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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars No Canadians Present?
The Longest Day was a great epic film, but it's hard to believe that no Canadians of influence in Hollywood at the time could have leveraged a small part of the film to depict Canada's contribution on D-Day. Someone should take the film now and insert a Canadian segment using CGI or whatever they did a few years ago to creat those commercials with John Wayne or Bogart in...
Published on June 8 2008 by Cap

versus
21 of 21 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Canada's Participation Almost Completely Ignored
Yes, this is one of the finest war movies ever made. However, I have to shake my head at those who talk of the film's accuracy when the Canadian participation is almost completely ignored. Virtually no mention is made of Juno beach. The film certainly doesn't mention that Juno was the second bloodiest Normandy beach, behind only Omaha. In spite of that, the Canadians...
Published on July 23 2003 by Allan W. Goodall


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5.0 out of 5 stars "Run me up the hill son", Aug. 4 2000
By 
Warren V Thoms (Wulkuraka, Queensland Australia) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Longest Day, the (VHS Tape)
Not only is this the greatest War Film ever made, it would also go close to being one of the best in any given category. You can simply forget any rumors that you've heard about this film being too 'Gung Ho', that is far from the truth as the documented accounts of the Normandy campaign, (Stephen E. Ambrose's are the best) will make you realize that D-DAY was crammed full of heroic feats not only created by fighting men but also by its leaders. 'The Longest Day' recreates many historical events and characters including Rommel, Von Rundsted and Eisenhower (and what a great resemblance too). The opening hour of the film allows the viewer to relive those crucial hours leading up to "the largest armada the world has ever seen" and possibly the greatest day in our modern history. The results will keep you glued to your seat as you will at times feel like a fly on the wall. The middle stages of the movie detail the strategies which then lead to the great battle scenes, which are neither gory nor totally accurate but are still able to successfully captivate the essence of war fare during the silver screen era. Perhaps Zanuck's greatest achievement in 'The Longest Day' was the way in which he wound down the film as the full irony and conclusions of D-DAY became apparent. "He's dead, I'm injured and your lost...I suppose it's always like that...war I mean" how could you put it better? The acting is second too none boasting an international cast, with John Wayne, Robert Mitchum and Henry Fonda in starring roles and that's just to name a few. Surprisingly enough, at no time does any actor dominate the screenplay or take away the performance of any colleague. That in it self was a masterful effort. Told from both the Allied and German perspectives, 'The longest Day' is based on the book by Cornelius Ryan and quite obviously gave director Steven Spielberg a window in which to create his own film 'Saving Private Ryan' (although these movies have very little in common). I could not urge you enough to buy a copy of this great film, I only wish I could see it on the big screen with the added bonus of dolby pro-logic digical sound. The dvd will be my next purchase.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Stop comparing to "Saving Private Ryan", May 28 2000
By A Customer
Comparing this film to "Saving Private Ryan" is ridiculous. It's like comparing "Gone With the Wind" to "Glory." Just because they both cover the same time period, they tell very different stories. "The Longest Day" lets you see the events leading up to this momentous day from all perspectives. You see the Nazi blunders, the arrogance of the German soldiers afraid to awaken Hitler, and so on. You see the French resistance at work and the role they played in setting up the stage. One of the best parts about watching this film is when you watch the closing credits roll and realize how many top-notch stars from each of the countries involved you missed. The only beef I have with this film is the hair styles of every single character are more representative of the early 1960s than 1944. If you can put that aside, watching this film is almost like you were a fly on the wall on those key hours of June 5 and 6, 1944. So you don't see someone's brains being blown out...so what? The standards of the early 1960s were different than they were today. Had they made it today there would have been as many "realistic" or "gory" scenes as "Saving Private Ryan." Still the film was realistic enough for actual D-Day vets to leave the theaters in tears when it was first released. Enjoy this film on its own merits and you'll be glad you did.
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5.0 out of 5 stars The best ever, May 18 2000
By A Customer
This review is from: Longest Day, the (VHS Tape)
I've seen this movie so many times I lost count, but it still captivates me. You can smell the fear, the tension, relief, all the emotions are there. It's the best movie of it's kind, no movie ever surpassed it and never will.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Best Depiction of How a Battle Is Really Planned and Fought, March 25 2000
By 
Erik Svane (Paris, France) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Longest Day, the (VHS Tape)
Based on Stephen Ambrose's "D-Day" masterpiece,Steven Spielberg's "Saving Private Ryan" - especially thefirst 25 minutes - will give you a better idea of what combat is really like... but "The Longest Day", based on another masterpiece (the book of the same name by Cornelius Ryan), illustrates better than any Hollywood picture how war is an organizational effort, won - or lost - not by a handful of superheroes but by a combination of armies, units, and individuals, along with healthy doses of planning, determination, and luck.
P.S. A note to the person complaining that none of the main Allied characters getting killed in the movie: Since the film recreates the real-life experiences of soldiers on June 6, 1944 - as told in hundreds of interviews after the war to journalist-author Cornelius Ryan - it stands to reason that every single one of the interviewees obviously - obviously! - survived Operation Overlord (and, indeed, the war). And if one observes closely, none of the characters played by the major German actors is actually killed either, and that for the same obvious reason.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Not Saving Private Ryan - but it wasn't supposed to be, Aug. 9 1999
By A Customer
This review is from: Longest Day, the (VHS Tape)
This is not Saving Private Ryan. And those who compare it to that movie are comparing apples to oranges. This movie tells the story of the Normandy invasion - not the human side of war - and was made 35 years before SPR. It was purposely filmed in b&w to give the movie a documentary style. TLD is truly a classic and accurately portrays the great scale, importance, and desperation of the entire invasion from both sides. If you want to better understand D-Day or SPR then you should see this movie. If you just want to see people get blown away then see an Arnie flik.
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3.0 out of 5 stars Lotsa stars do not rate five!!!, July 21 1999
By A Customer
World War II as a football game (C'mon boys, let's go!). Sure, it's loaded with big names, but most of them just make hammy cameos, if not truly abhorrent performances (John Wayne, Sean Connery, Richard Beymer and the guy who keeps hearing "Hold until relieved!"). The French act better, but they get to wear those silly berets. No one dies bloody and many deliver long corny speeches that after a while you start rooting for the Germans! Made in 1963, it's "look-son-look-what- daddy-did-in- the-war!" kind of movie that, personally, I don't buy. Neither should you.
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5.0 out of 5 stars A D-Day compendium,using true vignettes rather than fiction., June 23 1999
By 
pcigane@ibm.net (San Mateo, California) - See all my reviews
I first saw TLD in Paris, when it was released in Europe in 1963. Although the movie was made less than 20 years after the events it depicted took place, for many people in the audience this was the first visual depiction of this specific day. Until then, an oral history of the "debarquement" was what most French men and women had been exposed to, and, like most other members of the audience, I will never forget the German bunker scene when the early morning fog finally lifts to reveal the allied invasion force. It seemed like the entire movie theater had held its collective breath only to release it when the naval guns came alive. The power of the movie, for me, resided in its myriad of small, true vignettes which eventually help paint the larger picture and its ability to seamlessly switch between sides and ranks; from the agonizing hours before the final green light was given, betting the invasion on the accuracy of the weather forecast to the doomed and useless strafing sortie of the two German fighter planes. In conclusion, by today's standards, the acting might have been sometimes crude, the special effects not realistic enough, but the tone was never jingoistic or overly simplistic. The movie managed to convey quite effectively the message that D-Day's ultimate success was due to a combination of blind luck, careful planning, tangled execution and countless individual acts of valor and selflessness. That afternoon, in a dark Champs Elysees movie theater, all of it came to life; and for that I am grateful to Mr. Zanuck and company...
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5.0 out of 5 stars One of the best to date., June 3 1999
By A Customer
This movie has it all, the stars, action and tells the story of one of the most important days in our history. A must for any fan of war movies. The wide screen is just a favorite of mine. Not as graphic as Saving Private Ryan but is a real deep story. Although no movie or book can do justice to the job done by our fearless troops on June 6, 1944. Our vets of that era are getting on in years and our thanks can never be enough compared to the price they paid. When these men were young they saved the world. The Longest Day takes you there, in the trenches.
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3.0 out of 5 stars longest day, May 24 1999
By A Customer
writing this again as i forgot 2 put name of movie....well not 2 happy with this movie as u only seen paul about 2-3 x and for about 4 seconds, he should have had a bigger part in the movie
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3.0 out of 5 stars movie ok, May 24 1999
By A Customer
i was not 2 happy with is movie because u only seen paul about 2 or 3 times, and only for about 4 seconds, he should have had a bigger part and be shown more
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