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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Slow but Great
The first time I watched this movie, I was a little bit tired and I fell asleep 20 minutes in, concluding that it was the most boring movie I had ever seen. A few years later, in a more energetic state, I decided to give it a try, this time lowering my expectations and bracing myself for the slow pace. This time, I still found the slow pace bothersome, but I found that...
Published on June 10 2012 by Jimbo Jones

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3.0 out of 5 stars Great Movie
I really enjoyed this movie. The special effects were really ahead of their times. I remember seeing it at the theatre when it came out. It really left quite an empression on me.
Published 17 months ago by Errol P Jodrey


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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Slow but Great, June 10 2012
This review is from: 2001: A Space Odyssey (Two-Disc Special Edition) (Bilingual) (DVD)
The first time I watched this movie, I was a little bit tired and I fell asleep 20 minutes in, concluding that it was the most boring movie I had ever seen. A few years later, in a more energetic state, I decided to give it a try, this time lowering my expectations and bracing myself for the slow pace. This time, I still found the slow pace bothersome, but I found that the movie was so wonderful in every other aspect that I could look past some of the (excrusiatingly) long sequences and enjoy the masterful visuals, music, tension, and mystery that Kubrick assembled. Honestly, this might be the most beautiful film ever made. Every shot looks like it could be an award-winning photograph. Technically, it appears superior to many current films. The movie's ending is highly perplexing, but it didn't bother me too much since it is obviously meant to be pondered by the audience. Overall, it's easy to see why this is considered one of the greatest films ever made and I consider it my favourite of Kubrick's. The only problem I have with it (I say this at the risk of receiving some negative reviews) is the pacing in parts. I feel that 20 minutes or more could be easily shaved off if some of the sequences were shortened slightly. For example, there are numerous times in the movie where we watch a person or object float slowly in space for minutes at a time. While I can appreciate the devotion to realism, I'm still tempted to press the 1.3x feature on my remote for such parts. But overall this is a fantastic work of science fiction and shouldn't be passed by simply because it is slow.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Classic!, March 17 2014
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Tom Turvey "Priscilla Turvey" (Ontario, Canada) - See all my reviews
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Everyone needs to see this movie and read the books. It's slow moving but there's so much subtle story lines and details it's superb!
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5.0 out of 5 stars Manned soace flight, Sept. 8 2013
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There is a little more to this movie than meets the eye in that it control systems take over in a very sneaky way and what the consequences are when man and machine are pitted against each other but for me did not answer the question are we really prepared to allow machines to run our lives and wellbring.
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3.0 out of 5 stars Great Movie, Feb. 6 2013
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Errol P Jodrey (Victoria, British Columbia Canada) - See all my reviews
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I really enjoyed this movie. The special effects were really ahead of their times. I remember seeing it at the theatre when it came out. It really left quite an empression on me.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Odyssey for Sure, June 23 2012
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This review is from: 2001: A Space Odyssey (Two-Disc Special Edition) (Bilingual) (DVD)
The added material on disk two is very informative. There is not much else to say about the movie as it is a remake or reformat of the original. Some of the old boring factor is present when some of the scenes go on longer than necessary but that is not the fault of material but the direction and the cutting room personal.
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3.0 out of 5 stars Maybe I just don't get it..., March 14 2004
By 
Kyle Stewart (Georgia) - See all my reviews
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How many scenes were cut out for this version? I haven't seen anyone else complain about it, so I'll assume this is the full cut (it was the first time I've seen it). It was entertaining at time, I particularly like watching the monkeys evolve at the beggining, and think that should have been drug out to it's full extent from the book, rather than shortened so much (I've only read part of the book, but I thought it was pretty good), and I thought the showdown with Hal was exilarating, but I didn't get the ending. I plan to rewatch it soon, and maybe then it'll make more sense.
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2.0 out of 5 stars Boring, but the special effects are terrific, Jan. 11 2003
By 
Linda Linguvic (New York City) - See all my reviews
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I didn't see this film when it first opened in 1968. In those years I didn't get to movies much. And VCRs hadn't been invented yet. But the film was groundbreaking, and of course I heard about it. And through the years I've seen excerpts, but never the real thing. Now it's the year 2003, and the year 2001 has already passed. But as I soon discovered while viewing the film is that it's not about future scientific discovery; it's about a state of mind, a philosophical statement about man's place in the universe.
It starts with apes finding a monolith, then picking up some bones and using them as tools to kill. The scene then shifts far into the future and we see a space capsule with some supposed high-tech features. There's a special mission, which is never clear. And a computer named Hal, which starts to act like a human being. Eventually, the lone surviving astronaut reaches Jupiter, goes though an aging process and gets reborn as a baby. All of this takes 139 minutes to tell. There's very little dialogue, just a lot of classical music. The special effects are so good that they won the film's only academy award that year. And the director, Stanley Kubrick, will be remembered as a genius. The film is his personal view of the world...
Personally, I found the film just plain boring. There's a limit on how long I can sit and watch special effects. Most of the time I spent wondering exactly what it all meant. And when I discovered early on that it didn't mean anything, I just didn't care. I really wanted to like this film. After all it is classic. And I definitely hoped the DVD would have some special features explaining its making. Sadly, though, there is not one bit of commentary. The film has to be judged completely on its own.
I'm a film buff and so I'm glad I saw it just for the experience. But I didn't like it at all. And can't recommend it.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Defiantely One of the Top 10 Films, Jan. 18 2002
By 
Matthew S. Schweitzer "zohoe" (Columbus, OH United States) - See all my reviews
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Kubrick's 2001 is not for everyone. But anyone with a little bit of insight and imagination will not be able to help being captivated by this wonderful and powerful film. 2001 is not only a realistic space epic, it is a commentary on the past, present, and future of mankind. It shows how small humanity is in the grand scheme of the universe and how we hold our destiny in our own hands. This film prompted a lifelong interest in science, space exploration, and technology. It's effect was similar to that of another great sci-fi epic, Star Wars, but it is by far a much deeper and overall, really, a technically better film. It remains the only movie to accurately depict human spaceflight, though Arthur C. Clarke got the timeframe for space colonization off the mark by a few years. But keep in mind that at the time, no one was predicting, as Clarke did, the tremendous potential and impact that computers and artificial intelligence would have on future society. Take a look around today and , though we don't have HAL yet, see how much of he did get right, and how our technology and computers have permeated our entire planet. This represents the hope, and the danger, facing all mankind.
So much of this film has been absorbed by pop culture it is amazing..."What are you doing Dave?"...The Star Child...HAL...The Blue Danube...it truly stands as a monument to cinema and it is a film that I cannot recommend highly enough.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The greatest science fiction film of all time, Dec 23 2009
By 
LeBrain - See all my reviews
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This review is from: 2001: A Space Odyssey (Two-Disc Special Edition) (Bilingual) (DVD)
Once upon a time, when the year 2001 seemed aeons away, director Stanley Kubruck (Dr. Strangelove) contacted author Arthur C. Clarke (Childhood's End) to discuss making "the proverbial good science fiction movie". Both were sick of films that passed for science fiction, but were actually monster movies set in space, or were fiction films with the science replaced by fantasy.

The result was 2001: A Space Odyssey, the film, and a companion book of the same name which is actually a completely different animal. The film -- striking, innovative, visually engrossing, ambiguous, and scientifically solid -- is as good today as it was in 1968, even if many of the "predictions" of the film have failed to come to pass. (Perhaps if the shuttle didn't explode in '86, we'd be closer to having moon bases today?)

Separated into four chapters (The Dawn Of Man, TMA-1, Jupiter Mission (and an intermission with music), and finally Jupiter and Beyond the Infinite), 2001 has no dialogue at all for the entire first quarter of the film. Beginning with a blank screen and "Atmospheres" by Ligeti, this is a film paradoxically anchored by both music and silence. The screen changes to the Earth rising over the moon, and the sun rising over the Earth (an important clue and recurring symbol) accompanied by "Thus Spoke Zarathustra". We are then introduced to a tribe of pre-human apes (Australopithecus, perhaps), starving and on the verge of extinction. Other tribes are stronger and out-competing them. There is no dialogue here but the barking of the apes, yet that and the scenery speak volumes. Suddenly one morning, the game has changed: A mysterious black monolith has appeared. The apes are drawn to it, and soon find that they are now able to compete with predators thanks to a new discovery: weapons.

The TMA-1 chapter begins with what Clarke has called "the longest jump-cut in history" and we see that humanity has evolved into a spacegoing race. Orbital weapons platforms orbit the earth as a shuttle is making way to an under-construction space station. The Blue Danube plays as the spacecraft dance in calculated perfection. Our first main character, Dr. Heywood Floyd, arrives on the station and we are given some tantalizing clues as to why he's made this trip: Rumours of a plague outbreak on the moon. Yet this is just a cover story. As Floyd makes his way to the moon in another beautifully choreographed sequence, we learn that a magnetic anomoly was discovered in the crater Tycho (named after astronomer Tycho Brahe) -- Tycho Magnetic Anomoly 1, or TMA-1. This discovery is so important, that the cover story was created to keep everyone far away from Tycho.

The discover of TMA-1 leads to another jump forward in time, to a mission to Jupiter helmed by David Bowman (the perpetually young Keir Dullea) and Frank Poole (Gary Lockwood of the second Star Trek pilot episode). Aboard their ship the Discovery are three sleeping astronauts and the most famous computer of all time, H.A.L. 9000 (voiced by Stratford resident Douglas Rain). Bowman and Poole do not know why they are going to Jupiter, but we are given a glipse into the possible life of two men with nothing but a computer for company, in space for years as they make the long transit to the biggest planet in our solar system. H.A.L. is a character to himself, perhaps the one with the most emotion onboard the Discovery.

Things go wrong when an antenna is predicted to fail by H.A.L., requiring one of the astronauts to go outside and repair it. H.A.L., who controls the life support and every function of Discovery, begins to show signs of what humans call mistakes. Yet no 9000-series computer has ever failed, or found to be in error. You will be haunted by the song "Daisy" by the end of this chapter.

After an intermission, Discovery finally arrives at Jupiter and its true mission is revealed. This chapter too has no dialogue, bringing us full circle. David Bowman once again must venture outside the ship and find out just what was discovered on the moon, how it relates to Jupiter, and perhaps even how it related to our millenia-dead ancestors. What follows is one of the most baffling and strange sequences in movie history, one which will require dozens of viewings to appreciate, let alone understand. The beauty of this final sequence is that there is no right or wrong interpretation. While on the surface it may appear to be a psychedelic caleidoscope of colour followed by a bizarre dialogue-less encounter with a being that seems to have no bearing on reality, it is actually Kubrick's way of showing the audience something that is beyond anyone's imagination. Like the audience, David Bowman and humanity have come full circle.

Lacking what modern audiences might call action, lacking typical space sound effects (there is no sound in space!), lacking dialogue for most of the movie, and lacking any sort of warm human characters (except maybe H.A.L. who is not human), this movie was a challenge to watch in 1968 and is still a challenge today. It is, however, a piece of art that trancends its genre and is a landmark in film making. Kubrick, always a visionary and always breaking through boundaries of what could not be done in film, outdid himself and made a science fiction film that still has not been topped 40 years later. Nobody has made anything this epic, this beautiful, this deep or this scientifically sound since. The special effects -- all practical effects and mostly in-camera, as CG did not yet exist -- still stand up today. Nobody will ever forget the rotating Dicovery set that allowed one character to be seated while another seemingly walked from the top of the cylinder, down the side, and sat down next to him.

Sure -- we don't have a moon base. We haven't sent anyone to Jupiter. However, we do talk to each other via video conference. We do have a space station. We have created computers that can beat the best humans at chess. This is not that far off. If they had named this film 2031: A Space Odyssey, we might be in the right ballpark. In the end, the year does not matter. You never see modern Earth in the movie at all.

This DVD release is loaded with special features and has a beautiful transfer in 2.20:1, as Kubrick shot it and intended it to be. Both Dullea and Lockwood provide an audio commentary. There are documentaries about Kubrick, about the predictions of the film, and about the effects. The only thing missing is the Arthur C. Clarke lecture from the first issue DVD.

2001: A Space Odyssey is, without any doubt or any argument, the greatest science fiction film of all time. With Kubrick and Clarke now both gone, I doubt we will ever see anything like it again. 5 stars is not enough of a rating. I give this movie 200 billion stars, one for each star in our galaxy.
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars 2001: A Space Odyssey, May 2 2004
By 
Tim L. Scott (Springfield, KY USA) - See all my reviews
This iconic, 5-star film has never been equaled, but the film transfer on this DVD is as poorly engineered as any DVD I have ever seen. Video compression artifacts abound, and the disc is a literal museum of DVD technology problems. Exposure errors litter the transfer, along with strange grids and patterns in high-contrast scenes, color smears, and false color modeling of objects (see the monolith in orbit around Jupiter). Save your money on this fancily-packaged product and buy an old-fashioned Criterion laserdisc if you want to see this movie as Kubrick intended (he personally approved the Criterion laserdisc transfer).
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2001: A Space Odyssey (Two-Disc Special Edition) (Bilingual)
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