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4.5 out of 5 stars
In Search Of The Lost Chord
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on February 12, 2001
They had done the symphony thing and pulled it off with flying colors. But this follow-up was pure, 100% Moody Blues. Of the 32 (!) different instruments used on this album, every one of them was played by one of the five band members. With this and other albums, they earned the nickname of "the world's smallest symphony orchestra."
This album is a journey, from beginning to end, in search of the chord and many other things. There is a heavy Eastern Philosophical influence, especially on the Mike Pinder contributions (Best Way to Travel, Om.) The songs flow into each other beautifully, making it sound like one continuous song. In every song, the singer yearns for something which that can never be defined in words. Mike Pinder's searing mellotron and Ray Thomas's soaring flute are the definitive sounds of the album.
Of course, this is the album that yielded two of the Moodies greatest and most enduring concert pieces, the rollicking "Ride My See-saw" and psychadelic "Legend of a Mind." Another standout is "The Actor," A Justin Hayward ballad so haunting it is in the same league as "Nights in White Satin." Then there's the lovely "Voices in the Sky," and John Lodge's epic, expermental "House of Four Doors," which samples musical styles throughout history.
This album is absolutely loaded with beautiful, experimental music. Why this band is so often not considered a part of the Prog Rock genre I'll never know.
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on January 9, 2001
I loved this album when I first got it as a Christmas present (I must have been 12 or 13). And I love it today. I haven't heard the "re-mastered CD" so I can't comment on that - I still listen to my scratched up LP. This, along with "To Our Children's Children's Children", are in my opinion the Moody Blues best. Lots of reviewers here are putting heavy emphasis on the "Eastern" flavor of this album. To me, this sort of misses the point. True enough, the Eastern theme may be ovbious on the surface, but the music acts as a springboard which transcends categorization, religious or otherwise. And isn't that the point of music? It's the Moody Blues, first and foremost, and that's what makes the album so wonderful.
I agree wholeheartedly with reviewers who expressed the idea of the endless emotional journeys that this album will take you on. And people tend to forget, the Moody Blues can rock! But rather than overwhelm you with it, they tease you, such as the ending to "Dr. Livingstone". Chunky, syncopated layers of acoustic guitar, bass, drums and vocals still send chills up my spine 30 years later. "Ride My See-Saw", "Legend of a Mind", and "The Best Way To Travel" are in my opinion the best cuts.
Simply put, this album is a treasure.
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on August 22, 2000
After listening to DAYS OF FUTURE PASSED, I got so impressed with Moody Blues music that I had an enormous interest in listening their second album. Normally many groups, after a great and succesful first album -in this case it was the first with Justin & John-, they try continue to follow the style they began and repeat themselves. But, in this album, we see it didn't happen. This album IN SEARCH OF THE LOST CHORD was as great and extraordinary as their predecesor. It captured the Eastern sounds and it showed how a band must experiment with the music and their sounds without being something extremely complicated. Sincerely when I heard first time this album, I was in ectasy. I couldn't believe such a peaceful and wonderful music I was discovering, it was like a hidden treasure for me. From the beginning with the funny laugh of Graeme till the last song, the relaxed tarck called Om, we feel like we were travelling to Eastern places. It really continue with the conceptual albums, and the idea for House Of Four Doors -which included Part 1, Legend Of A Mind & Part. 2- is simply brilliant. My fave tracks here are: Never Comes The Day, House Of Four Doors, Voices In The Sky and Legend Of A Mind. This album showed why the Moody Blues have been considered as one of the best Classic Rock bands in the world, and their first 7 albums are considered as real gems of music.
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on August 19, 2000
The opening cut of this first of several concept albums released by the Moody Blues in rapid fire succession tells it all, a provocative, thoughtful, and intellectually fascinating exploration of altered states of consciousness, and a particular focus on the eastern idea of being. This exploration is a quite self-conscious attempt to use the experimental fusion between mainstream rock music and eastern forms started by the Beatles, and no one carried off the exploration with more panache and style than the Moody Blues, who, to their great distress, quickly became a kind of cult force in popular culture, making them pop icons overnight.
This is an intriguing album, and a valuable introduction for the uninitiated to the wild range of talents and interests of the various members of the band, and is a showcase for their musical virtuosity. From the opening mysterious number introducing the concept to the quick transition to "Ride My Seesaw", this is a fast-paced tour of the wide range of the field of psychedelic exploration. ""Legend Of A Mind" is an ironic look at Timothy Leary and his public advocacy of LSD, laughing at the idea while at the same time exploring it in earnest (He'll take you on a trip across the bay.... and bring you back the same day...). "House of Four Doors" is an introduction to "Zen' proper, and to the uniquely eastern ideas of altered states of consciousness and being. "Legend Of A Mind" is a further exposition of Leary and the popular search for consciousness.
The rest of the album focuses increasingly on aspects of the eastern way of perceiving and interpreting reality, and they conduct this exploration within the margins of popular music quite provocatively and very entertainingly. This part of the album is my favorite, especially the evocative "Voices In The Sky", although I also really like "Visions of Paradise", "Om", and "The Word" as well. This is classic Moody Blues material, and they mine this genre in a way uniquely their own. I would start with this album, and work my way deliciously through "On The Threshold Of A Dream", "To Our Childrens' Childrens' Children", and finally to "A Question Of Balance", which comprises the real close of this phase of their concept album series. All of them are thoughtful, artistically well expressed, and a timeless celebration of what it means to be human. I highly recommend all their albums. Enjoy!
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on June 27, 1999
This is the one album that critics say has dated, I suppose because of the use of sitar and references to Timothy Leary, etc. I find that vision short sighted. This is where the Moodies really experimented with instrumentation, sitars, flutes, unusual combinations of music and lyrics. And there are some superbly beautiful moments-such as "Voices In The Sky," which in my view captures a lot of the best of Justin's lyrical and melodic gifts. "Om" is said to be dated, but I find the sitar, flute, mellotron combination mesmerizing, and the final vocal chorus takes me to another planet. "House of Four Doors" is a rather sophisticated song in terms of lyrics and presentation with the "door sound" and the classically inspired instrumentation. Need I go on? The Eastern Philosophy stuff is there to be sure, but the music holds its own so well, and who is to say that Eastern philosophy is "dated?" My personal favorite of all the Moodies core seven albums is "To Our Children's Children's Children," but I think one could certainly make the argument that this is their best.
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on June 27, 2002
This album is so undescribable. See, it came right after Days of Future Passed (which was also excellent), and I believe the band may have been a bit more comfortable because now they had a record deal and everything. Justin's voice seems to have matured in some way- yet he sounds the same. I say this because if there was a song that ever made me cry it would be The Actor. By far the greatest song on the album (but the whole thing is fantastic). The sound of Justin's voice is so mysterious. He sounds so sad, and then the words are so emotional. I die when Justin sings- The sound I've heard in you hello-oh darling, you're almost part of me, oh darling, you're all I'll ever see.
Yeah! So buy the CD, you'll have no regrets. Moodies albums are the only ones I can listen to from beginning to end, usually I find myself skipping around on the CD's of other artist's- not so here. Enjoy. Oh and I would have given it all of the stars in the universe, but that's just not physically possible.
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I don't know how many hours I have spent immersed in this CD. It grabs me and takes me on a journey of Imagination (that's right, with a capital I), and no matter how many times I listen to it, I keep finding new shores to visit. The songs are simple and complex at the same time, and I must admit even simplistic at some level, BUT THEY WORK! Nobody will ever claim that Justin Hayward has a great singing voice or that he is a great poet, in fact, when you look at the lyrics by themselves they are really insipid. What happens when they are put into the context of the music is awesome, though. Those lyrics are transformed into yearnings that can only be answered by letting your soul make a journey into the unknown. The music is filled with layers of shadow, and open spaces where every note promises new horizons, and delivers, often vistas you didn't expect. In case you hadn't figured it out, I like this CD.
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on March 7, 2002
IN 1977, THIS WAS THE VERY FIRST ALBUM (LONG PLAY RECORD) I HEARD OF THE MOODY BLUES. I RECOGNISED THE SOUND OF 'NIGHTS IN WHITE SATIN', BUT DID NOT HAD AN IDEA WHO IT WAS. THE MOODY BLUES RELEASED THIS ALBUM IN 1967 TO PROVE THAT THEY ACTUALLY COULD PLAY MUSIC. AT THEIR FIRST ALBUM (DAYS OF FUTURE PASSED) A COMPLETE ORCHESTRA PLAYED WITH THE BAND. AT 'IN SEARCH...' THE BAND SHOWED THAT THEY WHERE A SYMPHONIC ORCHESTRA THEMSELVES. THE RESULT WAS AN ALBUM WITH UNFORGETTABLE SOUND. THEY PLAYED WITH THE VERY FIRST ANALOG SYNTHESIZER: THE MELLOTRON, BASED ON RECORDED TAPES.
THE MOODY BLUUES PROVED TO BE AN EXAMPLE FOR MANY OTHERS TO COME. NOWADAYS, IN 2002 THE BAND STARTS A NEW WORLDTOUR (USA, CANADA, EUROPE) ON EACH SHOW WILL BE PLAYED "LEGEND OF A MIND" and 'RIDE MY SEE SAW'.
I AM LOOKING FOR THE NEW STUDIO ALBUM TO BE RELEASED THIS AUTUMN. HOPE TO SEE YOU THERE AGAIN!
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on February 9, 2003
This album could be the most exquisite and fantastical album ever written by this band. The entire album flows together as one, making it a journey through exotic soundscapes. From cascading harps, to journeys through the jungle, through mysterious territory, to paradise and on to the meaning within ourselves. A creative earthy experience is in store throuout the album as it flows gently through mystical truth and excursions. Wonderful melodys with acoustic guitars, electric guitars, and eastern insturments (tabla and Sitar), enhance the beauty and create an album completely different than any other they have accomplished. To me this is the best album and always provides a fantastic listening experience.
Ben.
the 15 year old.
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on April 29, 1999
If your looking for an album to take you away from the hustle and bustle of the busy world, than this is the one. This album definitly ranks among one of the best produced by the Moody Blues. This was thier second album but the tightness and confidence of thier sound makes it sound like there 10th! With spoken passeges that really make you wonder about the world of the unknown and relaxing songs about love, paradise and the world around us, you'll forget about all your worries. It opens with thier classic oncore hit "Ride My See-Saw" and ends with "OM" a song with a great sitar jam. Highly recommended among most Moody Blues fans and a great starting album for those who are just discovering thier music.
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