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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A 70's Drive In Cult Classic
Fast action, terrific photography, great period atmosphere, colorful characters and a first-rate rock soundtrack add up to a true drive-in classic that retains its "cult classic" reputation even after more than 30 years.
This DVD includes BOTH the 97-minute U.S. print typically seen on cable and video AND the 105-minute U.K. version which includes a couple...
Published on May 30 2004 by Michael Gerstbrein

versus
1.0 out of 5 stars So pointless it MUST be high art.
I'd been a Primal Scream fan ever since their CD "Vanishing Point" came out in 1997...clearly one of the best CD's of the 1990's...and so I was enthralled with the idea of this movie that was said to influence so much of that CD.
Having finally gotten the opportunity to see it with the advent of this DVD, I HAVE to wonder just what in the name of all that...
Published on March 13 2004 by Johnny Sideburns


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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A 70's Drive In Cult Classic, May 30 2004
By 
Michael Gerstbrein "Extreme Music And Movie Buff" (Iowa City, IA United States) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Vanishing Point (DVD)
Fast action, terrific photography, great period atmosphere, colorful characters and a first-rate rock soundtrack add up to a true drive-in classic that retains its "cult classic" reputation even after more than 30 years.
This DVD includes BOTH the 97-minute U.S. print typically seen on cable and video AND the 105-minute U.K. version which includes a couple of flashbacks featuring Charlotte Rampling that for some reason were completely excised for U.S. release. The excised scenes add just a tad more insight into Kowalski's character; while not essential to the whole plot (such as it is), these scenes ARE interesting and definitely will be appreciated by hardcore fans of the film. Kudos to 20th Century Fox for making available both versions. Being a real fan of the era that this movie was shot in, it's a kick to hear director Richard C. Sarafian's commentary track. Highly recommended!
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Much more than a car chase movie, July 11 2004
By 
Duane L. Burright Jr. (Malibu, CA United States) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Vanishing Point (DVD)
This movie held me spellbound the first time I saw it and is still capable of this after countless viewings. This is more than just a car chase movie, it actually has depth and a story to tell. The scenery of the great American West is also first rate and the soundtrack never fails to set the mood.
The story of the main character, an auto delivery driver named Kowalski unfolds as he takes delivery of a white '70 Dodge Challenger which is as he puts it `souped up to 160' and proceeds to drive it from Denver to San Francisco. His plan, however is to do this in 15 hours to win a bet. As Kowalski makes his journey his life is revealed to us through flashbacks and recollections which are usually triggered by what is currently happening to him in real time. Through these the viewer learns that despite his apparent lawless behavior, Kowalski is a man of good character.
It is this good character, sense of duty and strong moral code that led to Kowalski's fallout with the establishment. He had been a decorated war hero and was honorably discharged from the military. A few years later, he was a decorated policeman. However, when he saw his police partner behaving in an unsavory fashion, he reacted. His reward was to be dishonorably discharged from the police force. This ultimately led Kowalski down the path to where we are introduced to him.
One of the big things that drew me into this movie is that it doesn't hand you the explanations on a silver platter. Instead it allows you to think about it and draw your own conclusions long after you've seen it. Some reviewers on IMDB have already done a great job of touching on the philosophies of freedom and individualism prevalent in this movie, so I won't waste the time trying to top those. I'll add that I feel this is a type of an expressionist film. Kowalski is kind of an `Everyman' who is on a journey to find his place in the grand scheme of things. Along his path he encounters various characters that watch over him and help him along, but there are also those who wish to shut him down. Whether you think the conclusion of Kowalski's journey is successful or not is up to you.
Another big plus is the realism in the driving scenes, where the drivers are actually driving their machines and occasionally things happen like tires going flat or the car needs fuel. Most modern car chase sequences leave me wanting with all of the computer generated car moves and general lack of realism. I know they sometimes got it wrong back then too, doing things like obviously speeding the film up. In this one though, they got it right. The driving here brings us into that realm of manhandling 4000 lbs. of American Iron, in all the glory of big-block V8 roar, screaming smoking tires, and hands grappling with the steering wheel.
Another thing that's cool to me about this type of movie is the appearance of the car. At the beginning, the car is resplendent in gleaming chrome and white paint. As the story moves along, the car gradually gets a more dusty battered countenance. I won't spoil the end, but those who've seen it know.
The final things that tie this whole thing together are the soundtrack and scenery. They seem to go hand in hand, from the upbeat rock & roll as Kowalski starts out to the stirring guitar strains during the thoughtful moments. I also cannot say enough about the scenery, which really draws the viewer in. It ranges from the mountains of Colorado, across Utah and into the searing Nevada desert.
In closing, I'll say that this is one of my favorite movies. It won't be understood by everyone, but those of us who fantasize about getting in a classic car and blasting down an open two-lane highway devoid of SUV's, sport sedans and minivans will likely get it.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Kowalski throws in the clutch, March 25 2004
This review is from: Vanishing Point (DVD)
Anti-hero Kowalski has had an eventful and troubled life as a Vietnam vet, policeman, motorcycle racer, and off-track racer. He is now reduced to the more mundane job of a car delivery driver. In his latest assignment - delivering a car from Colorado to California - he starts down a path of self-destruction for no apparent reason. The car, a supercharged Dodge Challenger with no equal, has given him the chance to begin his journey out of society and into the abyss.
He outruns the police in several states, brooding all the way over his past, and digs himself deeper and deeper into trouble with the law. He also meets a variety of characters along the way. His exploits are reported by a funky DJ and he becomes a counterculture hero.
Although Kowalski seems to drift through life with no purpose, like the protagonist in "The Stranger," he never loses his humanity. This is evident when he encounters a total jerk in a Jaguar who taunts him and engages him in a drag race. After the Jaguar driver runs off the road and crashes, Kowalski runs back to see if he is alright, putting himself at risk of being caught by the police, who are in pursuit and not far off.
The movie ages well. The early 70's images don't come off as corny, but rather as a clear snapshot of the time, much like "Saturday Night Fever" gives a snapshot of the late 70's. This is not just another car chase movie with fruit stands being knocked over. It's a thoroughly enjoyable tale of existentialism and defiance that reflects the tensions of the period.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Vanishing Point, March 24 2004
By 
H. Row "in1ear" (Arvada, CO United States) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Vanishing Point (DVD)
If you were a teenager in 1971, you probably saw this from the backseat of your VW bug. Windows steamed up, rainy friday night. Boone's Farm bottles hidden discreetly (next to the seat inside the driver door). Well now the video and audio are caught up to today's standard and the movie even comes closed captioned for us Jensen / Craig stereo owners playing Hair of the Dog full tilt! Remember...? "Now you're messin with a ..."
When you're 15 or 16, it just makes sense that a grown up, like ex-cop Kowalski wants to drive a supercharged Dodge from Denver, Colorado to San Francisco in 15 hours. The powers that be have done a great job restoring both visual and audio to this film. The late Cleavon Little runs a very close second to the car as the take over star. You get to see Delaney, Bonnie (Bramlett) & Friends including Big Mama Thornton. And let's not forget the naked blond babe in the desert.
Anyway I just was not getting the right memories sitting in my comfortable living room watching this classic so if you're missing the good old days, try this: Get some friends to help carry the big screen tv set and dvd player into the garage. Get your kids old swing set and place it between you and the screen. Put up those yellow bug light spot lights just to the right or left of where the screen is. Park your car at the bottom of the drive way. Run a bad sounding speaker out to one of the side windows. Remove one windshield wiper. Turn on sprinkler system so it simulates a heavy drizzle. About 30 minutes of the movie, run into the house and tear up a $20 bill. Bring back popcorn, nachos, cokes for the kids, cups of ice for the grown ups (still only a quarter each.) Forget napkins, and going to restroom. And go back and enjoy the movie! To add realism honk your horn, moon passers by, and flash headlights at screen!
Throw trash on your lawn and drive off with speaker still in your car. Watch broken glass as your leaving. Drive around for a few hours or stop to neck. Then sneak into your own house before your teenage children get home.
This is a "have fun" and enjoy movie. The bonuses are almost none existent (a 20 second TV trailer, a 1:00 minute TV trailer) and that sort of stuff.
Don't criticize this one by comparing it to the new ones, just smile shake your head and reminisce. I still want that Challenger and Bullitt's Mustang AND CHARGER. No sissy toyotas in my movies!!!
John Row
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5.0 out of 5 stars Escape From Planet Earth, March 20 2004
This review is from: Vanishing Point (DVD)
My favorite road movie of all time. I think this is a better film than Easy Rider. Barry Newman's subtle non-machismo performance is the perfect contrast to the awesome muscle car which carries him to his vanishing point. I just listened to the dvd commentary track by director Richard C Sarafian, where he claims his choice for Newman's role was Gene Hackman. I don't think Hackman could have done a better job, in fact the balance of the car and the driver would not have been the same. Gene Hackman is an incredible actor, but Barry Newman was, in my opinion, ideal for this film. A work of great beauty, and the haunting loss of a freer epoch. Incredible handheld cinematography by the late great John A Alonzo, married to an uplifting and deeply poignant soundtrack. This film can be viewed on many different levels from an exciting car chase movie to a true American existential classic. I never get tired of works of art and Vanishing Point is such a work. I can't understand why 20th Century Fox failed to put out a soundtrack album. "Another Soul Goes Free"
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1.0 out of 5 stars So pointless it MUST be high art., March 13 2004
This review is from: Vanishing Point (DVD)
I'd been a Primal Scream fan ever since their CD "Vanishing Point" came out in 1997...clearly one of the best CD's of the 1990's...and so I was enthralled with the idea of this movie that was said to influence so much of that CD.
Having finally gotten the opportunity to see it with the advent of this DVD, I HAVE to wonder just what in the name of all that is holy was Bobby Gillespie thinking? This movie, simply put, is an exercise in nothingness. It's not that I'm down on existentialism...but if I wanted a dose of it I'd read Camus.
The story involves a seemingly aimless type called Kowalski who works for a vehicle delivery service. He is given the task of driving a Dodge Challenger from Denver to San Francisco. He has from Friday night until Monday morning to do this.
For reasons never sufficiently explained, he feels the need to prove that he can drive the distance in 15 hours. For further incentive, he places a wager with his amphetamines dealer that he can do it. The staggering amount of the wager? Simply the cost of the speed he doses on for the trip.
That's IT. That's the movie.
Oh, there are some well-filmed shots of the American natural landscape and there are some mildly interesting flashback sequences that attempt to give Kowalski depth...but the character simply lacks any degree of charisma that would make any background he might've had seem at all interesting. He meets and interacts with a few characters, stereotypical wasters, hitchhikers and assorted desert crazies who (along with Cleavon Little, the blind DJ who acts as the conscience of the movie if not the entire country at the time) are assumed to to aiders and abettors of Kowalski, whose quest has somehow taken on Odysseyan proportions in the few hours it's taken him cross from Colorado to Nevada.
Why would anyone care about this? What is on the line? What degree of oppression is a drive from Denver to San Francisco going to lift? How in blazes do you drive a car with a big-block V-8 at high speeds while being pursued by the police across two state lines (and through a desert) while only stopping for gas once? None of these questions are ever adequately answered (or even considered, apparently).
Without giving away the conclusion of the movie, I will say that this movie had the absolute worst ending I've ever seen. I was left wondering what anyone EVER saw in this movie...and wondering just how many ways I could have better spent my time.
This disc contains both the US and the UK versions of the film; it was the UK version that I watched. I can't possibly imagine how even more bland and tedious the US version must be without the footage included in the UK film...and I'm not likely to find out; I think so little of this movie that even the thought of sitting through the commentary tracks (which I make it a point to do on every DVD that includes this feature) seems impossibly unmanageable to me now. Don't believe the hype; this movie does not even remotely warrant the heaps of praise its cult of fans have lain upon it.
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5.0 out of 5 stars "This radio station is named Kowalski...", March 11 2004
By 
Cubist (United States) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Vanishing Point (DVD)
Vanishing Point is one of the great existential counter-culture films of the 1970s. Like the similar-minded films, most notably, Two-Lane Blacktop and Duel, this car chase movie features an anti-hero protagonist who equates the open road with freedom and staying in one place for too long with death. For years we have had to suffer with pan and scanned VHS copies but now it has finally arrived on DVD in its original aspect ratio.
Fans of Vanishing Point are in for a real treat as both the US and UK versions of the film have been made available on DVD. The UK version runs seven minutes longer and features a scene where Kowalski picks up a female hitchhiker.
Director Richard C. Sarafian contributes an engaging audio commentary. So little has been written about Vanishing Point and it is great to hear Sarafian talk at length about his experiences making the movie.
Also included are vintage TV spots and a theatrical trailer that features wonderfully kitschy ad copy: "Everyone wants a piece of his hide!"
Vanishing Point is a cult film that has endured over the years. UK music group Primal Scream named their 1997 album after the movie and even recorded a song entitled "Kowalski" that features samples from the movie. Audioslave took their love of the film even further and brilliantly recreated and condensed the movie into a music video for their song, "Show Me How To Live." The video incorporates actual footage from the movie and replaces Kowalski with the band. After years of obscurity, Vanishing Point has finally been given proper DVD treatment with an excellent transfer and made both versions available for fans to compare and contrast.
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4.0 out of 5 stars The Last American Cowboy, Feb. 17 2004
By 
Daniel R. Sanderman (Portland, OR United States) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Vanishing Point (DVD)
"Vanishing Point" is a film that follows a very powerful storytelling device: tell the audience where the story ends, then take them there. We know Kowalski's fate before the film begins and yet still we find ourselves rooting for his victory. In the film, Kowalski sets out on an impossible mission: make it from Denver to San Francisco in a matter of hours while evading the cops. Along the way, we get glimpses of Kowalski's past, a history of disenchantment with war, the government, the system, etc. This disenchantment is picked up by those who support "the last American cowboy's" journey. His quest for speed comes to represent his defiance of authority and his path to victory. On one level, Kowalski becomes the sacrificial victim at the cost of losing a bet and a few speeding tickets. On a different level, Kowalski's quest becomes a path to freedom and, in the end, complete freedom.
"Vanishing Point" does not have an excess of dialogue. This film could have been a silent picture for all intensive purposes. The themes and storyline are so simple and clear that one does not need much dialogue for the story to unfold. With some great shots of the 1970 Challenger and some gorgeous countryside and flatlands, "Vanishing Point" makes for a great film for all car enthusiasts and those who enjoy a more artistically driven film than most.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Kowalski Rides Again, Feb. 11 2004
This review is from: Vanishing Point (DVD)
'Vanishing Point' still resonates within my soul, some 34 years after it was filmed. This latest release in DVD offers great extras (Sarafian's commentary and the extra scenes edited out of the original release make it worthwhile). Vanishing Point has not a single allure, it has many. It is Kowalski, the Challenger, the music, the trip and yes it is (was) the times, all of which make it very personal for me, having lived them. So much so that in the summer of 2003 I retraced Kowalski's path from Colorado through Utah and Nevada in my 1970 Challenger RT. It's a long, long ride but the scenery is still magnificent and the Challenger still dominates the highway (and surprises the occassional state trooper like the one who eyed me just outside of Eureka, Nevada - arriving a minute earlier he would have heard me go by at 140 mph. And they say you can't go home again...of course you can :) If you didn't live it or can't drive it, then by all means see it - you're not likely to be dissapointed.
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5.0 out of 5 stars A Low Budget Film That is Surprisingly Good, Feb. 7 2004
By 
Jonnie Santos (San Diego, CA USA) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Vanishing Point (DVD)
You may need to be over 40 to appreciate the social contrasts of American life in 1971 and today. In April of that year an estimated 500,000 Americans were in Washington DC protesting against our involvement in Vietnam. Howard Hughes was still living; NASA sent a probe to Mars while the crew of Apollo 15 was riding for the first time in the Lunar Rover. Charles Manson and 'family' were found guilty for the murder of Sharon Tate. The U.A.E. (United Arab Emirates) was formed this year, so was the Libertarian party in the USA. The Concord SST was doing flight tests, Intel announced their 4004 chip, and the movie Vanishing Point began showing in our local movie houses.
The star of the movie is not the '70 Dodge Challenger; rather the star is the freedom the car and its driver are trying to attain through speed, and ultimately death. Most of us never know when we'll die, yet the character Kowalski seems to have one up on us. He has been running through life's trials like questions with multiple choice answers, eliminating the obvious wrong answers first.
The vast open spaces the cinematography so wonderfully capture frame the path to the Pearly Gates; rather a crack of light between the blades of a couple of CAT dozers that Director Sarafian refers to as a crack in the fence. Kowalski's soul is about to be set free and the Challenger is just the vehicle that can go fast enough to do it.
As Insurance company's rates soared for muscle cars and Emissions standards pummeled high output engines, the whole muscle car era faded to black in a few years. The movie Vanishing Point is a time machine - the beginning of the end.
The DVD version is by far my favorite which includes Mr. Sarafian's narration as an option. I would have loved to have heard Barry Newman and Clevon Little (sadly deceased in 1992), and or some of the crew with Sarafian discuss the making of the film. There's also a UK version of the film including the cut scenes with Charlotte Rampling (great scene). This is definitely one to add to your library. 5 Stars in my book.
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Vanishing Point
Vanishing Point by Richard C. Sarafian (DVD - 2004)
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