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5.0 out of 5 stars Transitional record with some great songs.
Here Dylan's starting to sound like himself and less like his greatest vocal influence Rambln' Jack Elliot.
Published on June 2 2004 by Larry Ayers

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3.0 out of 5 stars Dark Depressing Dylan
This album looks and feels like a John Steinbeck novel. I get somewhat depressed just looking at the cover, and the effect increases when actually listening to the album. Dylan writes some solid folk/protest tunes here. It's nowhere near Freewheelin' but it's enjoyabie, although it's my least favorite folky Dylan album. Get this if you already have Freewheelin' and...
Published on Jan. 3 2004 by Moocey


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4.0 out of 5 stars Bible Thumping Evangelist, Sept. 30 2000
By 
dev1 (Baltimore) - See all my reviews
This is Dylan's one and only 100% protest album: ten angry songs pointing the finger at the establishment and the ills of society. Several are immediately memorable including a nostalgic look at the past (One Too Many Mornings), a lonesome farewell to my love (Boots Of Spanish Leather), and the tragic death of Hattie Carroll (The Lonesome Death Of Hattie Carroll). The message of 'The Lonesome Death Of Hattie Carroll' is reinforced with a chorus that, each time repeated, becomes more powerful. The album has a weary sameness: same tempo, same key, same melody. Political protest doesn't stand well with the test of time, because "the times they are a-changin." A sign reading "The Times They Are A-Changin" looks quaint at a left-wing rally, but it is a dumb song. Ask you dad, your grandfather, your great grandfather: the times all always a-changin.' Dylan sticks his feet in a bucket of commie-loving cement, and his politics sound dated.
By 1964, two factors should be clear concerning Bob Dylan. One, he's a "thinking man's artist." And two, is his "holier than thou" attitude. Of all the times he throws stones at hypocrites, and bellyaches about injustice, he never once examine's himself. Tell me one song where Dylan turns his spit and venom inward. Bob Dylan often reminds me of a bible thumping television evangelist: condemning the sins of others while never accounting for his own.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Terrific songs, July 27 2000
By 
Michael Dyckman (West Orange, NJ USA) - See all my reviews
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Like much of Dylan's earlier albums, this one contains songs that are very political (the title track, and Only A Pawn In Their Game, which speaks with bite of racism), tragedies (The Lonesome Death of Hattie Carroll), and war (With God On Our Side). But like many of his albums, there is humor and some aspects of love songs (Boots of Spanish Leather). Always a voice to hear and songs always worth hearing.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Before Dylan Went Electric!, July 13 2000
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M. Scagnelli (Brandon, Florida) - See all my reviews
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Before Dylan went electric in 1965 with the incredible Bringing it All Back home, Dylan was acoustic folk rock. The Times They Are A-Changin' is one of these albums. It is better than Another Side of Bob Dylan, but not quite as good as Freewheelin'. It is an essential early Dylan album with great songs such as The title track, With God On Our Side, and The Lonesome Death of Hattie Carroll.
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5.0 out of 5 stars perfectly encapsulated moral intensity, June 19 2000
A gaunt and bony-faced Bob stares out austerely from the cover, trying to resemble a Walker Evans depression-era photograph, and doing a pretty good job at that. These are THE classic 'protesty songs of his protest years', and overwhelmingly powerful they are too, building up from the attention- grabbing title song to culminate in the engrossing human tragedy of Hattie Carroll, the black maid beaten to death by a drunken socialite. Dylan's own mixture of fear and commitment is a noticably intriguing counterpoint to the strong political rhetoric. His usual 'restless feet' imagery in 'One Too Many Mornings' neatly contrasts with crumbling social stability of 'North Country Blues'. Even in 'Oxford Town' his campaigning is cut short by the urge to get out of the heat. By the end, the 'Restless Farewell' to activism is starkly set against the personalising of oppression in the story of Carroll and the vile Zanzinger. Both these final songs are hypnotic - perfect examples of Dylan's subtle development of his old technique of hanging onto, and drawing out lines so that resolutions seem suspended in mid-air, and endings seem like blessed moments of release.
What is most impressive, is that these mid-60s protest-songs seem neither dated, nor 'politically correct' in any way. Instead they recreate the real and intense sense of injustice and fear of destruction that dominated the era.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Changed My Life, March 28 2000
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Randall K. Ventresca (Sarasota, Florida United States) - See all my reviews
This album actually helped shape who I am politically and socially. Before I heard this album I was very naive and apathetic of the world around me and the issues confronting mankind.
Bob gave me a good shake and lit a fire inside of me that burns to this day. "Boots of Spanish Leather" is the great love song of the album but the real impact comes with "The Lonesome Death of Hatti Carroll", "The Times They Are A' Changing", "Only a Pawn in Their Game", and "When the Ship Comes In". "Restless Farewell" is also fantastic(sort of Bob's "My Way"). THANKS BOB!!
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5.0 out of 5 stars your baby's eyes look crazy there, Feb. 25 2000
By 
bryan t brown (Ski Country, Colorado) - See all my reviews
Wow- buy this album. Dylan's songs go beyond music.They are works of art. Feel some of dylan's greatest poetry. Each song is a story into it's own.
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4.0 out of 5 stars One of the Classics, Feb. 13 2000
By 
John Halloran "JP" (Cambridge, Massachusetts) - See all my reviews
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This album is a good listen from beginning to end. From the title song, right through to then end, this is an accessible album that shows an open and honest Dylan. Part protest, part sarcasm, and all emotional, the songs within speak the true Bob that many don't know. I won't even single out any particular songs, as I feel the whole album must be taken in it's context. One last note on this piece of work. In listening to "Restless Farewell', the closing song, I am reminded of an Irish traditional song entitled, "The Parting Glass'. If listened to closely, the similarities both in lyrics and music can be spotted. Honest folk fans won't be disappointed.
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5.0 out of 5 stars very good and available at amazon.com, Jan. 21 2000
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This album has good lyrics and an honest voice from which the lyrics come from. the tunes are all good. this album is arguably the best Dylan.
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5.0 out of 5 stars essential Bob Dylan, Nov. 11 1999
By 
Joseph Rouse (Fort Collins, CO USA) - See all my reviews
Bob Dylans The Times They Are A-Changing is what I would call a stepping stone into the full body of his work. Through this album, people unfimilair with Dylans music will get an idea of how politically important he is. In the song "WITH GOD ON OUR SIDE" Dylan examines the irony surrounding the strong belief in God most Americans have and the war-monger mantality this country embodys. "ONLY A PAWN IN THEIR GAME" illuminates the problems surrounding political power and race. "the south politician preeches to the poor white man.. You got more than the blacks ,dont complain.....you're better than them, you've been born with white skin, he explanes... and the negros name is used at his pain, for the politicians gain, as he rises to fame, and the poor white remains on the caboose of the trains, but it aint him to blame, he's only a pawn in their game".........."the poor white man is used in the hands of them all like a tool, he's taught in his schools,from the start by the rules, that the laws are with him, to protect his white skin, to keep up his hate so he never thinks straight, bout the shape that he's in, but it aint him to blame, he's only a pawn in thier game" Knowing that this album was put out in 65' shows just how foward thinking Dylan is. Buy this albus and digest every word, You'll be a better person for it. other great Dylan albums: Desire, Blood on the Tracks, Another side of Bob Dylan, and Bring it all back home.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Dylan in ultra-protest mode, Oct. 19 1999
By A Customer
When many people think of Bob Dylan, they think of a protest singer. In reality, that is only a very small part of the whole picture. This is the album where Bob Dylan was in protest mode. Nowhere did he ever sound as indignant and world-weary as he did here. The title track is one of Dylan's best known songs, but there are other gems here as well. "Ballad Of Hollis Brown" is a slow dirge-like song about an impoverished farmer who spends his last buck on shotgun shells so he can kill his whole family and then himself. It's very moving. "With God On Our Side" features Dylan at his most cynical and weary. "Boots of Spanish Leather" (basically a rewrite of "Girl From The North Country") is one of the most touching ballads on the album. Dylan tackles contemporary issues in songs like "Only A Pawn In Their Game" about racism in the South and the murder of Medgar Evers. This album is not easy listening though. The pace is rather slow. The last song, "Restless Farewell", moves along at an unbearable pace. I personally can't stand it. However, this album is worth picking up. After the release of this album, Dylan was afraid of being labeled a spokesman of his generation. As a result, his music became more personal and idiosyncratic after this release, but it became better too.
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Times They Are A-Changin (Vinyl)
Times They Are A-Changin (Vinyl) by Bob Dylan (LP Record - 2006)
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