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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars almost 20 years gone by...
Wow, hard to believe. I grew up with this album.
The new album "The Cure" has me breaking out my Cure collection. This album is a masterpiece of pop songcraft, and still has enough of an edge to keep it intriguing all these years. The production sounds a bit dated and tinny, but that should be fixed real soon as The Cure get ready to release the re-masters...
Published on July 2 2004 by Michael

versus
3.0 out of 5 stars Understandably inconsistent.
"Inconsistent" is the right word for Head on the Door. That makes sense - Robert Smith and his homies had just tired of their horribly scary goth posturing (Faith, Pornography) and were searching for a new style. Head on the Door is a very strange venture into dance-pop.
It's certainly something, and there's no other Cure album quite like it. The first...
Published on July 6 2001 by Angry Mofo


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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars almost 20 years gone by..., July 2 2004
By 
Michael (New York City) - See all my reviews
This review is from: The Head on the Door (Audio CD)
Wow, hard to believe. I grew up with this album.
The new album "The Cure" has me breaking out my Cure collection. This album is a masterpiece of pop songcraft, and still has enough of an edge to keep it intriguing all these years. The production sounds a bit dated and tinny, but that should be fixed real soon as The Cure get ready to release the re-masters later in 2004.
There's not a bad song on this album. It's a great place to start if you are interested in getting into The Cure. This is the album that they splashed big with in the US. Then you could work your way backwards and forwards to fill in the gaps. I would give it 5 stars, if not for what was to come in the future...
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5.0 out of 5 stars solid gold cure, March 15 2004
By 
Tim Knight (Manchester, Up North) - See all my reviews
This review is from: The Head on the Door (Audio CD)
Back in my goth days of the late 1980's I kinda scorned this album, I loved The Cure of course but thought that this was just a bit too poppy and chirpy for it's own good. Hearing it again, after many years, I was blown away by how well this has stood the test of time, perhaps better than any other of Robbie Smith's offerings.
From start to finish this album bounces and rocks through many different styles and influences and colours, though maintains it's 'Cureness' through Smith's deliciously crazy lyrics, his definitive, angular guitar work and instantly recognizable voice.
I would have to say in hindsight the sonwriting on this album is better than any other Cure album. There is just not one bad moment on all 10 tracks. The angst of earlier (and later) releases is still there, it's just less relentless, and expressed in a wider tapestry of musical references.
People always associate The Cure with doom and gloom - they were always much more than that. They are one of the most interesting, eccentric and unique bands of that emerged in the 80's and Robert Smith is about the only guy who looks good in lipstick and eyeliner.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Sensational Cure, Dec 21 2003
By 
Christopher R. Cicatelli "cicatelli" (bethesda, md) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: The Head on the Door (Audio CD)
this Cure album, to me, is one of the most complete recordings in the entire Cure catalogue. i remember back in '85 when i first heard this album, and it quickly became a classic in my music collection as track #10, Sinking, came to a close.
everything from In Between Days with its undeniable groove to the flamenco sip of The Blood....wow, good stuff.
The Kyoto Song is a slow groove....The Baby Screams is some of the quirky, fun Cure that us Cure fans love so much. A Night Like This, Sinking, Six Different Ways, and Push are simply some of the finest Cure songs ever written....they feel "grand" "deep"...i dunno, there is just something about those tracks that i dig....the words, guitar, keys, and of course, Smith's voice...trust me, this release is about alot more than the hit "Close to Me" (which i skip 8 times out of 10 anyway) Head on the Door is a different side of the Cure, but it is still the Cure, and it is fantastic.
Heaven
Give me a sign
Waiting for the sun to shine
Pleasure fills up my dreams
And I love it
Like a baby screams
- The Cure/The Baby Screams/Head on the Door/1985/R. Smith
peace,
cic
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5.0 out of 5 stars One of The Cure's Finest, Sept. 11 2003
This review is from: The Head on the Door (Audio CD)
For The Cure, the instrumentation on this album is surprisingly upbeat with lots of new-wave/synth/europop beats, but the music contrasts starkly to the darkness and angst of Robert Smith's lyrics. This dichotomy makes for one of the best Cure albums available.
The album kicks off with the beat laden "In Between Days", and the contrast between lyrical content and music is very evident on this great song. Other classics include "Push", the exotic "Kyoto Song", and the nifty spanish guitars of "Blood". My personal favorite on this album is the deceptively simple "Six Different Ways", which is another confessional song from Robert. The balance between darkness and light has always been a central theme in the Cure's work, and nowhere is it maintained better than on "The Head on the Door".
For those looking for an introduction to the Cure, this is a great album to get started. Other strong contenders would have to be "Disintegration" and "Pornography", but the more upbeat moments on THOTD help to ease you into some of their even darker work.
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5.0 out of 5 stars 10 perfect pop songs, Aug. 25 2003
This review is from: The Head on the Door (Audio CD)
The Cure's discography can be divided in half with a thick, black line into two halves. On one side, are the dark albums (Pornography, Disintegration, Bloodflowers, Faith), where epic, depressing soundscapes are plenty. And on the other side are their lighter, poppier works (Kiss Me, Kiss Me, Kiss Me, Boys Don't Cry, Wish), which favor catchiness and instrumental experimentation over raw emotion. The Head On The Door falls into the latter category. All ten tracks are perfect 80s pop songs that get stuck in your head and never fail to delight.
Whether it be the dancable Eurobeat of "In between days", the spanish-flavored "The Blood", or the quirky "Six Different Ways", this album has something for everyone and is a good introduction to the Cure. It won't stick with you immediately, but you'll soon come to love it.
If you're looking to get into the Cure, make The Head on the Door your first purchase. Or, if you're already a Cure fan, I give this album my *highest* recommendation.
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3.0 out of 5 stars Understandably inconsistent., July 6 2001
This review is from: The Head on the Door (Audio CD)
"Inconsistent" is the right word for Head on the Door. That makes sense - Robert Smith and his homies had just tired of their horribly scary goth posturing (Faith, Pornography) and were searching for a new style. Head on the Door is a very strange venture into dance-pop.
It's certainly something, and there's no other Cure album quite like it. The first track takes on New Order at their own game (and beats them), another ("The Blood") has a distinctly Spanish sound (the song is about a Spanish wine), and so forth. Every song is different. In some cases, we already begin to see the development of The Cure's future trappings - "Push" and some others have the same otherworldly guitars that would later become the band's signature style, "Close to Me" has a synth lead very much like the later "Lovesong," and so on. While the music is almost always great, however, Smith's voice occasionally is not up to par - it may be just under-rehearsal (most of the tracks here went on the album after the first take).
Anyways, the best moments are decidedly "Push," "A Night Like This" and "Sinking." The worst are "Close To Me" and "Screw," the latter probably being the most embarrassing Cure song ever. The rest are good while they're playing, but ultimately forgettable. When the album hits its high points, though, make no mistake - it shines very brightly. It closes with "Sinking," making a wonderful parting impression that serves to erase the bewilderment (as in "um...why is this on here?") brought on by, say, "Screw." I recommend it for Cure fans who are interested in tracking the band's musical development (or for Cure fans, period) - it's really not a very accurate introduction to the Cure for those who know nothing about them. Get Wish, and if you like it, by all means get this CD. If not, well, you probably shouldn't.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Bringing down the light, Jan. 6 2001
By 
loteq (Regensburg/Germany) - See all my reviews
This review is from: The Head on the Door (Audio CD)
Giving up the self-imposed exile from which "The Top" emerged and deciding to break through to mainstream pop audiences and daytime radio airplay, Robert Smith ended up creating the band's overall most varied and experimental album. There's a seemingly conscious effort by both the band and the production not to allow this release to be pigeonhold, be it through surprisingly groovy dance songs like "Close to me" or by playing around with styles that no one would have expected from Robert a few years earlier. A significant step forward in the band's rapid sonic evolution during the mid-'80s is the initially promising opener, "Inbetween days". Very similar to New Order's more organic songs like "Age of consent" or "Regret", this song is as catchy as pop music can be - a strong, rumbling rhythm combined with fast-paced acoustic guitars, simple keyboard melodies, and certainly this Hooky style of bass playing. Such tracks are very spontaneous and have an unpolished edge, almost sounding like they were recorded live instead of being put together in the studio. Robert himself said, "Eight songs (out of ten) are first takes, which is something we haven't done since we made 'Seventeen seconds'". It makes perfect sense, since he wanted to abandon productions like "Pornography" where he used to work in the studio for more than 20 hours a day to ensure total control over the project. "Kyoto song" and the ponderous "Six different ways" are the closest to throwaways, but the strong flamenco flavor of "The blood" redeems everything, complete with tasteful musicianship and appropriate vocal performance. "Push", actually the album's centerpiece, demonstrates both the pop-oriented side and the darker undercurrents of "The head" in full effect, as the band delivers arena-rock with lyrics about physical and emotional desolation. "The baby screams" and "A night.." (with saxophone solo) also follow the theme of the aforementioned song and manage to be both rocking and atmospheric. "Close to me" is easily one of the most quirky dance songs of the '80s, mixing shuffling drum beats with a funky bass line, mimicked toy piano, and minimal organ backing. Perhaps it provided a blueprint for some of the Aphex Twin's recent efforts. The drilling, abrasive bass line of "Screw" is another fairly strange element of this album, but the Cure do not completely turn their back on the sound of previous efforts: "Sinking" brings the album to a fine conclusion with its thick layers of synthesizers and ominous bass throb. Overall, "The head" appears as a transitional work, neither eschewing the trademark approach of the band nor quintessentially Cure-sounding like the band's early-'80s work. Like the subsequent "Kiss me..", it forced critics to question their penchant for labelling the Cure as goth-rock, but provided no easy answers. Those who like their '80s independent rock spiced with variety and eccentricity will certainly enjoy this work; personally, "The head" is not among my favorite Cure albums. Its mood doesn't go as deep as that of, say, "Disintegration", and the whole affair is a little disjointed and uncohesive. Simply put: Another solid album with two strong hit singles, but not recommended as first purchase.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Pure Cure...at its finest!, June 19 2000
By 
Christopher R. Cicatelli "cicatelli" (bethesda, md) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: The Head on the Door (Audio CD)
Whenever I hear the first drum beats of this album, I get a smile on my face. Since listening to this album for the first time in the winter of '86, I've savored every note, every word, every emotion, every second. It is truly one of the finest releases of the '80's, yet the music really is timeless. It's a happier Cure than found on "Faith", "Pornography", or "Seventeen Seconds". Don't get me wrong, those albums are excellent, but "Head On The Door" was a new direction for Robert Smith and company. The lyrics on this album are still dark, twisted, and thought provoking like earlier albums, but they are matched with a lighter, happier sounding music. Even on tracks like "Sinking", and "A Night Like This" where the images are dark and brooding, the music is unlike any they've done before. I love this album. It always seems fresh and vibrant...even after all these years (15 to be exact) "The Head On The Door" still makes me happy to be a Cure fan.
Track highlights from "The Head On The Door"? Hmm, they're all great but if I had to pick..."InBetween Days", "Six Different Ways", "A Night Like This", "Push", and "Kyoto Song". Some of the Cure classics by far.
Although the Cure has come to the end of the road in what has been an amazing musical career, I thank the musical gods that looked upon Robert Smith, Laurence Tolhurst, Porl Thompson, Simon Gallup and Boris Williams during the making of this excellent album. Five stars? Nah, I give it six.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Just the right Cure, June 11 2000
By 
dcinDC "dcinDC" (Washington, DC United States) - See all my reviews
This review is from: The Head on the Door (Audio CD)
The review up top is right: This is the Cure album to start with. But maybe that's because this is the one I happened to start with. Actually, I think it's excellent because it's right at what I would call the middle of the Cure's range of sounds. It's still got some of their early punk edginess, some of their 80's danciness, some of the dark goth-like tones, and a hint of the gloss that you'll find in their more recent albums.
Even though it falls in this niche, the styles of music on this album vary widely and the lyrics are haunting as always. This is definitely one of my favorite albums and seems to fit a variety of moods and settings. I bought this album on vinyl when it first came out and have been listening to it periodically ever since (although I've "upgraded" to a CD version). Every once in a while I forget about it and find it dusty on my shelf. When I clean it off and pop it back in the player I'm always glad I did.
If you only know the Cure's recent stuff, definitely go out and get this album. If you've never heard of the Cure and don't just want a greatist hits album, get this one. If you don't care...well, then nevermind...
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4.0 out of 5 stars Poppy, shmaltzy, Wonderful, April 26 2000
By 
"sidheshell" (Corvallis, Oregon) - See all my reviews
This review is from: The Head on the Door (Audio CD)
I think with the exception of the Top this is one of the "poppiest" Cure albums, but that should not deter any one from purchasing this album. Some of the songs on this album, although dramatic, are more meaningful than the fluffy implication implied by "pop". And it tis wondre'fool car driving music! If you are looking for some more typical Cure...(yeah right, no one of their albums can be classified as typical due to the many sounds they tried on, flinged off, tried on again, then added smudgy bright red lipstick to)....then try Disintegration (much more textured and beautiful like rivers weaving themselves) or Faith (very grey and haunting like falling clouds of blank gauze)....
The Blood, and Kyoto songs are my favorite. I really like this album, i guess it's got STYLE. It's there in Robert's voice, it is definately in the guitars, and the drum stlye, and yeah they did pretty good here but don't take this too seriously...or you might get a case of 80's poisoning......hee hee
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The Head on the Door -Remaster
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