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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars No band sounded like that in those days... simply superb!
Sin After Sin is often received with mixed emotions. Firstly, it isn't a commercial music product at all, which makes it fascinating. A masterpiece to be slowly digested. This album is one of Priest's most intriguing, yet brilliant productions. It touches many musical ranges... it is heavy (ie. the Sinner), brutally heavy (Dissident Aggressor), furious (Call for the...
Published on Nov. 9 2003 by electricphase

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3.0 out of 5 stars Judas Priest + Deep Purple = "Sin After Sin"
Considered Judas Priest's first "real" record and debut on a major record label with a major producer (Deep Purple bassist, Roger Glover), 'Sin After Sin' is not one of the best of the records, sonically speaking. In fact, the production quality of their debut efforts, 'Rocka Rolla' (1974) and 'Sad Wings of Destiny' (1976), is arguably superior (for example, compare...
Published on Nov. 9 2001 by S B


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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars �Good intentions pave the way to hell�, Feb. 18 2004
This review is from: Sin After Sin (Audio CD)
This album is showing former Deep Purple and future Rainbow bassist Roger Glover as producer - but the way he could have pushed f.e. Nazareth four years earlier didn't succeed alike with Judas Priest. I mean this case he pushed forward the Deep Purple-scheme of complexity, long solos etc. but with songs of which neither the riffs nor the vocal melodies were catchy enough to keep the excitement along. (Oh if he has pursued this receipt on the later Rainbow albums!)
So all in all I have to say this album - of which title is taken from the classic song 'Genocide' - as some tracks on it are a bit too long. (And I don't mean the long and monotonous but very atmospheric ballad 'Here Come The Tears'.)
It praises the ingenuity of these musicians how they covered Joan Baez's acoustic song 'Diamonds And Rust' that became one of their finest hard and at the same time catchingly melodious tunes. But when you listen to 'Unleashed In The East' it becomes obvious how some tracks from this album could hit with a better sound. Another summit of the record is the short and extremely aggressive closing track 'Dissident Aggressor' - no wonder that it was covered by Slayer on 'South Of Heaven'.
In short this record is not bad, by far not the worst, but if preceding 'Sad Wings Of Destiny' is a thunder, it is just a plopping rain.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars No band sounded like that in those days... simply superb!, Nov. 9 2003
By 
This review is from: Sin After Sin (Audio CD)
Sin After Sin is often received with mixed emotions. Firstly, it isn't a commercial music product at all, which makes it fascinating. A masterpiece to be slowly digested. This album is one of Priest's most intriguing, yet brilliant productions. It touches many musical ranges... it is heavy (ie. the Sinner), brutally heavy (Dissident Aggressor), furious (Call for the Priest), soft and moody (Last Rose of Summer), atmospheric (Raw Deal) and soulful (Here Come the Tears), et all.
Rob Halford's vocals and lyrics are at their peak here. Glenn and KK's guitars are imaginative, skillful and impressive. Ian Hill's bass is... hmmm, let's better skip that with Simon Phillip's (then still an teenager!!!) incredible drumming. Until this day I still can't believe some of the prodigious and intricate drums parts he laid down for those sessions (unfortunately, he only acted as a session player). Simon started a whole thrashy drum movement with his dexterity in Sin After Sin.
Roger Glover's production here is frequently critized for not achieving a heavier sound, but I disagree with that, as the end result is just what was needed musically.
The real beauty of Sin After Sin is that one can actually listen to many new subtle things each time one listens to it, no matter how many times played back... and that simply doesn't happen often these days. IT HAS MAGIC ALL OVER IT. This is a must item in any rock CD collection. A timeless classic and my favorite Priest album!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Sin after sin, priest's 2nd classic album, Jan. 14 2003
This review is from: Sin After Sin (Audio CD)
After releasing their 2nd minor label album "Sad wings of destiny" in 1976, which I consider being Judas Priest's first classic and most crucial to what's going to be heard in metal for the following years, the band released in 1977 "Sin after Sin". Though I find it not as good as the previous one, excellent pieces of metal can be heard on this album.
This album was the only one to feature the session drummer Simon Phillips, replacing Alan Moore, who had apparently no idea of how great the band was going to be. Simon Phillips will later join the group Toto : you can hear his drums on the albums "Tambu" and "Mindfields".
My personnal ratings are :
Sinner - A
A classic rock song. It's good but quite fast boring at the end.
The chorus is average.
Diamonds and Rust - A
Another classic, but the chorus is just average and a little annoying.
Starbreaker - A+
This is my favorite song on the CD. Rob Halford sings all lyrics. This song has an excellent rhythm.
Last rose of summer - C- : I was looking for a good Judas Priest ballad, but this one is pretty asleeping
Let us prey... - C+
D+ for the beginning of the song which is a plain Queen imitation (not that I don't like Queen but this is annoying),
A+ for the guitar solo which is excellent.
Raw deal - A+
This one is pure enjoyment, melodic guitar, slow rhythm, best Halford's vocals.
Here come the tears - B-
This is another quite boring ballad, but better than the 'Last rose of summer'.
Dissident aggressor - D+
This song is awful, it's noisy, messy, not the Priest I like ! Though, many like it and it was included on 'Metal Works' compilation.
I should put 4 stars since I don't think this is Judas Priest's best album, but I find it excellent, and I think I still deserves 5 because this is quite inventive for heavy metal in the 70's. Though, Deep Purple and Black Sabbath had already started the movement. By the way, Deep Purple's bassist Roger Glover participated in the production of this album.
Line-up :
Glenn Tipton - Guitars
Robert Halford - Vocals
K.K. Downing - Guitars
Ian Hill - Bass
Simon Phillips - Drums.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Worthwhile Trip, March 9 2004
By 
David Higgins (Greenville, FL United States) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Sin After Sin (Audio CD)
The only worthwhile moment in three years of visiting my parents in South Carolina while I was in college was that one afternoon I picked up a radio station playng "Sinner". It was a new album at the time and I would have probably never heard it if not for that afternoon. It would be difficult to pick a high point on this CD, with Sinner, Diamonds and Rust and Call for the Priest, it doesn't let up. Great find, great buy, great disc.
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5.0 out of 5 stars A highly underrated tour de force!, April 23 2003
By 
This review is from: Sin After Sin (Audio CD)
I think Sin After Sin is the greatest Judas Priest album of all time. Other albums like Stained Class and Sad Wings of Destiny are also amazing, but it's just something about this album that makes it much better.
The record kicks off with the incredible "Sinner" with amazing vocals by Rob Halford and plenty of guitar solos. "Diamonds and Rust" (originally done by Joan Baez) is one of the greatest cover songs I've ever heard. "Starbreaker" is great, but could have been improved a little. The ballad "Last Rose of Summer" is magnificent and rather catchy. "Let Us Prey" is a fast-tempo song that totally rocks. "Call for the Priest/Raw Deal" is another hard rocking song with a powerful closing. "Here Come the Tears" is another ballad with amazing guitarwork. Finally, the incredible "Dissident Aggressor" will blow you away.
I am reviewing this album based on the original version (I have the old cassette) and I am very pleased with this record. Even if you are a casual Priest fan, you'll be doing yourself a favor by getting this album.
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5.0 out of 5 stars A highly underrated tour de force!, April 23 2003
By 
This review is from: Sin After Sin (Audio CD)
I think Sin After Sin is the greatest Judas Priest album of all time. Other albums like Stained Class and Sad Wings of Destiny are also amazing, but it's just something about this album that makes it much better.
The record kicks off with the incredible "Sinner" with amazing vocals by Rob Halford and plenty of guitar solos. "Diamonds and Rust" (originally done by Joan Baez) is one of the greatest cover songs I've ever heard. "Starbreaker" is great, but could have been improved a little. The ballad "Last Rose of Summer" is magnificent and rather catchy. "Let Us Prey" is a fast-tempo song that totally rocks. "Call for the Priest/Raw Deal" is another hard rocking song with a powerful closing. "Here Come the Tears" is another ballad with amazing guitarwork. Finally, the incredible "Dissident Aggressor" will blow you away.
I am reviewing this album based on the original version (I have the old cassette) and I am very pleased with this record. Even if you are a casual Priest fan, you'll be doing yourself a favor by getting this album.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Time For the real deal !!!, Aug. 29 2002
By 
Pitchulo Dun Dun (Filha de Uma Puta) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Sin After Sin (Audio CD)
Ok. After the unimpressive (but not bad) ROCKA ROLLA and the fantastic (but witha a lame production) SAD WINGS OF DESTINY, Priest had all their effort vindicated and secured a deal with a major company. It was time for the truth.
And truth proved to be that Priest was a band that had come to stay, one of those few bands that were going to influence dozens, hundreds or even thousands of rock bands around the world, as Iron Maiden, Black Sabbath, Deep Purple, Led Zeppelin, Rush, Cream, Metallica, Pink Floyd, Beatles and a handful of others managed to do.
Now with producer Roger Glover aboard and professional hired master drummer Simon Philips on the sticks, Priest was set to dominate thw world. SIN AFTER SIN shines from the word "go". IT has everything a metal record should have. It's fresh. It's raw. It's punchier. It's catchy. Of course production devices of the time did not help the bands so much, but the album survived that.
AFter this album, Les Binks came into the fold, to release the classic Stained Class and Hell Bent For leather (Killing Machine).
You just can't go wrong with SIN AFTER SIN. It does not sound dated. I think Glenn Tipton himself should listen to it once in a while to analyse what he is doing to Priest's music nowadays....
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4.0 out of 5 stars An excellent classic metal album, June 25 2002
This review is from: Sin After Sin (Audio CD)
[THIS REVIEW IS FOR THE REMASTER WITH BONUS TRACKS.]
Sin After Sin (1977.) Judas Priest's third studio album, and the first on a major record label.
In the mid-seventies, a little-known hard rock band from Great Britain known as Judas Priest emerged onto the rock scene. Their first album, Rocka Rolla, wasn't too successful in any part of the world, but it showed that these guys were a band with potential. The follow-up, Sad Wings Of Destiny, showed us what these guys were fully capable of. Following the release of Sad Wings Of Destiny, someone must have heard it and been very impressed, because the guys got a deal with a major record label. In 1977, they released their third studio album, Sin After Sin. And to make things even better, every Judas Priest album from Sin After Sin to Painkiller has recently been remastered and given two unreleased bonus tracks (usually an unreleased studio session and an unreleased live session.) Read on for my review of Sin After Sin.
Sinner - The opener is a prime example of straight-up classic metal, with a very slight but noticable melodic touch. In this track, Halford's vocals are simply killer.
Diamonds And Rust - This one is a cover of an old Joen Baez song (she was a fairly famous recording artist from the hippie era.) This song is a little weird because it's so much different from what you're used to hearing from Judas Priest, but it's still a good one.
Starbreaker - Here we've got classic British hard rock at its very best. Halford's vocals, as usual, are excellent. One of the guitar riffs in this song was later used in their biggest hit, You've Got Another Thing Coming.
Last Rose Of Summer - If the title of this track didn't give it away, this one slows things down a bit. Basically, what you get here is a slow, melodic ballad. It's a good track - surprising since Priest is recognized for being a classic METAL band.
Let Us Prey/Call For The Priest - This one kicks off with some excellent guitar riffs and "chanted" vocals, giving the first few moments a "holy" sound. Before long, it becomes a classic NWOBHM assault on your senses that you won't soon forget. Great song.
Raw Deal - With this track, the band does what just about every British hard rock band of the day was trying to do. This one's got some good vocals, but ultimately, it's probably the weakest track here - it's not a bad one, though.
Here Come The Tears - This is a very interesting track due to style fusion. Though it starts out as a slow and melodic ballad using a piano and acoustic guitars, it quickly adds electric guitar riffs into the mixture. Surprisingly, the style fusion works well.
Dissident Aggressor - The closing track (to the original version of the album) is the fastest one on the album, and it's no less heavy than the previous ones. Once again, Halford's vocals steal the show.
BONUS TRACKS:
Race With The Devil - This is an excellent example of early British hard rock/heavy metal. It sounds like what a number of bands were trying to do in the early seventies, just after the discovery of heavy metal. Although this track steals the riff from UFO's Doctor Doctor, it's still an excellent one, and I'm glad to see it finally get an official release.
Jawbreaker (live) - The closer is a live version of a track that wouldn't actually make it to a studio album until 1984. This live version is less polished and of lower sound quality than its finished brother, but it's still a good track overall.
If you're a fan of classic hard rock/heavy metal, Sin After Sin is a highly recommended album. THIS is what heavy metal is supposed to sound like, unlike the garbage that has been flooding the airwaves in recent years. Just make sure you buy the remastered edition, or you'll miss out on the bonus tracks!
SIDE NOTE: An interesting note to anyone who cares - I recently received word that Rob Halford has rejoined Judas Priest, and they will be touring and releasing a new studio album (Halford's replacement singer in Judas Priest, Tim "Ripper" Owers, left to become the new singer of Iced Earth.) And when that new album hits stores, you can rest assured I will be reviewing it.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Sinister Priest Remastered, April 9 2002
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This review is from: Sin After Sin (Audio CD)
WOW! Let me first start off by saying that each Judas Priest studio effort is a distinguishable classic. The Judas Priest Remaster series is both good and bad. Good because each studio release sounds sonically superior to the old versions. All of them sound clean, crisp sounding from Sin After Sin through Painkiller. Also good on some of the reissues are the studio bonus tracks. I will review each bonus track as I review each reissue, some are better than others. The bad part about the studio ablum remasters series is the live bonus tracks (do not be confused, the live bonus tracks on both live reissues are great, and I include those bonus tracks in the reviews). ALL the live bonus tracks are lousy. The sound quality is good, just the performances are uninspried, and lame. From Sin After Sin's Jawbreaker (Halford sounds weak here) to Painkiller's Leather Rebel (which is made worse because it's rpobably the weakest song on Painkiller). If you are a fan who has all the studio albums already and are looking to wet your ears with the live tracks, forget about it, they will let you down. Seriously, the songs off of the Halford-less 98 Live Meltdown are more inspirational than these live bonus songs. Well that sums up the Remaster Series as a whole,
now on with the individual review...
Sin After Sin is Judas Priest's debut in a sense. And in alot of ways. The major one being for a major label, CBS. The other being produced by (at the time) former-DP bassist Roger Glover.
This album pretty much sounds like no other in the Priest cannon.
It's metal, rock, contemporary, etc. THeir are beautiful ballads like Diamonds and Rust, Last Rose of Summer, and Here Come the Tears. Their is Rock like on Starbreaker, Call of the Priest.
And finally is their METAL. Sinner is just balls out METAL! Great song to open the album, but it is Dissident Aggressor that closes the album that is pure METAL HEAVEN!!! Halford is at his vicious best on the vocals. If this song does not make you head bang, then my friend, you are not METAL. As for the studio bonus track, Race With The Devil is a raw sounding, straight ahead rocker. Good
bonus track. To me, SAS is their best 70's album, and probably their best overall in their career. Sinfully delicious!
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5.0 out of 5 stars Priest's Major Label Debut, Nov. 27 2001
This review is from: Sin After Sin (Audio CD)
This was the metal gods third studio album and it came out in 1977. It was also their first ever on a major label, as their first two were put out by the indie label Gull Records. CBS records in the USA was the label to originally release this album and it helped finally give them some world wide recognition. It also helped they had Deep Purple bassist Roger Glover to produce their album, as the band were very unhappy with the production job their first two albums had, even though proud of the songs on them. They finally get the production they deserve with help and advice from Glover.
The album kicks off with the powerful "Sinner" and was a concert highlight for many tours. The sinister main riff is classic with its dark imagery of the apocalypse, and the middle section is great with K.K. Downing doing a powerful solo. "Diamonds And Rust" is a great cover of the Joan Baez classic and is ok here but the live version on "Unleashed In The East" just blows it away, as most fans will agree with that. "Starbreaker" is another riff driven metal classic and the first half ends with the ballad "Last Rose Of Summer" which is about a guy giving his woman the last rose of summer in late August so during fall and winter its a symbol their love will go on. Who says metal bands can't write a heart felt ballad?? The speed picks up again with "Let Us Prey/Call For The Priest" and I bet Roger Glover really had input a lot on this song as it has a Deep Purple vibe throughout it, especially the solos in the middle part. This is my second favorite of the album, and I wonder if it was ever done live?? I know certainly never after this tour it wasn't, which is a shame as it would be amazing in the live setting with all its dynamics. "Raw Deal" is one that really benefits from the remastering as it never really jumped out at me before, but its dynamics too are really felt in this remaster. Its a good, slow but heavier than thou tune. "Here Come The Tears" is the second ballad of the album, but differs greatly from "Last Rose Of Summer" as that was optimistic, but this one is very dark and you can feel the sorrow of potentially losing a loved one, someone that was the world to you, and feeling so alone. It gets very powerful towards the end and climaxes with some radar sounding feedback in the distance which leads into the album closer and my favorite, "Dissident Aggressor"!!! With its twisted, ultra heavy main riff, and all out agression, it hints at the direction Priest would take on heavily on their next albums. Lyrically its about a brainwashed soldier under constant scrutiny yet happily going along with whatever orders are thrown at him, as his hate for the enemy is so strong he will do anything to topple them!! The bonus tracks are cool too, "Reace With The Devil" was just used as a studio jam but has some great dualing lead work and powerful vocals and the live version of "Jawbreaker" is great as well. This one is an essential piece of metal history.
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Sin After Sin
Sin After Sin by Judas Priest (Audio CD - 2001)
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