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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Tout est parfait en ce concerne la qualité et la rapidité de livraison.
Tout est parfait en ce concerne la qualité et la rapidité de livraison.

C'est exactement ce que je recherchait.

Merci
Published 14 months ago by Pierre Ouellette

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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars DVD buyers beware!!!
The DVD release of THE INVISIBLE MAN has one scene that is noticeably different from the VHS and LD releases. In that scene Kemp is listening to the radio. What's playing on the radio in the VHS and LD versions (and, presumably, in the original 1933 release prints) is a vintage jazz tune typical of the era. For the DVD release MCA or Universal apparently no longer had...
Published on March 10 2001 by James M. Knuttel


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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Tout est parfait en ce concerne la qualité et la rapidité de livraison., Feb. 19 2013
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: The Invisible Man (Legacy Collection) (DVD)
Tout est parfait en ce concerne la qualité et la rapidité de livraison.

C'est exactement ce que je recherchait.

Merci
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5.0 out of 5 stars You can't see me, Nov. 7 2013
By 
bernie "xyzzy" (Arlington, Texas) - See all my reviews
(TOP 100 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: The Invisible Man (DVD)
Writer R.C. Sherriff and Director James Whale took a thinly valid H.G. Wells social commentary "The Invisible Man" and made a great 1933 movie that is worth watching and watching and watching again.

Claude Rains, who played such characters as Julius Caesar in Caesar and Cleopatra (1945), makes an excellent "The Invisible Man" as a scientist that perfects invisibility only to find the side effects are megalomania leading to insanity.

Can he be saved?
Watch and see.
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great movies, Jan. 10 2012
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: The Invisible Man (Legacy Collection) (DVD)
Recommend to any fan of the "Invisible man". 4 great movies, going from mystery to comedy to war and back to mystery. Although the movies are in "B&W" and you do see, sometimes, the "invisible wires"; all 4 movies are masterpieces by themselves. 4 different ways of becoming invisible with 4 different story lines. Great cinematographic technologies. A must for the fan of nostalgic B&W mystery movies.
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars An Universal movie monster that you must see!, May 24 2004
By 
Durango Kid "Alex" (Brasília, DF Brazil) - See all my reviews
This review is from: The Invisible Man (DVD)
'Invisible Man, The' is one of the most sucessful Universal monster movies of the thirties, along with 'Frankstein' and 'Dracula'. A superior adaptation of a H.G. Welles novel, the movie has humour, suspense and a excelent development of the story that made this movie actual for all ages.
Claude Rains (the actor that made 'Phantom of the Opera) gives life to Jack Griffin, a young scientist that discover a strange formula to turn himself invisible and goes crazy along the process. The movie has some great scenes,like the tricks that Griffin plays with the people of a little village and the persecutions of the police, always confused by the inteligent and unusual invisible enemy. Great special effects for the time makes the movies even more valuable and Rains gives a strong and convincible performance, although all the time 'invisible' for the public.
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars DVD buyers beware!!!, March 10 2001
By 
James M. Knuttel (Alta Loma, CA USA) - See all my reviews
This review is from: The Invisible Man (DVD)
The DVD release of THE INVISIBLE MAN has one scene that is noticeably different from the VHS and LD releases. In that scene Kemp is listening to the radio. What's playing on the radio in the VHS and LD versions (and, presumably, in the original 1933 release prints) is a vintage jazz tune typical of the era. For the DVD release MCA or Universal apparently no longer had the rights to that tune (and, also apparently, did not try to re-acquire the rights, even though it probably wouldn't have been too much trouble). Thus in the DVD release "new" music was substituted, so now Kemp is listening to a digital piano recording of "Hearts and Flowers"!
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3 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Where'd he go?!!!??, Dec 25 2008
By 
Paul Boudreau ""movie freak"" (New Brunswick, Canada) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: The Invisible Man (Legacy Collection) (DVD)
I had never seen any of these movies before and thought this would be a great way to see them all. Each movie is sharp and clear, no major scratchs or wavy lines. Or corse the best is the first Invisible Man. I would say run out and get this one if you don't have it.
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4.0 out of 5 stars The invisible man attacks!, May 1 2011
By 
E. A Solinas "ea_solinas" (MD USA) - See all my reviews
(TOP 10 REVIEWER)    (HALL OF FAME)   
This review is from: The Invisible Man (DVD)
Among classic horror movies, "The Invisible Man" has never really loomed as large as Dracula, Frankenstein or the Wolf-Man. However, this classic adaptation of H.G. Wells' sci-fi novel is still a pretty entertaining affair, with an increasingly crazed Claude Rains chewing the scenery with invisible teeth. I just wish they hadn't added a token love interest.

A strange man (Rains) arrives at a hotel in Iping, wrapped up in goggles, bandages, scarves, and heavy clothes. He spends most of his time hidden away in his room, doing odd scientific experiments -- but after a fight with his landlord, he reveals that he is actually invisible. Up next: After shedding his clothes and bandages, he goes on a rampage through the town... still totally unseen.

The invisible man -- aka Dr. Jack Griffin -- escapes to the house of Dr. Kemp, a former coworker whom he turns into his frightened "partner." Just like anybody who's turned invisible would, Griffin plans a reign of terror over the entire world. As the police begin a country-wide hunt for a man they're unable to see, there is only one way that Griffin can be drawn out...

"The Invisible Man" isn't quite as well-known as Universal's vampires, monsters and werewolves, mainly because he's just an average guy who turned invisible. It's still a freaky idea, though -- not only is Griffin unable to become visible again, but ordinary people are being tormented by a criminal that could literally be anywhere. Except a paint factory.

And classic director James Whale manages to insert plenty of ghastly moments, such as a crazily laughing Griffin removing his false nose and goggles, turning his bandaged face into a skull-like mask. And he maintains some of the weird humor from H.G. Wells' original story, which you pretty much expect from a person who's invisible -- at one point Griffin dances down the street, wearing only a pair of pants and singing "Here we go gathering nuts in May!"

The downside? Some of the deviations from Wells' original story weaken the movie badly, especially the inclusion of Gloria Stuart as Griffin's girlfriend. All she does is cry, mope and make doe eyes. Seriously, what was the point of that character?

Fortunately, Claude Rains manages to single-handedly carry the entire movie -- he's grandiose, insanely malicious, and chews the scenery with unseen teeth. He's a little hammy at times, mainly because his face is invisible for 99% of the movie, but it's a truly spellbinding performance. There are a lot of good smaller performances among the villagers and the police, although that landlady's grating screech makes me wish the Invisible Man had bandaged HER head.

"The Invisible Man" isn't quite as memorable as the other Universal monster flicks, but it's still an effective piece of sci-fi horror -- and Claude Rains puts in a great performance without showing his face.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Classic Monster Movie Thriller, May 27 2004
By A Customer
This review is from: Invisible Man (VHS Tape)
This movie is 1 of of the 6 classic monsters
i saw it 3 in a half years ago on AMC'S Monster fest 2000
not that bad of a movie i liked it then i kept seeing it pop up on AMC throughout the weeks to come .. its really hit the spot light of Special Effects and even a little bitta humor in the movie i like it and i think every1 should buy the private collection movie of this classic universal SHOCKER
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5.0 out of 5 stars He may be invisible, but The Invisible Man is a must-see, April 4 2004
By 
Daniel Jolley "darkgenius" (Shelby, North Carolina USA) - See all my reviews
(TOP 50 REVIEWER)    (REAL NAME)   
This review is from: The Invisible Man (DVD)
The Invisible Man is one of the most impressive Universal "monster" films of the 1930s, a motion picture masterpiece still as vibrant and engaging now as it was in 1933. It is also a representative of the rarest of movies - one which succeeds much better than the novel upon which it was based. Don't get me wrong - H.G. Wells was a brilliant writer, one of the two founding fathers of science fiction, but The Invisible Man left me as cold as the invisible man must have felt running around naked in the bitterly cold countryside. The invisible man is thoroughly unlikable in the novel, much more so than he is here. A running time of just 71 minutes and a brilliant tour de force of a film debut by Claude Raines make Jack Griffin a fascinating albeit quite mad character who never completely turns the viewer off with his misguided antics. Of course, the sword cuts both ways. In the novel, one gets a much deeper appreciation of the pain and struggle the man faces trying to restore himself to visibility. In the movie, the transition to raving megalomaniac occurs much more quickly, with several palliative dashes of humor thrown into the mix early on.
There isn't that much to the story, really. A man wrapped in bandages and clothed in a long overcoat, glasses, and hat suddenly enters the Lion's Head pub and inn one snowy night demanding a room. He makes it very clear that he wants privacy and soon begins performing chemical experiments. The fellow is a scientist named Jack Griffin (Claude Rains), a young chap who, after five years of private work, discovered the secret of invisibility; unfortunately for him, he has yet to figure out an antidote, as becomes evident when he begins to shed his clothes and bandages - yep, the title was right, he really is the invisible man. Now most fellows, were they to become invisible, would probably run right out and try to see the girl next door in her birthday suit, but Griffin is different. That special ingredient in the potion tends to make a person just a little bit insane, and Griffin has already begun forming plans to get filthy rich and make the world grovel at his invisible feet. His surly attitude and just plain weirdness soon get him evicted, and soon his secret is out. He has a jolly good time playing pranks on local villagers, but his pranks soon turn to mass murder. The police dragnet is fun to watch (it isn't easy to catch an invisible man), but the movie takes a continually darker tone as the inevitable conclusion approaches. I am of the belief that the story of The Invisible Man really doesn't teach any sort of lesson with it, although others are certainly free to voice their own interpretations of the story. Griffin is just too disagreeable to teach me anything (apart from the ubiquitous "don't meddle in God's domain" thing).
The special effects in the film are actually quite amazing. Many of them are rather simple but well-done, and the central bits featuring clothes walking around on their own serve the story very well indeed. There is one scene featuring a pair of pants skipping down the road accompanied by Griffin singing the kind of ditty a madman might be prone to sing that is absolutely priceless. Alongside Dracula and Frankenstein, The Invisible Man completes the threesome of truly must-see 1930s Universal "monster" films, even though we all know it's really pure science fiction and not horror.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Claude Raines was spectacular!, Nov. 14 2003
This review is from: Invisible Man (VHS Tape)
Even though we don't see him till the very last scene, Claude Raines gives probably his best performance. This was by far the best invisible man themed movie that I have seen.
There are some really tense parts especially after Raines tells Kemp he is going to kill him. There is also some extremely amusing scenes (Raines going through the countryside with nothing but a basket and singing a children's song while scarring all the townfolk.
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