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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Very good
The packaging is excellent. The price was very affordable. There is a whole DVD of additional features, which is better that having them scattered throughout the whole set. About the episodes, I think that the resolution was a bit low and the images weren't too sharp. But the historical and investigative aspects of the story soon will cover any glitch or complain that you...
Published on June 11 2011 by Phollox

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21 of 29 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars As a film: rather good - as a semi-documentary: poor
...
Many reviewer have rightfully praised some of the good value of this TV miniseries (even though, I would not rate this film so high, because it also comprises truly inferior sequences, such the Apollo-13 part - which, in the ligh of the Apolo 13 movie, could have been neither avoided nor successfully included - or the annoying Apollo-7 [or the majority of the...
Published on July 19 2003


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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Very good, June 11 2011
This review is from: From the Earth to the Moon: Signature Edition (Bilingual) (DVD)
The packaging is excellent. The price was very affordable. There is a whole DVD of additional features, which is better that having them scattered throughout the whole set. About the episodes, I think that the resolution was a bit low and the images weren't too sharp. But the historical and investigative aspects of the story soon will cover any glitch or complain that you can have with the video. If you are a big fan of HD sharp images, probably this is not for you
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11 of 13 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars It was 35 Years Ago Today, July 19 2004
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HBO's "From the Earth to the Moon" (E2M) is everything a good docu-drama mini-series should be. Tom Hanks has brought to life the true story of man's greatest adventure to "land a man on the Moon and return him safely to Earth". For those of us who were alive, E2M allows us to relive those incredible days. And for those who were born afterwards, it gives them a chance to understand exactly what it was they missed. If you have even the slightest interest in the space program, obtaining a copy of this DVD set is a must.
Coincidently, Apollo 11 landed exactly 35 years ago today. I was 13 years old at the time and living in Nova Scotia, Canada. The "Eagle" touched down at 5:17 pm, much to the consternation of my mother who was busy trying to prepare supper. Just like Tom Hanks would later relate, I had my models of the Command Service Module, Lunar Module and Saturn V rocket close at hand while I had claimed the living room armchair for the occasion. My family gathered around our old B&W television which was tuned to the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation (CBC), one of only two stations which were available to us back then. Much of the CBC's coverage consisted of a feed from CBS, so we got to watch Walter Cronkite's famous "Oh Boy!" commentary. My prized 3" reel-to-reel tape recorder (you could get all of 1 hour on a single reel) was busy taping a local radio station carrying NBC's coverage with Jay Barbree.
The entire family congregated again a few hours later for the moonwalk, just before midnight, and watched Neil & Buzz's first steps. I stayed up for the entire 30 hour televised stretch, from lunar landing to liftoff, stealing a moment every now and then to go outside and gaze up in wonder at the moon, filled with awe that two human beings were actually there, living and working on its surface. In this day of CNN and other all-news networks, it should be remembered that the coverage of this event was in itself history in-the-making - TV's longest continuous coverage of a planned event.
My interest in space began with the flight of Apollo 8. When I heard that this was the first manned launch of the world's biggest rocket, the Saturn V, I was sure that one of its million parts would go wrong with disastrous results. Thank God it didn't. I watched and I was forever hooked. A real space junkie, religiously watching each mission after that, coaxing my Mom to let me stay home from school (recurrent cases of "moon sickness", no doubt), clipping out every newspaper, Life, Time or Newsweek article I could find (now faded yellow with age) and trying to tape as much of the audio coverage as I could (few private individuals could afford a video recorder back then). By Apollo 14, I had earned enough money working at a grocery store to buy a 4-track 7" reel-to-reel recorder (which allowed one to put up to 12 hours on a single tape!) and had built a 15" Heathkit color TV. For Apollo 16, I had added a new-generation "cassette" recorder to my arsenal (don't forget that the venerable 8-track was still popular at the time). And, of course, I had acquired a VCR by the time the first Space Shuttle flew in 1981. It has always annoyed me that the more recording resources I could afford, the less TV & radio coverage there was available to tape.
But the effect of the Apollo program on me was profound. Because of it, I entered into a career in radio astronomy, enjoying the technical challenge of building instruments to investigate deep space from the Earth, perhaps recognizing the likelihood that I would never have to opportunity to leave its surface (although I did make the first cut for the Canadian Astronaut Program nearly 20 years ago). In tribute to Project Apollo, we named our son (now 16) after astronaut David Scott who commanded Apollo 15, my favorite of all the lunar flights.
In many ways, I feel sorry for the children of today - they will never experience the monumental awe and global celebration that we were privileged to witness back in 1969. Strange, isn't it, that although Apollo - the pinnacle of mankind's technical achievement - which occurred only 35 years ago is now looked on as though it was something out of our deep past rather than a part of our future. It's almost treated like it was a chapter out of ancient history, similar to other great accomplishments like the building of the Pyramids or the Great Wall. Although it might not seem so today, 500 years from now the moon landings will undoubtedly be remembered as the most significant event to have occurred in the 20th century.
It's hard to choose my favorite E2M episode since they were all so good. As an engineer, "Spider" resonated well with me, portraying the passion and dedication which many of us put into our work, albeit for projects with a much lower profile. "That's All There Is" brought back fond memories of the Apollo 12 mission. I distinctly remember there was talk at the time that astronauts Conrad and Bean may have been on an accidental oxygen high. It's good to know that there effervescent behavior on the surface was just a manifestation of their normal high spirits and comradery. I was delighted at how "Galileo Was Right" was able to present the training of the astronauts to be field-geologists in such an entertaining and informative manner. And finally, the bittersweet "Le Voyage Dans La Lune" brought a tear to my eye, just as happened back in 1972 when I watched Apollo 17 and the last lunar module lift-off from the moon. It's even sadder still, that we have not returned, nor will we for perhaps another 20 years.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars What a compelling series....., July 6 2013
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This review is from: From the Earth to the Moon: Signature Edition (Bilingual) (DVD)
I bought this set without having seen it when it originally aired. Not my usual practice but it was on sale and I decided to take a chance. I sat down late one night just to check out the start of the first episode to get some idea of what it was like. Well.....about six episodes later, when I couldn't keep my eyes open any more, I finally forced myself to stop watching and go to bed. I literally could not tear myself away. The quality of this production is unbelievable! Enormous efforts have made to reproduce the facts and events exactly as they happened. Each episode is presented differently, from various points of view, as the story of the Apollo space program unfolds. Each chapter tells more of the story but each one is unique....one episode will be told from the astronauts' point of view, another from their wives' perspective, even one where we are with the media on the outside trying to get the inside scoop on the terrifying events surrounding the ill-fated mission of Apollo 13. Having grown up in the fifties and sixties I remember the Apollo missions and the excitement they generated and it brought these events vividly to life for me and awoke many precious memories. Obviously this whole production was a labour of love from start to finish and I am grateful beyond words to everyone who was involved in this production.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars One of the best, June 26 2012
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This is one of HBO's finest productions. Tom Hanks et all did a superb job of bringing the moon race to life. Each episode is done differently so there is no set formula. The casting was superb and the production fantastic. I didn't partcularily like the episode about Apollo 13 but the rest were fantastic! This is one very worthwhile purchase.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Must Have, Jan. 15 2014
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This review is from: From the Earth to the Moon: Signature Edition (Bilingual) (DVD)
A MUST HAVE for any fan of historical documentary. Fantastically produced and written. Packaging is great, loved the signature edition ( shown ).
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5.0 out of 5 stars Very enjoyable family viewing, Dec 21 2013
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I really enjoyed this set and so did my family. At the end of each episode I just had to watch the next one.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Very good, June 17 2013
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Terry Clark (Augusta, Georgia United States) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: From the Earth to the Moon: Signature Edition (Bilingual) (DVD)
The episodes were good. The bonus disc could have been a bit more in depth I feel but thats just my opinion. Overall quite satisfied with the product
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5.0 out of 5 stars De la terre à la lune, May 7 2012
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J'ai bien aimé ce vidéo je le recommande fortement. Ce document est très bien fait.
12 émissions d'une heure chacune.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars You want space history, you get it here., Feb. 9 2004
By A Customer
I originally saw this when HBO aired it in late April to early May of 1998. I wasn't even born when these events actually happened, so to be able to see the accomplishments of the NASA space program is wonderful, not only for myself, but for the people who did see it when it happened. This documentary covers Alan Shepards' flight of Mercury 7, President Kennedys' speech that got the space program off the ground, up through Apollo 17 - sadly, Americas' last steps on the moon.
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21 of 29 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars As a film: rather good - as a semi-documentary: poor, July 19 2003
By A Customer
...
Many reviewer have rightfully praised some of the good value of this TV miniseries (even though, I would not rate this film so high, because it also comprises truly inferior sequences, such the Apollo-13 part - which, in the ligh of the Apolo 13 movie, could have been neither avoided nor successfully included - or the annoying Apollo-7 [or the majority of the Apollo-8] parts). However, what most, if not all, of those reviewers miss is to compare this film to reality. And that is the point where this semi-documentary fails.
My biggest concern is that this film is being just too patriotic on the account of treating people, who were responsible for putting Americans on the Moon in the first place, with dignity and fairness. First of all, where is the sole person who made J.F. Kenendy's dream come true - German chief rocket designer, Dr. Wernher von Braun - in the film? He designed the mighty Saturn 5 rocket (and most of its predecessors), which was the very point the USA could beat the Soviets (the Russians' Moon boosters kept blowing up, while the Saturn rockets worked flawlessly). Yet Dr. Braun appears in the 10-hour film for literally a few seconds - and only for mocking on him. It is shameless. Where is the 110-meter tall Saturn booster, the main attraction of the Kennedy's Space Centre Visitor Complex, the biggest and best rocket ever designed and built in the world, mentioned in this 12-part series? Nowhere ... while over an hour is dedicated to the building of the Lunar Module, which would have stayed on ground forewer, had NASA not had the Saturn rockets.
By the way, LEM was designed under the leadership of Canadian engineers (who had been involved with Canada's Avro Arrow superplane project), and even the legs of the descent module were also manufactured in Canada. Many Canadian, British and German engineers were involved with the NASA project - and even Hungarians [one of them designed the Lunar Rover] -, yet no other nation than American is mentioned in this 600-minute series. With all due respect, bored housewives contributed to the program a lot less than those people (first and foremost Dr. von Braun) -, yet the film erects a statue for them (which alone would be fine and righful), but completely forgetting about those "foreign" scientists and engineers, without whom NASA would have never been successful. (Just see, please, how NASA has been struggling ever since those "foreigners" had left out of the picture.)
Unlike - the much better, elbeit also inaccurate - 'The Right Stuff', this miniseries is virtually ignors the Soviets as well, who were the pioneers in space exploration, and Americans had followed their footsteps up until before landing Americans on the Moon. The space race was [righfully, I admit full-heartedly] won by the Americans - but the film ignores the fact that by not much. The first human-made device landing on the Moon was the Russian Lunik-9, the first earthly creatures orbiting the Moon were Russian turtles, and the first colour photograph showing earth-rise seen from the vicinity of the Moon was taken by a Soviet Zond [the unmanned Russian Lunar spacecraft]. Had the Americans finished the LM in time - and, as a result, had they skipped the Apollo-8 moon-orbit flight in order to take the LEM to Earth orbit right away - the Soviets might have beaten the USA by the first manned lunar orbit... But the Soviets were just playing safe to put animals aboard their lunar spaceship first, which resulted the loss of the race to the Moon. (On the other hand, NASA took a huge risk with sending a crew aboard Apollo-8 to the Moon; Had the O2 tank exploded in the Apollo-8's Service Module and not in the Apollo-13's [the faulty design had already been there], there would have been no way of saving those three astronauts, considering the absence of the Lunar Module that would serve as a lifeboat.) NASA gambled - and won ... but they do not always win {see the bad fate of Challenger and, most recently, Columbia... By the way, the Soviets tested their shuttle, Buran, unmanned + a Soyuz spacecraft - originally designed for taking cosmonauts to the Moon - could have been used as a lifeboat, had the Buran's [presumably 2- or 3-member] crew {who never flew in the reality} been in danger during subsequent flights. Compared this cautious approach to the American Space Shuttle program, please...})
I take my hat off, however, before Tom Hanks, who, at the beginning of one of the episodes, is trying to make a balance by stating: "Without Tsiolkovsky, Koroljev and von Braun <two Russian and a German rocket scientists> America could have never gone to the Moon." It is very true - but where are those genetlemen in this long and detailed TV miniseries...?
P.s.: My concern is not what is in this 12-part TV series [becasue there is a lot, indeed] - but rather what is missing ... and due to the neglect of those important factors described above, I just can not enjoy this film...
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