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Every song on this album is the kind when you hear it, it makes you shiver from the power of the lyrics. The guitar work on this album is all very simple, but that is not the focus. The Lyrics are what is important. Deep songs which noone has written the likes to except Dylan himself .There are protest songs, like "The Lonesome Death of Hattie Carroll", "Only a Pawn in there Game" and "North Country Blues". As Well as some deeply personal songs such as "Restless Farewell" and One Too Many Mornings". This album even has a little Bible reference in "When the Ship Comes In". A Great album in every sense of the word.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Sophomore in HS appreciates Dylan, Dec 15 2000
My dad and aunt acutally turned me on to this CD and to Another Side of Bob Dylan. When I get tired of the loud angry tirades of EMINEM and other rappers, I put on the quieter angry tirades of Dylan. "The Lonsome Death of Hattie Carrol" really touched me and I think all of his songs make points that are still valid today. If anyone is reading my review and you're not sure whether or not to but this cd, I'll tell you buy it! You won't be disappointed.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Bible Thumping Evangelist, Sept. 30 2000
By 
dev1 (Baltimore) - See all my reviews
This is Dylan's one and only 100% protest album: ten angry songs pointing the finger at the establishment and the ills of society. Several are immediately memorable including a nostalgic look at the past (One Too Many Mornings), a lonesome farewell to my love (Boots Of Spanish Leather), and the tragic death of Hattie Carroll (The Lonesome Death Of Hattie Carroll). The message of 'The Lonesome Death Of Hattie Carroll' is reinforced with a chorus that, each time repeated, becomes more powerful. The album has a weary sameness: same tempo, same key, same melody. Political protest doesn't stand well with the test of time, because "the times they are a-changin." A sign reading "The Times They Are A-Changin" looks quaint at a left-wing rally, but it is a dumb song. Ask you dad, your grandfather, your great grandfather: the times all always a-changin.' Dylan sticks his feet in a bucket of commie-loving cement, and his politics sound dated.
By 1964, two factors should be clear concerning Bob Dylan. One, he's a "thinking man's artist." And two, is his "holier than thou" attitude. Of all the times he throws stones at hypocrites, and bellyaches about injustice, he never once examine's himself. Tell me one song where Dylan turns his spit and venom inward. Bob Dylan often reminds me of a bible thumping television evangelist: condemning the sins of others while never accounting for his own.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Terrific songs, July 27 2000
By 
Michael Dyckman (West Orange, NJ USA) - See all my reviews
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Like much of Dylan's earlier albums, this one contains songs that are very political (the title track, and Only A Pawn In Their Game, which speaks with bite of racism), tragedies (The Lonesome Death of Hattie Carroll), and war (With God On Our Side). But like many of his albums, there is humor and some aspects of love songs (Boots of Spanish Leather). Always a voice to hear and songs always worth hearing.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Before Dylan Went Electric!, July 13 2000
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M. Scagnelli (Brandon, Florida) - See all my reviews
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Before Dylan went electric in 1965 with the incredible Bringing it All Back home, Dylan was acoustic folk rock. The Times They Are A-Changin' is one of these albums. It is better than Another Side of Bob Dylan, but not quite as good as Freewheelin'. It is an essential early Dylan album with great songs such as The title track, With God On Our Side, and The Lonesome Death of Hattie Carroll.
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5.0 out of 5 stars perfectly encapsulated moral intensity, June 19 2000
A gaunt and bony-faced Bob stares out austerely from the cover, trying to resemble a Walker Evans depression-era photograph, and doing a pretty good job at that. These are THE classic 'protesty songs of his protest years', and overwhelmingly powerful they are too, building up from the attention- grabbing title song to culminate in the engrossing human tragedy of Hattie Carroll, the black maid beaten to death by a drunken socialite. Dylan's own mixture of fear and commitment is a noticably intriguing counterpoint to the strong political rhetoric. His usual 'restless feet' imagery in 'One Too Many Mornings' neatly contrasts with crumbling social stability of 'North Country Blues'. Even in 'Oxford Town' his campaigning is cut short by the urge to get out of the heat. By the end, the 'Restless Farewell' to activism is starkly set against the personalising of oppression in the story of Carroll and the vile Zanzinger. Both these final songs are hypnotic - perfect examples of Dylan's subtle development of his old technique of hanging onto, and drawing out lines so that resolutions seem suspended in mid-air, and endings seem like blessed moments of release.
What is most impressive, is that these mid-60s protest-songs seem neither dated, nor 'politically correct' in any way. Instead they recreate the real and intense sense of injustice and fear of destruction that dominated the era.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Changed My Life, March 28 2000
By 
Randall K. Ventresca (Sarasota, Florida United States) - See all my reviews
This album actually helped shape who I am politically and socially. Before I heard this album I was very naive and apathetic of the world around me and the issues confronting mankind.
Bob gave me a good shake and lit a fire inside of me that burns to this day. "Boots of Spanish Leather" is the great love song of the album but the real impact comes with "The Lonesome Death of Hatti Carroll", "The Times They Are A' Changing", "Only a Pawn in Their Game", and "When the Ship Comes In". "Restless Farewell" is also fantastic(sort of Bob's "My Way"). THANKS BOB!!
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5.0 out of 5 stars your baby's eyes look crazy there, Feb. 24 2000
By 
bryan t brown (Ski Country, Colorado) - See all my reviews
Wow- buy this album. Dylan's songs go beyond music.They are works of art. Feel some of dylan's greatest poetry. Each song is a story into it's own.
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Times They Are A-Changin (Vinyl)
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