Customer Reviews


136 Reviews
5 star:
 (101)
4 star:
 (15)
3 star:
 (8)
2 star:
 (7)
1 star:
 (5)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favourable review
The most helpful critical review


3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Classic Album
To me, a classic album is one in which I can return to time and again and rediscover the joy and excitement I found in it the first time I played it. This is true with Television's 1977 masterpiece MARQUEE MOON. In addition, the bonus material adds over 30 minutes of music to the original release. The most significant being the inclusion of their 1975 independently...
Published on Dec 30 2003 by Steve Vrana

versus
3.0 out of 5 stars Bunnymen did it better...
I've been hearing about this album for ages and have purchased it 3 times over the last 15 years, each time with the thought that I must be missing something as it's always so highly praised by everyone. With the reissue I figured it will sound glorious and maybe I'll finally get it.... well I still don't, the songs are still mediocre and really the guitar interplay is...
Published on Nov. 29 2003 by kosmonot


‹ Previous | 1 214 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Classic Album, Dec 30 2003
By 
Steve Vrana (Aurora, NE) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Marquee Moon (Expanded) (Audio CD)
To me, a classic album is one in which I can return to time and again and rediscover the joy and excitement I found in it the first time I played it. This is true with Television's 1977 masterpiece MARQUEE MOON. In addition, the bonus material adds over 30 minutes of music to the original release. The most significant being the inclusion of their 1975 independently released single "Little Johhny Jewel," a 7-minute song originally spread out over two sides of the original 45, now spliced together as a single track. The other bonus tracks are alternate versions of "See No Evil," "Friction" and "Marquee Moon," along with an untitled instrumental. Like the Velvet Underground, Television never sold many records, but their influence is significant. ESSENTIAL
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Must-have for any music fan, not just punks..., Sept. 15 2006
By 
S. Luo (canada) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Marquee Moon (Expanded) (Audio CD)
Marquee Moon was rated the #2 most oustanding/influential debuts by Q magazine and definitely deserves the title.
Television's music has the excitement and energy of the punk generation, but unlike most of their contempoaries (other regulars at CBGB's such as the Ramones and the New York Dolls), this band has technique and talent (gasp, yes).
Tom Verlaine is truly gifted in both songwriting and guitar playing. His lyrics are like triple entendres and thought-rovoking. Every note of his intricate guitar solos add to the song, never ostentatious.
The other members are no less adept in their respective instruments; Richard Lloyd is as much responsible as Verlaine for the record's beautiful entwining guitar passages. Fred Smith and Billy Ficca make up the rythm section, both very solid and fluid musicians.
Marquee Moon was worth every penny of the [...] i spent and more. Tom Verlaine's strange voice and the lengthy guitar solos may not be to everyone's taste, i agree, but personally i cannot imagine anyone not being blown away by the amazingness of this album. I listen to and love many bands, from the smiths to sonic youth to the beatles, but i have never been as captured by a sigle album as this one.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A candle was flickering, and I was finally listening..., May 8 2004
This review is from: Marquee Moon (Expanded) (Audio CD)
So what are you looking for in this review? An affirmation of this band's place in history? I'm sorry, I cannot offer that. For you see, this band will be forgotten. When the mists of history come sweeping down, Television will be forgotten, but the Clash and the Sex Pistols will be remembered. But, for those who were ever still, sitting in silence with headphones wrapping them up, protecting them when Tom Verlaine's second solo in Marquee Moon hit... well, you know. His fingers needling those aluminum strings might as well as been plucking your heartstrings. This I know. I have never heard a guitar express sorrow such as this. Such furious, raging, flamboyant sorrow. Tom's playing on this album is ghost-like, otherwordly. His fingers are aliens transplanted from a world drowned by feeling. Cities under oceans of emotion. Richard Lloyd, Fred Smith, Billy Ficca are not background players here. They create the fabric of the dream, Tom's guitar couldn't play in the clouds if these three men didn't send him there with a beautiful rocket up his ass. Need proof? Listen to Television, then listen to Tom's solo albums. The music on this album is something, if given time, precious time, will in Oscar William's words, immortally wound you. It will stay in the folds of your heart until you're old, and the opening chords to Friction still give your crippled ass a januty step. The feeling and conveyance of sweet dread in Elevation will stick to the bottom of your feet forever. Prove It's rambling nature being saved by an insane solo will stir in you a belief of redemption. Torn Curtain's dark emotional melodrama will send you seeking scenes of your life in the stars. Every track here tells a ragged story of glory. Like Joe once shrieked, love and glory all becomes another story, but the question, will you.... listen to this story? If the Ramones were a beautiful drunken girl with huge (...) reading Dr. Seuess in a lovely voice, then Television was a Doestievski lookalike high on opium reading in a jittery voice some ancient text whose words, though wonderous, are no longer understood.... And, that's all I have to say.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars I want to marry this album, Dec 11 2005
By 
Kathleen YO! (Montreal, Quebec Canada) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Marquee Moon (Expanded) (Audio CD)
I bought this album two weeks ago and I can't stop listening to it...whatever, its not punk, who cares? Even when I'm not listening to it I find the music and the lyrics stay embedded in my brain. I usually hate long drawn out solos but I love the 10 minute Marquee Moon and then the bonus track Little Johnny Jewel. I don't know if I'll ever be able to stop listening to this album.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars Marquee Moon, March 27 2004
By 
S. Imai (Seabeck, WA United States) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Marquee Moon (Expanded) (Audio CD)
This has got to be a holy grail record of guitar rock, punk, whatever you want to call it. Makes me wonder why Sgt. Pepper and Revolver are considered so incredibly essential when they are boring and as dull-as-hell when compared to the eccentricities,
god-like guitar parts, and other-worldy songs in Television's Marquee Moon... A Taxman? or A Marquee Moon? I'll take a Marquee Moon any day.
How does a band create such a masterpiece as a debut record? Capital-driven magazines such as New Musical Express won't be so quick to label no-so-masterful debut albums as "masterpieces" after hearing this record. Marquee Moon is a truly rare experience, and no wonder why an R.E.M singer once believed that Tom Verlaine and company were "God" - for the duration of this incredible and rare recording, they really sound like rock gods spilling out new possiblities of what rock music can be. Throw this record into outerspace, ladies and gents, cos it doesn't belong to the forces of gravity. Thank you Television!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars A staple of great, influential rock., Feb. 27 2004
By 
This review is from: Marquee Moon (Expanded) (Audio CD)
My thoughts when I first checked out Marquee Moon? The original version had eight songs. How could a record with eight songs be praised so highly?
Because all of them rock. And as an album, they mesh together remarkably.
Verlaine's vocals are what make, or break, the album for the listener. For many, they can take a bit of an adjustment in musical taste. But the thing is that they're powerful enough to make that happen. On Marquee Moon, he's not a screamer or a whiner. He's a strong, emotional vocalist. Songs like "Friction" and "Elevation" prove the point. He could be singing "Old MacDonald Had a Farm" and many would be glued.
Don't expect the Sex Pistols... the disregard for all authority isn't here. Don't expect The Ramones... Marquee Moon is a more complicated sort of fun. Don't expect The Clash... it's not as outright political. Don't expect the Velvet Underground... though that's getting closer. Television's style is simply their own, and the reason why they're considered "punk" is because they were part of the great New York musical scene of the 70s. Their music requires an attention span, a bit of patience, and an admiration for pure musicianship.
What are the highlights? Listen, and find out for yourself. You may be tempted to say "everything"... which is a good few tracks, even if it's the eight song version.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars See No Evil, Jan. 20 2004
By 
Unfortunately hampered by the limiting term, "punk," Television often gets lumped with the usual CBGB acts such as Blondie and the Ramones. This is far from a valid grouping, seeing as how Television has far more musical sensibility and prowess than Ramones. I'm not trying to compare apples to oranges here because Television and the Ramones are two absolutely different bands, however, it is necessary to explain in order to differentiate Television from the rest of the bands with whom they inevitably get namedropped.
Marquee Moon is the first Television album, and by far, some of the most beautiful music that has ever graced my ears. The reason for my earlier vehemence against the label, "punk" was because I really don't see any reasons fitting that the group should be called "punk" musically. There is no distortion on the guitars, no sloppy three-chord thrash, and no screamed or shouted vocals. Verlaine's crooning is a perfect compliment to the well-coordinated twin-guitar weaving crafted by the musicians, in fact, Verlaine reminds me a lot of Colin from Wire. I would assume as well, that if you like Wire you would like Television.
Even though I stated that it is my opinion that this is not "punk," it is definitely not conventional rock either. The guitar solos are far from superfluous and are nothing short of jaw-dropping. It's easy to experience a wide range of emotions while listening to this album because it delves into so many areas with its melodies. The drumming is not extremely complicated or overly technical which is perfect for this sort of music.
If you're into art-rock, pre-punk, and the like, I strongly suggest checking out Television, there is very much to be enjoyed with this band.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars Guitar Heaven, Jan. 13 2004
By 
"Punk", or "not punk"? Who cares? This is a classic rock and roll album in every sense of the word, and shows us just why we love rock music so damn much. Everything within- with the possible exception of "Torn Curtain"- is tightly written, crisp sounding and incredibly cool.
See No Evil jump starts the album with what I consider the coolest intro to any song, ever. Lloyd's guitar comes in jamming one note, and the bass kicks in, and immediately Verlaine wraps his guitar around Lloyd's and they duke it out. Excellent drumming is a bonus. Venus sounds like a classic the minute you hear it, and it is. A graceful riff is adorned by Verlaine's wavery voice.
I can mention here that yes, Verlaine's voice is weakest :technical: performance. Personally, I wouldnt have it any other way- its a great contrast to the ultra tight playing. But some people might be annoyed by it, a lot, so check out the tracks here to see if you are on of those people. I love the voice, and its the most punkish thing going on here.
Friction has that great angular intro, and more excellent, fluid guitar work. This leads directly into the behemoth, the self-titled 10 minute track. Let me just say: this is the shortest 10 minute song I have ever heard. It flows brilliantly. Its structured rather like Free Bird, except without the crazy Southern feel and the solo is infinitely, infinitely better. This is the greatest solo I have ever heard. Technical playing be damned, its abso-friggin-lutely amazing. Musical chops are present but a bonus, and not the main attraction- listening to masturbatory guitar is not my favorite kind of music.
The rest of the album is much quieter, as if realizing the first four tracks have drained us. Elevation, Guiding Light and Prove It are all lovely classic sounding pieces. Torn Curtain is a little too overdramatic, and Verlaine's voice doesn't complement the over-the-top background very well.
Nonetheless, Marquee Moon is a guitar lovers dream album. The record sounds fresh, crisp as an autumn afternoon and it does remind me of the fall. Its an album sparkling with energy but containing it all, and expressing it musically. Get this, now.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars 4.5 stars - you can believe the hype here, Dec 30 2003
By A Customer
In the main, it is fair to say that I have no respect whatsoever for the thuggish attitude of much of the late 1970s "punk revolution" and the basic idea of trying to make noise rather than actual music.
However, though Television played throughout their career along this scene they were in most respects a very different band from the repetitive thuggishness of the Ramones. The tone here is soft if lively, and the songs intensely melodic throughout from the first verse of the opener "See No Evil", a dramatic rocker notable for its vocal harmonies, which were to predate a lot of what was heard on the radio in the 1980s.
"Venus", the second track, is even better: it is refreshing to hear the way in which Verlaine is so successful and truly pondering on what life should be about, and "Friction", if the soloing here is somewhat excessive, continues in that vein. "Marquee Moon" was actually really the weakest song here - for all the clear recognition the song gives from Fred Smith's first notes, it really is overlong and Verlaine's solo loses its fire long before fading out.
This fact illustrates how Richard Lloyd's fiery, yet musicianly guitar work held Verlaine's virtuosity in check to produce something much greater than the sum of its parts.
"Elevation" was the rawest track on the record, but the real centrepieces of the album were the beautiful piano-led ballads "Guiding Light" and "Torn Curtain". Here, the band's intense softness is seen at its clearest, aided by Andy Johns' uncluttered production, and the beauty both of Verlaine's voice and Lloyd's guitar work comes right to the fore. "Torn Curtain" (unfortunately edited on this CD reissue) was particularly wonderful, at times feeling like a nightmarish dream. "Prove It" was a slow groove rocker that showed Verlaine's unusual lyrical talents in full bloom.
On the whole, if occasionally rather self-indulgent, "Marquee Moon"'s delicate softness and lyrical themes were unique for their day, and "Torn Curtain" in particular sounds like a precursor of 1990s psychedelia and sadcore. "Marquee Moon" is one of the most acclaimed recordings in history, and there really are enough reasons why to justify buying it.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars A DIAMOND IN THE ROUGH, Dec 12 2003
By 
Greg Kline (Harriman, New York United States) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Marquee Moon (Expanded) (Audio CD)
Marquee Moon is simply one of the 10 best hipster
records ever made. Mike, the owner of Subterranean
records in NYC, puts it squarely at #1. Every single song
on this record is stellar. It is Passionate, explorative,
and firmly on its own unique course. It is rich in
flavor, and defys deconstruction. Due to its quirky
uniqueness, this album is an acquired taste. Like a
sushi orgasm, or LSD. Several people that I have turned
on to this record, were unimpressed at first, only to
fall in love with it later. If you like the same old common,
derivative, unimaginative, over-produced, superstar crap,
then this record is not for you. The cadence of the guitar
lines in Venus De Milo are so beautiful, they will give you
chills. In the crescendo of the title track, Verlaine makes
his guitar sound like sea gulls. Elevation is taught, edgy,
and dripping with as much mood as a song can possibly be made
to hold. Some people do not respond to the herky-jerkiness
of Verlaines vocals, but they are well suited to the material.
The album has a bit of european flavor. Actually, one has to
describe this album in broad strokes, because there is no
artist that make sense to compare them to. Television blaze
their own trail. Marquee Moon is honestly and truly a classic
masterpiece, Television's jewel. The albums Adventure (2nd
release), Television (3rd release), and several Verlaine solo
albums, all have their moments, with an occasional great song,
but they all seriously pale to Marquee Moon. It deserves a place
in any desert island list. The true test, is that this record
is as relevant and effecting today, as it was in 77. One of
my fondest memories is having seen Television and Talking Heads
on the same bill at CBGB'S, a storm of epic proportions. Helpful
note: On first listen, do not play this record as background
music. Open your mind, relax, square off with your stereo, and
enjoy the swirls of passion, subtlety, vivid color, and
otherwise, ENJOY THE RIDE!
All Good Things,
Greg
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


‹ Previous | 1 214 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

This product

Marquee Moon (Expanded)
Marquee Moon (Expanded) by Television (Audio CD - 2003)
Add to cart Add to wishlist
Only search this product's reviews