Customer Reviews


620 Reviews
5 star:
 (424)
4 star:
 (57)
3 star:
 (25)
2 star:
 (18)
1 star:
 (96)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favourable review
The most helpful critical review


118 of 123 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Lord Of The Rings Trilogy: Extended Edition (blu ray)...another prized possession, almost perfect
VIDEO:

The Fellowship Of The Ring (Extended Edition)(blu ray):

The AVC/1080p picture is housed on two BD-50 discs (Part 1: 105 minutes; Part 2: 123 minutes). I personally appreciate what Warner Brothers/New Line is doing, in order to minimize compression defects. Changing disc also gives people a chance to visit the washroom. The previous theatrical...
Published on July 1 2011 by Dr. Joseph Lee

versus
336 of 386 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars This does not contain the Extended Versions of the films!
Be warned that this BD release is the original theatrical versions of the film, not the extended editions! The studio pulled exactly the same stunt for the DVD releases of the LOTR trilogy and declined to release both the theatrical and extended versions of the film at the same time to provide fans with a choice. This can only be viewed as attempt to sell the movie...
Published on Feb. 7 2010 by Watchmann


‹ Previous | 1 262 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

118 of 123 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Lord Of The Rings Trilogy: Extended Edition (blu ray)...another prized possession, almost perfect, July 1 2011
By 
Dr. Joseph Lee (Toronto, Canada) - See all my reviews
(TOP 10 REVIEWER)    (#1 HALL OF FAME)    (REAL NAME)   
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
VIDEO:

The Fellowship Of The Ring (Extended Edition)(blu ray):

The AVC/1080p picture is housed on two BD-50 discs (Part 1: 105 minutes; Part 2: 123 minutes). I personally appreciate what Warner Brothers/New Line is doing, in order to minimize compression defects. Changing disc also gives people a chance to visit the washroom. The previous theatrical versions were mired in controversy due to the digital noise reduction (DNR) used on Fellowship of the Ring. The video has been completely remastered from the film's 2K digital files, and the result is a vast improvement in details: beards never get blurry, not once, and facial features remain pure. Blacks are inky. The new controversy is the greenish tinge, because the colour timing was redone. Thus, the picture looked different from the original DVD version. But according to the studio, this colour timing was approved by Peter Jackson and cinematographer Andrew Lesnie. Overall, the picture was very pleasing. But don't be surprised when future prequels (The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey, due in theatre December 2012, and The Hobbit: There And Back Again, due in theatre December 2013) are out that the studios may triple dip with another "newly remastered" version of the film. (4/5)

The Two Towers (Extended Edition)(blu ray):

The AVC/1080p picture is housed on two BD-50 discs (Part 1: 107 minutes; Part 2: 129 minutes). The presentation was magnificent, with great details and strong black levels. Contrast is excellent. (5/5)

The Return Of The King (Extended Edition)(blu ray):

The AVC/1080p picture is housed on two BD-50 discs (Part 1: 128 minutes; Part 2: 135 minutes). Fine detail is abundant, with lovely contrast and accurate color. The image is delicately textured and highly dimensional. The sweeping shot as King Théoden and his Rohirrim charge the advancing line of Mûmakil on the fields of Pelennor looks almost three-dimensional. (5/5)

AUDIO:

The audio in all three films is in DTS-HD MA 6.1. In one word: perfect!! All three tracks are nothing short of splendid, with pitch perfect dynamics, wonderful directionality, constant and appropriate localization effects, superb clarity, impeccable prioritization, wonderful volume spikes, and plenty of down and dirty bass to keep the entire experience engaging, no matter how thoroughly worn out you are by the length of the material. The soundstage is constantly filled, putting you in the middle of the experience throughout the entire affair. This trilogy, with three powerful DTS-HD Master Audio 6.1 mixes, is one reason why this release may rule them all. (5+/5)

There are a total of 15 discs with extensive supplements. This extended blu ray edition will provide many hours of enjoyment for the whole family for years to come: like a Lord Of The Rings marathon during a long weekend. Although it is not perfect, it is still considered the ultimate, definitive Lord Of The Rings for now. Highly recommended.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


21 of 22 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The best there is. Will be hard to top., Feb. 28 2007
By 
Billy Bill "B." (Montréal, Québec, Canada) - See all my reviews
As much as I love Star Wars, this is definitely the best trilogy ever made.

Do I really need to say everything you probably read or heard somewhere already? Yes, all three films are equally great. They were all shot together after all.

Fellowship of the Ring is about as strong an opening chapter as

you could ask for. Two Towers makes you forget it's just a middle chapter

because it's just as brilliant and... Return of the King sets a new standard for the finale of an epic trilogy.

As if owning the best trilogy ever made wasn't enough, these extended editions are superior to the original theatrical versions. They make the films feel more complete. Oh yeah and all those extras are so detailed you'll want to check out everything though you probably will never find the time to do so. Basically, this set may look expensive but it's worth every

dollar.

By the way, if you love the movies, I highly recommend the books. They're

absolutely wonderful as well and I'm not a big reader.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


79 of 85 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars French version included (français), Jan. 29 2012
Just to say, there are both english AND FRENCH audio option!

Pour les francophones, il y a la version anglaise ET la version française dans ce coffret blu-ray! :)
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Only contains THREE disks !, Feb. 13 2013
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
I read the product description from Amazon (inserted below) and expected to get 12 disks in total.
There are THREE in the pack.

Just thought I'd post this so that you know what you will be getting ...

-----------------------------------
Product Description

Amazon.ca

The extended editions of Peter Jackson's The Lord of the Rings present the greatest trilogy in film history in the most ambitious sets in DVD history. In bringing J.R.R. Tolkien's nearly unfilmable work to the screen, Jackson benefited from extraordinary special effects, evocative New Zealand locales, and an exceptionally well-chosen cast, but most of all from his own adaptation with co-writers Fran Walsh and Philippa Boyens, preserving Tolkien's vision and often his very words, but also making logical changes to accommodate the medium of film. While purists complained about these changes and about characters and scenes left out of the films, the almost two additional hours of material in the extended editions (about 11 hours total) help appease them by delving more deeply into Tolkien's music, the characters, and loose ends that enrich the story, such as an explanation of the Faramir-Denethor relationship, and the appearance of the Mouth of Sauron at the gates of Mordor. In addition, the extended editions offer more bridge material between the films, further confirming that the trilogy is really one long film presented in three pieces (which is why it's the greatest trilogy ever--there's no weak link). The scene of Galadriel's gifts to the Fellowship added to the first film proves significant over the course of the story, while the new Faramir scene at the end of the second film helps set up the third and the new Saruman scene at the beginning of the third film helps conclude the plot of the second.

To top it all off, the extended editions offer four discs per film: two for the longer movie, plus four commentary tracks and stupendous DTS 6.1 ES sound; and two for the bonus material, which covers just about everything from script creation to special effects. The argument was that fans would need both versions because the bonus material is completely different, but the features on the theatrical releases are so vastly inferior that the only reason a fan would need them would be if they wanted to watch the shorter versions they saw in theaters (the last of which, The Return of the King, merely won 12 Oscars). The LOTR extended editions without exception have set the DVD standard by providing a richer film experience that pulls the three films together and further embraces Tolkien's world, a reference-quality home theater experience, and generous, intelligent, and engrossing bonus features. --David Horiuchi
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


19 of 21 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Completely worth the upgrade, Aug. 4 2011
With so many (deserved) critical accolades heaped on this franchise the question is not 'is this set any good?' it's 'is it worth it?' The answer is, unequivocally, YES. I could rave about the new transfer along with everyone else (it's great) but, in practical terms, the films look much better. Upconverting was never a friend to the DVD releases, seeming to bring out the flaws as much as the detail. The Blu-Rays resolve that problem and (for the most part) make these films look like the visual masterpieces they were in the theatre.

All of the 'Appendices' of the DVD release are here, along with the Costa Botes 'Making of'' documentaries that were previously only available in the limited edition DVD sets. Grittier than the other extras, these feature-length documentaries offer a different perspective on the films and are a nice treat for the LotR fan who thinks they've seen everything.

Masterful as this set is, there are a few things people may quibble over. The films are each spread over two Blu-Rays, a necessary concession for the quality of the transfer but some people might find it annoying. The features are all presented in SD, though I personally don't think remastering them would've added much value. Finally, there's the infamous 'green tint' some people note on Fellowship; I can't see it, even when I look for it, but some people might feel differently.

Rumours persist about some mythical 'Extended-Extended Edition' of the films, containing even more deleted scenes and extras that have never seen the light of day. Personally, I call shenanigans on such talk but, even if you believe it, such a boxed won't see the light of day until well after The Hobbit Extended Editions have been released (2015 or later). Given that fact, there's no reason for a Lord of the Rings fan not to pick this set up.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars "Lord" rules, March 19 2007
By 
E. A Solinas "ea_solinas" (MD USA) - See all my reviews
(HALL OF FAME)    (TOP 50 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: The Lord of the Rings: the Motion Picture Trilogy (Fellowship of the Ring / the Two Towers / Return of the King Theatrical Editions) (DVD)
J.R.R. Tolkien's "Lord of the Rings" trilogy was considered unfilmable for a very long time -- the story was too big, too fantastical. But in the late 1990s, New Zealand director Peter Jackson got the green light to shoot the "Lord of the Rings" movie trilogy, a frightening undertaking. But Jackson was up to the challenge. The rest... is film history.

"The Fellowship of the Ring" introduces us to the hobbits. Eccentric old Bilbo Baggins (Ian Holm) leaves the peaceful Shire at his 111st birthday, leaving all he has to his young nephew Frodo (Elijah Wood) -- including a golden Ring that makes the wearer invisible. But the grey wizard Gandalf (Ian McKellen) reveals that it's actually the One Ring, which is the source of power for the demonic Dark Lord Sauron. Horrified, Frodo and his best pals leave the Shire and join a band of elves, men, and dwarves to take the Ring to the only place where it can be destroyed.

"The Two Towers" picks up immediately after "Fellowship" ends. Frodo and Sam (Sean Astin) are lost on the path to Mordor. Worse, they're being stalked by Gollum (Andy Serkis), who owned the Ring for centuries and is enslaved to it. But because he knows safe ways into Mordor, Frodo lets Gollum come along. Elsewhere, Aragorn (Viggo Mortensen), Legolas (Orlando Bloom), and Gimli (John Rhys-Davies) make a desperate stand against the orc armies with the kingdom of Rohan....

"Return of the King" brings the trilogy to a head. Frodo and Sam's friendship is threatened by Gollum's trickery -- and Frodo is led into a deadly trap. Elsewhere, Gandalf rides with Pippin (Billy Boyd) to Gondor, the kingdom that Aragorn is heir to. Aragorn summons an army of ghosts and attacks the heart of Mordor -- as Frodo and Sam arrive at the volcanic Mount Doom, where the Ring was forged. But can Frodo bring himself to destroy the Ring?

A lot of people were nervous when first hearing that "Lord of the Rings" was being translated onto the big screen. There were just too many things -- goofy scripting, bad special effects, mutilated characters -- that could go wrong. In fact, it had already been wrecked in a few prior attempts.

Those fears turned out to be pretty much unfounded. Some characters are different from what they are in the book (Faramir and Arwen, for example, are altered and added to), and a handful are gone altogether. But as both an adaptation and a cinematic experience, this is a winner.

Jackson and Co. outdid themselves with nearly every aspect of the films. The scripting is impeccable, a good balance of dark and light, humor and horror. The sets and New Zealand landscapes are breathtaking, as the cameras pan over snowy plains and mountaintops. And the special effects are almost entirely convincing-looking, especially the gruesome Gollum. He's the first fully convincing CGI character, and after awhile you'll forget he is made digitally.

Elijah Wood is outstanding as Frodo Baggins. He runs the emotional gamut: fear, pain, horror, happiness, resignation, rage, love, lust and emptiness. Sean Astin is equally good as the steadfast Sam, Frodo's best friend. Supporting hobbits Dominic Monaghan and Billy Boyd get to grow up into mature young men.

But as lovable as the hobbits are, they do not dominate all of the screen: Ian McKellen is excellent as the grandfatherly wizard Gandalf. Viggo Mortensen, Christopher Lee, Hugo Weaving, Liv Tyler, John Rhys-Davies, Orlando Bloom and Sean Bean are only part of the amazing supporting cast, all of whom give excellent performances.

The movie adaptation of the "Lord of the Rings" trilogy has been accepted by most fans and critics alike. Why? Because the trilogy is among the best movies ever put to film. A stunning achievement.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Great but not perfect, Aug. 10 2011
By 
C. Labouisse - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
The extended versions have already been published in DVD The Lord of the Rings: Special Extended Edition Trilogy (12 Discs) (Widescreen) this is a Blu Ray version of this package.

THE improvement of the Blu Ray version is the inclusion of HD versions of the movies. Image and sound are great although there is a buzz regarding the new color timing of the Fellowship. No changes on the bonuses which are in SD but no big deal IMHO.

Packaging is far from being on par with the DVD edition but it is OK. The biggest annoyance is the inclusion of FIVE trailers that you have to skip individually since the direct access to the menu is forbidden. That sucks badly.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


31 of 35 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Must Have!, Jan. 19 2005
By 
This 12 disc set is amazing. 2 discs each for the 3 movies, and 2 discs each for preproduction/production/post production information.
I used to think buying movies with special features (i.e., movie in the making peeks) was just a waste of money, but being a LOR fan I just had to have the extended edition set, and, Lo and Behold! ..I had as much fun watching the special features and it made me appreciate the movie more. My husband wasn't much into LOR (he isn't a 'reader'), but now he's a fan as well. We found everything else on TV boring after watching it when we got it for Christmas.
Plus, you can watch the movie 4 times more with different audio commentaries from cast and crew. It was worth it!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


336 of 386 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars This does not contain the Extended Versions of the films!, Feb. 7 2010
By 
Watchmann (Ontario, Canada) - See all my reviews
Be warned that this BD release is the original theatrical versions of the film, not the extended editions! The studio pulled exactly the same stunt for the DVD releases of the LOTR trilogy and declined to release both the theatrical and extended versions of the film at the same time to provide fans with a choice. This can only be viewed as attempt to sell the movie series multiple times to fans. If you want the extended versions of the films, wait and do not purchase this set.

That being said, if you do not want the extended theatrical versions, then by all means, purchase this set instead.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


137 of 158 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars No EE, No Buyee, Feb. 15 2010
By 
G. Hawkins "The Hawk" (Mississauga, Ontario Canada) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Hugely disappointing that the extended edition boxset is being released at a later date (and possibly as late as 2012 if the rumors are true) I love the LOTR series but once you've watched the EE versions, the theatrical versions (although very good) are just not up to the same level of enjoyment and fulfillment as the EE release. Sorry Mr Jackson, but I'll be holding off until the EE set is released no matter how long it takes. I'll rent this to see some LOTR Blu-ray eye candy 'til then.

Shame on you Warner Bros

Edit: March 29....1 week prior to release.

Well....looks like there's even more reason to wait now. The early reviews are coming in now from some of the respected Blu-ray review sites and the reviews have not been glowing. This is not going to be anywhere near the "hi-def demo material" release everyone expected it to be. Numerous complaints of sub par picture quality, excessive use of digital noise reduction and edge enhancement editing are coming in. So now the question is......will Warner hear those complaints, take heed and redo the transfer for the EE release (whenever that is) as is being done for for the noted 2009 sub par blu-ray "Gladiator"? Only time will tell.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


‹ Previous | 1 262 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

This product

Only search this product's reviews