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5.0 out of 5 stars One of Sondheim's best!
INTO THE WOODS is one of Stephen Sondheim's best musicals! INTO THE WOODS was the first musical that I ever saw (I was six) I caught the acting bug right then and there. Since that time, I've had the priviledge of acting in several productions written by Mr. Sondheim, including INTO THE WOODS.
INTO THE WOODS weaves together two of the most important things in musical...
Published on July 15 2004

versus
3.0 out of 5 stars Three-and-a-half stars ... For Sondheim, only fair
Into The Woods is a fine, entertaining show, but I have a feeling after Sondheim has been gone for 100 years this will not be considered one of his classics. Largely that's because he has set the bar so high for himself, but also because the second act is, let's admit it, just flat.
The show came out in 1987, at height of the Ronald Reagan "feel good about...
Published on March 11 2003 by The Man in the Hathaway Shirt


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5.0 out of 5 stars One of Sondheim's best!, July 15 2004
By A Customer
This review is from: Into the Woods (Audio CD)
INTO THE WOODS is one of Stephen Sondheim's best musicals! INTO THE WOODS was the first musical that I ever saw (I was six) I caught the acting bug right then and there. Since that time, I've had the priviledge of acting in several productions written by Mr. Sondheim, including INTO THE WOODS.
INTO THE WOODS weaves together two of the most important things in musical theatre: a wonderful story and beautiful music that relates the story to the actor and audience alike. Bernadette Peters is wonderful in this production as the Witch. No other actress could capture the wickedness of the witch in the first act, but also the vulnerability that she feels after she realizes that she's all alone in the world after Rapunzel leaves. Even though this recording does not include the charming "Our Little World" (which was written for the show after this recording), it is still a wonderful showcase of Mr. Sondheim's masterful work. I recommend it for anyone who is a fan of musical theatre and wants to explore their inner child.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Ms. Peters at her best!, May 5 2004
By A Customer
This review is from: Into the Woods (Audio CD)
My children and I are such a fan of musicals as a genre but, "Into the Woods" has become hands-down a family favorite. Ms. Peters is outstanding as usual, but this is truly her best performance ever. This particular style displays her campy demeanor to its best while at the same time drawing from a poignant place within her soul in "Children Will Listen."
It's truly a show the whole family can enjoy. Children will enjoy the fairy tales woven throughout while adults are able to appreciate the nuances of humor which are abundant. It is definately a new twist to the fairy tales of old.
Joanna Gleason shines just as bright as Ms. Peters with her portrayal of the Baker's wife. Kim Crosby is wonderful as Cinderella. The rest of the cast gave stellar performances. The portrayal of Rapunzel was not quite in the same class as the rest of the cast, but was still good.
There are so many good moments within this cd: "Agony," "It Takes Two," "Moments in the Wood" and my personal favorite "Last Midnight."
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5.0 out of 5 stars Perfect cast in a near-perfect show, Jan. 30 2004
This review is from: Into the Woods (Audio CD)
Another splendid original cast recording from RCA Victor. This was one of their early digital recordings and the sound on the CD could not be bettered. As a bonus, a few short sections of the score that were cut from the show in previews have been restored for the recording.
The whole cast here is as perfect as one could wish for. Joanna Gleason won the Tony for Best Actress, deservedly so. No one has ever sung "Moments in the Woods" as well. Bernadette is wonderful as the Witch...the only recorded Witch to show all the character's colors! Kim Crosby is a fine Cinderella navigating her way through the thicket of lyrics in "On the Steps of the Palace."
Sondheim's lyrics are both playful and thoughtful. (A personal favorite quote: "Oh if life were only moments/Even Now and Then a bad one/But if life were only moments/Then you'd never know you'd had one!") As always much more to think about than your average musical...and therefore the disc stands up to repeated listenings.
The music too, is sometimes simple and lovely ("Children will Listen"; "No One is alone"); sometimes richly dramatic ("Last Midnight", "Lament") and occasionally too clever for its own good ("I know Things Now", "It Takes Two") but always in perfect keeping with the characters and the story. There is a good reason why this score won the 1988 Tony award over Lloyd Webber's PHANTOM OF THE OPERA!
PHANTOM has some lovely melodies, but many dull and boring passages, and the lyrics might as well have came out of an aeresol can! A good Broadway score combines music and lyrics effectively to tell a story ... and that is what the score of INTO THE WOODS does.
There is a video available on VHS and DVD that preserves the original cast in an enjoyable, though somewhat over-the-top performance. The video was taped in the theatre near the end of the show's two year run, while this original cast album was made just 4 days after the show's triumphant premiere. Enjoy both!
Avoid the awful London cast...the cover art is the best thing about that recording. The 2002 revival cast was enjoyable on stage, but the recording fails to capture the fun. Why settle for second best? Stick with the perfect original cast!
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5.0 out of 5 stars "I'm not good, I'm not nice, I'm just right." --The Witch--, Aug. 21 2003
By 
Portia (United States) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Into the Woods (Audio CD)
What am I right about? Well, how fabulous INTO THE WOODS is, for one thing. I adore INTO THE WOODS. I'll just be honest here on this one. I don't really have anything critcal to say about it. I fell in love with the score the moment I heard it for the first time.
This is one of Sondheim's most accessable musicals: not as harmonically challenging as SUNDAY IN THE PARK... or as attention-to-detail-demanding as the lyrics in A LITTLE NIGHT MUSIC. The music is gloriously lush and memorable, these are Sondhiem's most hummable tunes. The plot and characters are funny and endearing.
Basically, this is a massive fairy-tale-for-grown-ups: all your favorite fairy tale characters spend Act I making wishes, getting "through the woods", and basically following the fairly familiar plots your remember from your childhood. Act II is darker as we find out what happens AFTER ever after! Cinderella realizes that maybe life with a prince wasn't what she was wising for after all, Jack (of beanstalk fame) gets a little greedy, Little Red Riding Hood's mom dies and Prince Charming gets a little fickle.
I can't tell you how much this show will win its way into your heart. Its message, which it delivers in the fable-like way of all fairy stories, brings these imaginary characters troubles surprisingly close to home. You will see how wittily Lapine and Sondheim have reminded us to be "careful the wish you make...the spell you cast."
Anyway, this is truly the only version of this show you'll ever want: they got it right the first time, people! First of all, you have the truly showstopping performance of Joanna Gleason as the Baker's Wife and the wonderful Bernadette Peters as the Witch! What more do you want? The whole cast is perfect... Particularly memorable are the Princes and Little Red.
The whole score is nicely organized on one CD (not the spoken dialogue, just the sung bits...which is most of the show anyway). Also included is what is misleadingly called the full libretto, although NONE of the spoken dialogue is included. You can follow along perfectly with the CD however. Some nice photos are included too. For the true entire experience of this original cast's amazing production you should get the video or DVD... the show was filmed for TV! It's wonderfully filmed and if you aren't a DVD fantic, save your money and go VHS; there are NO extras on the DVD at all.
"I wish!"
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5.0 out of 5 stars Sondheim and Peters Soar, June 4 2003
By A Customer
This review is from: Into the Woods (Audio CD)
The original "Into the Woods" was, is and always will be not just one of Stephen Sondheim's best works, but one of the most memorable Broadway musicals of the past fifty years...and that's saying something. The very idea of fairy tale characters getting lost in their own stories and having to work together to find their way out is quite clever. How they do this is strikingly executed by a brilliant cast performing Sondheim's lush score. "Into the Woods", "Ever After" and "So Happy" are distinct ensemble pieces that wrap around the story to guide you along the way. That leaves plenty of room for the character songs, many of which constitute Sondheim at his best. Example, "Giants in the Sky", Jack's reverie upon his return from the beanstalk, is both euphoric and ominous, a harbinger of things to come. "Stay With Me" is the witch's plea to Rapunzel, and its theme of longing is achingly etched by Bernadette Peters. In fact, Peters is in fine form throughout this CD, and her bewildered, flawed witch becomes less sinister and more likeably human as the story progresses. Though some have called this character poorly developed, she actually anchors the show and is the voice of truth throughout. Only an artist of Peters' stature could pull this off, and she displays all of the talents that have made her the preeminent Broadway musical actress of the past 25 years. She proves here that she is easily in the same league as Merman, Martin, Verdon and Lansbury...heady comapny indeed. The rest of the cast is equally memorable for the most part, though Joanna Gleason (her Tony winning performance) is sometimes a bit too obvious in telegraphing her effects. Still, she and Chip Zien make a memorable "Baker and His Wife" and they provide some of the most fertile comedic moments in the show (some of it, admittedly, lost on the cast recording). Ultimately, "Into the Woods" fulfills in both enchanting and moving the listener with its wistful message that "Children Will Listen" (so be careful what you say) but that, in an unpredictable world, "No One is Alone". Lovely.
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3.0 out of 5 stars Three-and-a-half stars ... For Sondheim, only fair, March 11 2003
This review is from: Into the Woods (Audio CD)
Into The Woods is a fine, entertaining show, but I have a feeling after Sondheim has been gone for 100 years this will not be considered one of his classics. Largely that's because he has set the bar so high for himself, but also because the second act is, let's admit it, just flat.
The show came out in 1987, at height of the Ronald Reagan "feel good about everything" era, and I can't help but think that its dim view of "middle class morality" is largely influenced by these times. For traditional fairy tales, they sure have a very contemporary feel, in other words. The motives of the characters are blatantly selfish and usually materialistic, even while they rationalize their actions to have a higher purpose. A lot like the 80s...and today for that matter.
But while the first act is largely brilliant, in the second I get the feeling both Sondheim and Lapine didn't know where to go. There are several terrific numbers, but the intricate plot unravels and slows to a crawl, with an ending that's surprisingly soppy and sentimental for Sondheim.
The music is not top-drawer Sondheim. It ranges from very good ("Giants In The Sky," "On The Steps Of The Palace," "No More") to fair ("Last Midnight," "Your Fault") to less-than-inspired ("I Know Things Now," "No One Is Alone"). Unfortunately, the not-as-great songs tend to come more towards the end, which adds to the feeling that the musical runs out of steam somewhere in Act II. The casting is mostly good, though Chip Zien is whiny and grating. (Yes, I know he's supposed to be, but he does it all too well.) Finally, something rings false about the ending. After setting these people up as largely self-interested and shallow, it's hard to have feelings for them at the end, and I must confess I feel a lot of sympathy for the giant! (Well, both giants.) I find the book morally-muddied, and am not sure in the end what Sondheim and Lapine are trying to say with their resolution. Yes, I agree you should teach your children well, to borrow another lyric, but the people in this show never seem to really change. Or I'm not convinced, anyway.
Still, most Broadway musicals don't even tackle issues this deeply, so there's more food for thought here than in most shows of this type. Still, I feel, especially in act two, they could have done a better job.
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5.0 out of 5 stars I wish..., Dec 30 2002
This review is from: Into the Woods (Audio CD)
Into the Woods is a musical composed of every story you once heard as a child. Featuring Little Red Riding Hood, Jack (from that Beanstalk), and Cinderella - plus many more - it becomes a hugely intertwined story, beginning with a wish and ending in exploration of the woods, as well as the heart and mind. A large cast adds to the element of surprise and revelation of consequence throughout.
In Act I, we find the characters desperately searching for their desires. They begin on their own, but learn that the best way to get anything is through working together. Including songs like "I know things now", "There are Giants in the Sky" and "It Takes Two" we witness the emotional development each to the characters makes. Key company numbers provide a bridge for the audience, and simply add to the all around vastness of the show itself. The First Act ends in the typical fairytale way (ever after)
Act II is slightly darker than it's predessor. Now the characters face the consequences that come with their selfinvested actions of before. But what happens, you'll have to listen to find out.
The music is witty and fast paced. It is easy enough to drop into, with only 2 slightly dull moments in the score - "agony," and of course, the "reprise." Also, with torch ballads "No one is alone," "Children will Listen" and "No More," the show was bound to be a hit. My one recommendation: The first time you listen to it, get rid of any distractions, close you eyes, and listen from beginning to end. You'll be amazed at what Sondheim is capable of.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Brilliant Score, Perfect Cast-- Magical!!, Sept. 26 2002
By 
LB RJ "lb_rj" (Long Beach CA USA) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Into the Woods (Audio CD)
This post-modern collage of fairy-tale snippets will not be to everyone's liking. Moral ambiguities are not acceptable to so many people who want to be told how to think, what to feel, etc. This show reminds us that our decisions and actions affect others-- we are, indeed, not alone-- for better or worse. Happily, this rather deep message is spun into a darkly merry confection with a superb Stephen Sondheim score. Hummable? With repeated listenings, sure. Beautiful? Absolutely.
The 1987 original cast cannot be improved upon. Bernadette Peters, who had dazzled audiences for years with her erotic take on Sondheim's "Broadway Baby", was the ideal Witch, and her unique singing shines through. Chip Zien and Robert Westenberg are other standouts in a uniformly great cast. Joanna Gleason, however, is the true revelation. The part of the Baker's Wife is rich: steel-willed wife, happy mother, girlish lover; and Gleason nails it wonderfully on stage and in this recording. (Compare it to her unforgettable cameo as Mark Wahlberg's bitter, rage-filled shrew of a mother in "Boogie Nights".) Her singing is quite dazzling, running up and down the scale between contralto and mezzo-soprano effortlessly. She should record more than she does; her warm voice could make for a lovely album of Jerome Kern or even Sondheim ballads. Who knew she was Monty Hall's daughter...?
For those Andrew Lloyd Webber fans who disparage Sondheim, I say: Fine, stay with Sir Andrew. If you like your warmed-over imitation Puccini so much, enjoy it. For those who like their musical theatre with more originality, more bite, and more melody, Sondheim is the true heir to Kern, Gershwin, Rodgers and Porter, and "Into the Woods" true theatrical magic.
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2.0 out of 5 stars The most over rated musical (and composer) of its time, Sept. 10 2002
By 
Cathleen Schultheis (Agoura Hills, CA United States) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Into the Woods (Audio CD)
When this musical hit Broadway in 1988 New York Times theater critic Frank Rich deemed Into the Woods the thematic culmination of Stephen Sondheim's career. Just why this didactic, whiny and uninspired composer has received such unmitigated critical approval is one of the great mysteries of the modern aesthetic world.
Unfashionable as it is to assert this, Mr. Sondheim is a skillfull lyricist and composer by Broadway standards but his musicals cannot seriously be compared in their moral significance and dramatic power to the Andrew Lloyd Webber musicals of the late 1980s and early 1990s. Like Mr. Sondheim, around the mid-1980s Lloyd Webber experienced an existential and metaphysical darkening, a dramatic shift in sensibility. Sondheim's began with Sunday in the Park with George, Lloyd Webber's with Requiem. Lloyd Webber's "Music of the Night" forged a melodic fusion of eroticism and piety that, bolstered only by the strength of an ivory mask, concealed the face no one could ever love. Of all the musicals of the 80s and 90s none has been loved more than Lloyd Webber's The Phantom of the Opera. Bolstered by strongly atmospheric music (every bit as sophisticated and Sondheim's that binds the audience irrevocably to the musical's hero and a textured and graceful dramatic argument--a lesson in the decimating consequences of defaulted familial responsibilities and social ostracism--Phantom will undoubtedly remain in the hearts of millions of people for hundreds of years to come.
Like Sondheim's 1962 A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum, Into the Woods is replete with characters darting in and out of the action, weaving their way through the drama's melodies, in search of tangential and morally inconsequential goals. One of the story's many subplots finds two Princes in search of loveless gratification. Their song "Agony," reprised in the second act, is always a show-stopper. The development of these two characters is an interesting case study in Mr. Sondheim's aesthetic. The uninhibited sexual desires of Cinderella's Prince lead him to practically murder the Baker's Wife. This is not his fault, of course, Mr. Sondheim argues, he's a prisoner of the morally questionable fairy-tale universe that created him. But why does he deliver this final, unrepentant line to his Cinderella after she accuses him of adultery: "I was raised to be charming, not sincere. I didn't ask to be born king, and I'm not perfect. I'm only human." This meaningless circumlocution conceals whatever structural ironies the Prince's dramatic arc contains. What we really have is an unrepentant murderer who excuses his behavior through a reference to his flawed nature, much like George justifying his coldness and cruelty to the woman who loves him on account of his obsession with creating art. Like most Sondheim musicals, from Forum to Sunday in the Park with George, Woods attempts to mitigate such glaring vulgarities by undercutting its characters with ironic diction and music that distances you, rather than draws you into, the action. As evidenced by the experimental Sunday in the Park with George, Mr. Sondheim believes it given to him to transport the modern musical into the modernist and postmodernist realms that haunt 20th century art. Mr. Sondheim simply does not have the skill to accomplish this task. Woods' score fails to transport us into the strange and haunted state in which the line between perception and objectivity blurs that we associate with Eliot or Pinter. Mr. Sondheim's musicals have been derided as "intellectal" and lacking in emotional depth by some critics. Truth be told, for the most part his musicals suffer as much from a paucity of intellect as they do from a lack of melodic convincingness. Into the Woods' lyrics are occassionally clever but for the most part they're didactic and tiresome. Consider Little Red Riding Hood: "And I know things now, many magical things, that I never knew before...Nice is different than good." The banality of Mr. Sondheim's lyrics is matched by the shallowness of his score and the dramatic incompetence of Mr. Lapine's book. The score has some occassional inspired moments, such as the thunderous, accelerating surge of counterpoint that propels the Act One finale's "though it's fearful" section into the harmonically assured title theme: "Into the Woods it's time to go..."
In Act Two, Into the Woods also contains a number of heartfelt melodies that attempt to give voice to the agony of characters whose lives lack the sustaining hand of a benevolent God and who instead flounder about in a nightmarish, fragmented universe where people are the victims of natural forces beyond their control. "No One is Alone" and "No More" are, like many of Sondheim's best, about disillusionment and despair, and culminate in the characters' reluctant acceptance of the necessity of mediocre, flawed, tenuous and aggravating relationships. None of these rival the ravishing lullabies and devestating operatics of the period's most beloved musical, The Phantom of the Opera.
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5.0 out of 5 stars One of the Greatest of all Modern Musicals, July 11 2002
By A Customer
This review is from: Into the Woods (Audio CD)
I recently saw a local high school production of INTO THE WOODS, and it was far from impressive. However, despite the fact that the production itself was lackluster, I immediately became aware of how powerful the musical itself really was. That just goes to show how fascinating INTO THE WOODS is--I immediately had to buy the soundtrack because I couldn't get the songs out of my head.
The show features a variety of familiar characters from fairy tales (Little Red Riding Hood, Cinderella, Jack from "Jack and the Beanstalk") and throws them together as they wander through a dark, twisted forest, crossing paths as each tries desperately to get what he or she wishes for. At the end of Act 1, everyone has gotten his or her wish and assumes that they will live happily ever after...but in Act 2, they find that their happiness is fleeting and their dreams begin collapsing around them.
This is a musical that truly plays up all of the fear, complexities, and innuendoes of classic fairy tales. Sondheim gives us the real, unexpurgated versions of the stories we know from childhood, reminding us of their startling violence and sexual themes. The musical deals with adultery, revenge, and sexual awakening. This is very much a DARK show, and while it does have plenty of humor, that's dark, too.
The music itself is simply sublime, the lyrics simple yet put together to create amazingly complex harmonies and counterpoints. The title number is merry yet slightly menacing. "Agony," sung by two lustful princes, is a haunting duet. "Last Midnight" provides Bernadette Peters with her moment to shine as the Witch, who goes from gruesome to glamorous (her other memorable moment, however, is her very clever "rap" number early in the show). The baker's wife, played by Joanna Gleason, performs an emotional "Moments in the Woods," in which she contemplates a spur-of-the-moment affair. And the finale, which consists of the beautiful "Children will Listen" followed by a reprise of the title song, is the perfect ending to the show.
This recording is, quite simply, the best available. Every member of the cast is strong and there isn't a single thing that can be complained about.
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