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52 Reviews
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5.0 out of 5 stars The best.
My favourite. Listenable from start to finish. Has some absolutely classic songs. Some musical groups may have
experimented with some substances around this time. Listening to it is a Trip , and a worthwhile voyage.
Highly recommended.
Published 9 days ago by Big Bill

versus
3.0 out of 5 stars Will not play on some CD players
I have never had a CD like this. It will play on only 2 of the 4 CD players that I own. The music is good but my expectations were very high. Maybe that is why I find it is good but not stellar.
Published on Jan. 31 2010 by Jim S


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5.0 out of 5 stars LEGEND OF A BAND IS BORN, March 7 2002
By 
IN 1977, THIS WAS THE VERY FIRST ALBUM (LONG PLAY RECORD) I HEARD OF THE MOODY BLUES. I RECOGNISED THE SOUND OF 'NIGHTS IN WHITE SATIN', BUT DID NOT HAD AN IDEA WHO IT WAS. THE MOODY BLUES RELEASED THIS ALBUM IN 1967 TO PROVE THAT THEY ACTUALLY COULD PLAY MUSIC. AT THEIR FIRST ALBUM (DAYS OF FUTURE PASSED) A COMPLETE ORCHESTRA PLAYED WITH THE BAND. AT 'IN SEARCH...' THE BAND SHOWED THAT THEY WHERE A SYMPHONIC ORCHESTRA THEMSELVES. THE RESULT WAS AN ALBUM WITH UNFORGETTABLE SOUND. THEY PLAYED WITH THE VERY FIRST ANALOG SYNTHESIZER: THE MELLOTRON, BASED ON RECORDED TAPES.
THE MOODY BLUUES PROVED TO BE AN EXAMPLE FOR MANY OTHERS TO COME. NOWADAYS, IN 2002 THE BAND STARTS A NEW WORLDTOUR (USA, CANADA, EUROPE) ON EACH SHOW WILL BE PLAYED "LEGEND OF A MIND" and 'RIDE MY SEE SAW'.
I AM LOOKING FOR THE NEW STUDIO ALBUM TO BE RELEASED THIS AUTUMN. HOPE TO SEE YOU THERE AGAIN!
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5.0 out of 5 stars It's the Music, Stupid!, March 3 2002
"It's the music, Stupid!" That is what I have to say to those who fuss over this as a "concept album". In Search of the Lost Chord is one of the two most consistent and musically cohesive albums the Moody Blues ever did (the other is Children's Children). Except for the first two songs ("Ride My See Saw" and "Dr. Livingstone") it isn't rock music at all. It is simply their own sound, completely original and unique and you can't get it anywhere else. There is one bad song ("House of Four Doors") but everything else is top drawer, even the spacy Best Way to Travel. Indian and western musical influences are blended more successfully here than any other rock or pop band ever achieved, including the Beatles. "Legend of a Mind," Ray Thomas' cheeky English take on American acid-head Timothy Leary is experimental and entirely successful, working toward a thrilling climax propelled by repeated calling of Leary's name and John Lodge's thumping bass. "See-Saw" is solid classic rock. "Voices in the Sky" and "Visions of Paradise" are delightful, but I save my highest praise for "The Actor". It is the quintessential and best Justin Hayward song ever, and that is saying a lot - powerful singing, a beautiful melody, delicately textured instrumental backing of acoustic guitar and flute, gentle drumming by Graeme, and very effective lyrics. It is a song to be listened to with eyes closed. Singers today attempt to convey emotion through pre-programmed vocal acrobatics, but listen to Justin on this song. He just belts it out straight and the passion is right there, it comes right out of him, and it's much better than his earlier and more famous "Nights in White Satin". The Actor is the song on which Justin makes his strongest claim to greatness as a vocalist.
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5.0 out of 5 stars One of the best rock/pop experiments ever made, Jan. 28 2002
This review is from: In Search of Lost Chord (Audio CD)
Being from my favorite group from all time, I can't be objective with this record. But anyway to listen to it is to understand how far they got in making incredible modern music mixed with classic and traditional influences from many places and times in the world and mixing as well a very moving and dinamic, young nature with a vital and deep sense of spirituality.
After the grand experiment with a symphonic orchestra of 'Days of Future Passed' the Moody Blues and the producer Tony Clarke lock themselves in the studio in 1968 to create a magnificent musical expedition across the mind. 'Legend of a Mind' is maybe the highest point flute player Ray Thomas has ever reached as a songwriter. The part with of the flute solo leaves you standing naked in the middle of a field embracing nature with your open arms, and the intense ending leads you through a speed-of-light journey across your dreams and feelings.
'Visions of Paradise' is the song that maybe has put in the highest point the intention George Harrison founded of mixing psychodelic 60's rock with Indian traditional music. The voice harmonies really make you see paradise in front of you as you ever dreamed it was. 'Voices in the Sky' is a splendid, fresh and delicious chant to nature and simple joy. 'Om' is one of the superb tunes full of universal spirituality keyboardist Mike Pinder created, ending the album with perpetual choir voices ascending to the sky.
Every song in this album has a life in its own and is a world in itself, and they're also a standard for all pop/rock music created later. So, it's five starts without a doubt. A masterpiece of symphonic rock.
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5.0 out of 5 stars PURE LISTENING PLEASURE, Oct. 4 2001
By 
Tim Huguet (AMSTERDAM Holland) - See all my reviews
Say what you want about this CD sounding outdated now, the bottom line is that it remains a pure smorgasbord of beautiful sounds and pleasure to the ears!! And let's be honest : it is a happy album...a feel good album, if you will. Nothing like walking through the woods still wet with rain and letting a song like Voices in the Sky drift through your headphones. Or how about Dr. Livingstone, I presume or The Actor....peace of mind prevails after a listen to this gem. You can hear it in Justin Haywards'voice - he has found it, as should we...
Get it ... and enjoy......
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4.0 out of 5 stars After all, any follow-up to DAYS would have been a letdown, Sept. 12 2001
DAYS OF FUTURE PASSED (1967) not only changed the way orchestras were used in pop music, but it gave new life to the Moody Blues' almost-dormant career at the time. With Justin Hayward now the official leader, the Moodies had officially left behind their blues-rock beginnings & pursuing the orchestral-pop concept full time. But while DAYS was a huge surprise, any follow-up to it was bound to pale in comparison, and with IN SEARCH OF THE LOST CHORD, it certainly did. The best way to describe LOST CHORD could be that it is a little too hippie. With meditation & spiritual oneness becoming fashionable, only time would tell when it found its way into pop music. The Beatles had been fierce converts (at first), but the next closest would probably be the Moodies courtesy of the LOST CHORD album. Of course, it didn't start out that way. After the introduction called "Depature", we get into the driving rocker "Ride My Seesaw". We all know a see-saw is something you'd see on the playground, but in England maybe it means something else, but either way the song still rocks to high heaven, proving that the Moodies hadn't totally given up their beat-driven days. "Dr. Livingston, I Presume" is hard to describe really, rather than it's just another odd yet strangely infectious concoction that they created during their orchestral-pop phase. Maybe XTC was born a decade before it actually arrived, thanks to this song. "House Of Four Doors" is where we truly get into the whole mystical theme that runs throughout the album & if you don't quite get what it's all about, you're not alone. Perhaps you had to have been around in the '60s to understand it. "Legend Of A Mind" has a much more recognizable theme, being it a tribute of sorts to Timothy Leary, even with the line "Timothy Leary's dead/No, he's outside looking in". The music is enchanting enough to make one forget about the highly esoteric nature of this & many of the other songs on LOST CHORD. "Voices In The Sky", "The Best Way To Travel" & "The Actor" are some of the better-conceived tracks on what is truly an uneven album. It even ends on a pretentious note with "Om", which we all know is the mantra for meditation advocates the world over. But it has been joked about so much, that this song may not be able to stand up to a listen without being criticized. All in all, IN SEARCH OF THE LOST CHORD seemed like a novel idea at the time, but the Moody Blues didn't seem to take into account of how the album would sound 3 decades later. With all the meditation & hippie vibes (couldn't resist using that term) surrounding it, LOST CHORD can't help but sound rather dated today. This pattern would continue for the next few albums before the Moodies slowly began to pursue other avenues with albums like 1970's A QUESTION OF BALANCE.
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5.0 out of 5 stars This is why they are just singers in a rock and roll band, April 15 2001
By 
David E. Levine (Peekskill , NY USA) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
The Moody Blues put together cohesive theme albums of which this is a great example. This cd explores eastern mysticism and many of the cuts, such as "Om" are very spiritual. Thus, many fans treated the Moody Blues as sorts of demigods. When young fans would meet the Moody Blues at airports and literally throw themselves at their feet, begging for the band members to bless them, it became too much for Mike Pinder who ultimately left the group. It is also the reason for the song, in a later album, "I'm Just a Singer in a Rock and Roll Band." Years ago, albums were in vinyl with two sides. I hated having to flip the album over but, often one side of an album would be really great. To me, side B, starting with "Voices in the Sky" and ending with "Om," was such a side. It's not as though side A has any weaknesses ... it doesn't. It's just that side B is almost true perfection. Side B of their "Days of Future Past" album starting with "Tuesday Afternoon" and concluding with "Nights in White Satin" is another example of an absolutely perfect album side. Of course, we lose the concept of "sides" with cds.
The cd starts out strongly with "Ride My See Saw" a rocker, and continues strongly with "Dr. Livingston I Presume" and "House of Four Doors." The latter song, in the space of 4 minutes, manages to piece together what seems like an endless saga. The phrasing in the switching to various verses of the song seems to draw it out into epic proprtions. The song is one which is hard to hum along to but then switches to a very melodic chorus. This is a great cd and exemplifies the almost mystical aura that surrounded the Moody Blues. I loved my vinyl version in college and love my remastered cd now which I share with my two sons.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Hey look at that album cover, Feb. 24 2001
By A Customer
A friend of my older brother had this record in 1968 and I briefly remember examing the cover and the yantra. I didn't have a chance to hear it as "Switched on Bach" was being played on the hi-fi, and I was heading out the door. Then in 1970 when I heard "Question" on the radio, which I immediately liked, they mentioned the group was the Moody Blues. I knew then that I had to buy their records. Out of the 4 Moody Blues in the record bin, "Lost Chord" had the wildest cover, and I was, of course, "familiar" with it. In what would become a ritual I waited until evening and laid on the floor with headphones on for a test spin. What occurred was pretty memorable- after "Departing" I immediately recognized "See-Saw" had been played by our late night AM radio jockey, Roy Cooper. This was when AM DJs were allowed to make they own playlists. I never knew the title, and hearing this on my record was akin to finding some lost jewel or something. Then "Legend" came on and again-deja vu- I heard this on our FM radio station, as well as on a local TV car commercial advertising custom paisley car tops of all things. When "Travel" came on-another FM favorite-I just couldn't believe that all these great songs had come from the same group! I was pretty impressed. The sequencing was pretty smart. One side had two of the four vocalists highlighted, and side two seemed to say-you haven't seen nothing yet-here's Justin Hayward. And to start side 2 with "Voices In the Sky" was just superb programming. Troughout the album all members are treated as equals-but I can't help noticing Haywards nice 12 string work. Sure the sleeve is 1/5 the size it used to be, and the Yantra isn't included anymore, but thats what used record stores are for. 30 years later I still get a charge out of this record.
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5.0 out of 5 stars A spiritual journey, Feb. 12 2001
By 
Matt Walsh (Pepperell, MA United States) - See all my reviews
They had done the symphony thing and pulled it off with flying colors. But this follow-up was pure, 100% Moody Blues. Of the 32 (!) different instruments used on this album, every one of them was played by one of the five band members. With this and other albums, they earned the nickname of "the world's smallest symphony orchestra."
This album is a journey, from beginning to end, in search of the chord and many other things. There is a heavy Eastern Philosophical influence, especially on the Mike Pinder contributions (Best Way to Travel, Om.) The songs flow into each other beautifully, making it sound like one continuous song. In every song, the singer yearns for something which that can never be defined in words. Mike Pinder's searing mellotron and Ray Thomas's soaring flute are the definitive sounds of the album.
Of course, this is the album that yielded two of the Moodies greatest and most enduring concert pieces, the rollicking "Ride My See-saw" and psychadelic "Legend of a Mind." Another standout is "The Actor," A Justin Hayward ballad so haunting it is in the same league as "Nights in White Satin." Then there's the lovely "Voices in the Sky," and John Lodge's epic, expermental "House of Four Doors," which samples musical styles throughout history.
This album is absolutely loaded with beautiful, experimental music. Why this band is so often not considered a part of the Prog Rock genre I'll never know.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Wish I had all my Albums back!, Feb. 9 2001
Of all the groups of the last 3o years there has been no better than this group! Please anybody that can hear will know what geniuses this group was, and still is. I started with them before I went to Vietnam, and remain faithful to this day.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Far out, Jan. 26 2001
By 
There's no avoiding the fact that this is pretty pretentious stuff. All these vague spoken word introductions, half-understood hinduisms and tributes to Tim Leary make for some fairly sloppy lyrics (and even some offkey singing on "Om") - however, they also make this album a fascinating period piece. "Ride My Seesaw" remains a genuinely exciting track, and the Moodies always provide good melodies and interesting sounds. I love the mellotron effects throughout this album. If you want some trippy fun, you will enjoy this a lot.
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In Search Of The Lost Chord
In Search Of The Lost Chord by Moody Blues (Audio CD - 2008)
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