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4.1 out of 5 stars109
4.1 out of 5 stars
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Showing 1-10 of 15 reviews(3 star). Show all reviews
on April 14, 2004
This is a great silent film, but don't expect this "restored" version to live up to Kino's edition of "Metropolis." There is quite a lot of scratches & trash, especially toward the beginning, and I wonder exactly what qualifies it as "restored," as there is no accompanying before/after feature. It's really enjoyable if you select the soundtrack by Art Zoyd.
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on October 10, 2003
The horror of F.W. Murnau's "Nosferatu" springs from its atmosphere. This was a film made before excessive gore and audience manipulation tricks were employed to produce cheap thrills that passed for fright. This is a vampire flick made before the vampire itself became a cliché. So pure is this vision of darkness that its sense of dread continues to be palpable with each new viewing.
A real estate agent in Germany named Knock (Alexander Granach) tells his employee Hutter (Gustav von Wangenheim) to pay a visit to the reclusive Count Orlok (Max Schreck), who has expressed an interest in purchasing a new house. Hutter travels to the Carpathian Mountains and encounters nervous villagers and oddly behaving animals before finally meeting the Count. It does not take long for Hutter to realize he is in danger and soon he finds himself racing Orlok back home to ensure the safety of his beloved Ellen (Greta Schröder).
The imagery of "Nosferatu" still retains its ability to haunt one's dreams. Seeing the Count's fast-motion carriage, the ghost ship making its way into the harbor, and the emergence of the Count from his coffin can still send chills up one's spine. Schreck's performance is the total antithesis of Bela Lugosi's famous incarnation of Dracula. There is no glamour to his vampire and there is no charm in his mannerisms. Orlok's persona exudes evil and his features manifest the terrible notions of decay, disease, and death. His character is truly at home in a film that feels so much like a dreadful nightmare.
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on February 25, 2003
Instead of 5 stars i give 3 to this edition, and here's why:
I am a fan of the original stuffs, in this case, i bought this edition thinking about the entire classic movie, with a new and improved transfer and without modifications, you know what i mean, just THE apropiated subtitles, additional opcional bg music and the DVD original special features.
I have to tell you that this is transfer of a 'colored version' of the movie. Sometime long ago, someone gave color to the movie: instead of the original black & white, there's black & red when the scene happens during the afternoon, black & yellow in the morning, black & blue in the night...etc.
Another thing, for example: when a caracter reads a letter , this edition replaced the original close ups of the letter and it's contents for a computer generated draw of the letter and its's content, as you can imagine, with funny word fonts in english. This makes a great contrast between the really old movie and the clear old-simulated texts. I think this is a lack of good taste.
If you don't care about this little details, just buy it, it's a good and improved editon. A really new way to see and apreciate this classic.
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on August 1, 2002
This film is interesting but well within the limits of the 1922 cinema from which it sprang. Hardcore fans of the genre all know the story about how the filmmaker "borrowed" Brahm Stoker's story of Dracula, embellished it in some ways and released this film without the proper permissions. The Count is portrayed as a grotesque creature in this version, bringing with him infestations of rats. There is a twist at the end where this creature shows humanity and self sacrifice which is quite a departure from Stoker's original novel where the Count is hunted down and destroyed in order to save the heroine from becoming a vampire. All this makes the film interesting but it is a silent movie and therefore may not appeal to most people who just want to pop a movie in the machine on Friday night. It's nonetheless very much a film for fans that are interested in the evolution of the vampire in cinema. The film has been called quite extraordinary for its time. I would still only recommend it to the curious or silent movie fans.
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on April 8, 2002
The movie is quite frigthening in some scenes, and it shows the great talent of murnau and max shreck himself, i bought this dvd recently and i enjoyed it, because everytime i play the movie it i find something new, and gives that eerie feeling of the movie not being actually a movie but something else.
The image is ok, for a 1920's film i cant ask for something better, the audio department mostly ... sadly, the new audio essay performed by the silent orchestra has to much rythim for the movie and makes it a bothersome most of the times its like hearing to a fairy tale story, i was dissapointed with the new audio essay because it appears that its going sound really great(mainly on the main menu) but i expected a really creepy music to accent the movie but i found most of the time a dumb cheesy interpretation, it has also the original organ soundtrack, but it sounds different from the one that i recalled, besides it sounds repetitive and sometimes boring.
The add ons where great though, it has a good audio commentary, and several images and comments about the making of the film and the locations where it was filmed.
this is one of my favorite movies and the dvd has many good features but its preffer to watch it mute and playing a good instrumental cd orchestration like bach.
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on April 8, 2002
The movie is quite frigthening in some scenes, and it shows the great talent of murnau and max shreck himself, i bought this dvd recently and i enjoyed it, because everytime i play the movie it i find something new, and gives that eerie feeling of the movie not being actually a movie but something else.
The image is ok, for a 1920's film i cant ask for something better, the audio department mostly... sadly, the new audio essay performed by the silent orchestra has to much rythim for the movie and makes it a bothersome most of the times its like hearing to a fairy tale story, i was dissapointed with the new audio essay because it appears that its going sound really great(mainly on the main menu) but i expected a really creepy music to accent the movie but i found most of the time a dumb cheesy interpretation, it has also the original organ soundtrack, but it sounds different from the one that i recalled, besides it sounds repetitive and sometimes boring.
The add ons where great though, it has a good audio commentary, and several images and comments about the making of the film and the locations where it was filmed.
this is one of my favorite movies and the dvd has many good features but its preffer to watch it mute and playing a good instrumental cd orchestration like bach.
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on March 16, 2002
An unsettling masterpiece that seemingly is without origin. It says 1922, but it could easily be 1522. There is an incredible attention to cinematic narrative and detail - all with static shots -- and the screen's creepiest Dracula. Sadly, I agree with the others. The organ score is bland and detracts from the horror, while words like "doofus" and "cheesy" are apt words for the modern soundtrack (the best way to imagine how it'll sound in 20 years is to think of what a "modern" soundtrack from the 70s would sound like now). Years ago, there was a VHS version that had the perfect soundtrack, which was seemingly composed with an organ that came from the same murky past as the movie itself. The movie isn't the same without it.
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on March 23, 2001
This could have been a beautiful, artistic, provocative movie recommended to anyone who loves the cinema. Instead, it is an artistic failure! The "avantgarde" score (imagine bongos, bells and synethesizers!) provided by The Silent Orchestra (should have stayed that way!) is distracting, cacophonous, and woefully out-of-sync with the visuals. For the best results, turn off the sound until the more traditional organ score returns. Better yet, purchase the DVD version of The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari to see a bona fide artistic masterpiece, that masterfully integrates the audio with the visual!
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on January 26, 2002
The other descriptions provide very good explanations of the advantages of this DVD. The one big flaw is that the included musical scores ruined the suspense of the film. The newer symphony recording seemed goofy, the organ score was more acceptable but for some reason soothed the creepiest scenes.
There was a version I saw on VHS several years ago (probably expurgated more than this one) that had a sparse and unsettling soundtrack that fit the movie perfectly. It wasn't well recorded, but that only made it fit all the better. Wish I knew which version that was...
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on February 26, 2004
I'm going to keepit short its a good film avery bad dvd I watched for an hour and was very jumpy and when I looked to see if there were any sratches or finger prints there were'nt
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