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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Orange clock still keeps time
This movie is a genuine classic. The picture quality on Blue-ray is outstanding. Amazing what these guys can do with old film. If you have never viewed this movie...what are you waiting for ? The sound track isn't going to blow anyone away, so this movie isn't going to show off that aspect of your home theatre, but the story and picture more than make up for it.This is a...
Published on July 1 2010 by Peter Boyce

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3.0 out of 5 stars Clockwork Orange
I have not seen this movie since college (1982)My son is taking film studies in school and had been discussing this movie with his teacher. He was surprised to hear I had seen it, and asked if I would order it so he could watch it. He loved it! But who doesn't like Malcolm McDowell as a bad guy?
Published 21 months ago by tommy


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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Orange clock still keeps time, July 1 2010
By 
Peter Boyce (Canada) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This movie is a genuine classic. The picture quality on Blue-ray is outstanding. Amazing what these guys can do with old film. If you have never viewed this movie...what are you waiting for ? The sound track isn't going to blow anyone away, so this movie isn't going to show off that aspect of your home theatre, but the story and picture more than make up for it.This is a must have title for anyones collection. Also, there is a recent interview with Malcolm McDowell and his friends and family that id definately worth a watch.Many of the movies from this time period haven't aged well as far as the story lines go. But Kubrick was way ahead of his time when he put this movie out.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Kubricks "out there" film, March 10 2013
By 
Robert Badgley (St Thomas,Ontario,Canada) - See all my reviews
(TOP 500 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: Clockwork Orange [Import] (DVD)
A Clockwork Orange(released Dec/71)was quite the oddity then(I remember well its premiere)and it still remains so,to me.The film takes place in a dystopian near future world in England and remnants of the 60s are everywhere to be seen.To take on such a novel as Burgess got published in /62,would have been an overwhelming undertaking for most directors,but Kubrick rose to the challenge and it remains one of his better known works.The film stars a myriad of wonderful English actors,but the star of course is McDowell himself,who convincingly portrays the leader/hoodlum of the film.The film is many things,not the least of which would include a pervading darkness,cynicism,perverse sexuality from actual acts to artwork,brutality,humour,pathos and metaphoric story telling.
The plot finds McDowell as the leader of a gang.The world he inhabits is filled with such young men who randomly commit unlawful acts of every description.We follow McDowell and his group of misfits from one distasteful incident to another which include beatings,robberies and rapes.They talk in a funny combination of slang,double speak and Yoda-like sentence structure.All is not nirvana in the gang,as slowly but surely two start to rebel against McDowell's leadership.McDowell temporarily puts down the "uprising".However one night when he is leaving a home that he had broken into with the help of his boys,they clobber him in the face with a milk bottle.The gang flees and they leave McDowell to the police.McDowell is taken away and imprisoned.His "rehabilitation" takes the form of sucking up to the Catholic priest in the jail,but all the time his thoughts are bent towards violence.
One day McDowell approaches the priest with the idea of participating in a new program he has heard that can rehabilitate him within two weeks.When a member of Parliament makes a surprise visit to the prison McDowell speaks up and is chosen to enter the program.McDowell thinks this is going to be a lark and his way of drastically reducing his 14 years sentence,two years of which he has already served.The program has McDowell in a theater with his eyes forced wide open,watching unpleasant and violent films on the screen.As he does,his eyes are doused with a chemical.As the program progresses and the more violence he sees the more sick he becomes watching them.To top this off the doctors run the music of Beethoven,which McDowell had previously adored,but after the program it makes him as sick as looking at the films themselves. When the program's two weeks are up McDowell is released.
He goes home but his old room in his parents house has been rented out to a stranger.He is forced to leave and his troubles on the street just begin.He first runs into a street drunk his gang had beat at the beginning of the film.He is recognized and McDowell gets a reciprocal beating from him and several other drunks.Two cops then show up which turn out to be two members of his old gang.They take him out to a remote country location and almost drown him in a trough of water.Barely able to walk he makes his way to a house.He is taken in by the resident there,who is in a wheelchair and is looked after by a well built male servant.As McDowell is laying in a warm bathtub he starts to warble"Singing in the Rain";a big mistake.This is the home he and his gang had entered and crippled its owner and raped his wife,who died shortly after the incident.The owner now recognizes him and decides he will get revenge.He phones two other people and they drug him.He is placed in an upstairs room and when McDowell comes to he is being sonically bombarded with Beethoven's 9th Symphony.This is of course anathema to McDowell who tries to commit suicide by jumping out of the bedroom window.
McDowell wakes up in the hospital and is being nursed back to life courtesy of the government.McDowell has become front page news now because of his now"barbaric" rehabilitation treatment at the hands of the doctors and ultimately the government.The very member of Parliament who put McDowell in the program to begin with in the prison,now visits him.He asks for McDowells "help" in getting him out of his jam,in a roundabout way.In return McDowell will get a nice and comfortable job.As McDowell sits there in his bed posing with the politician,the cameras are flashing all around.However in McDowells mind we see his old bent and warped ideas now coming back to the fore,even though he has been considered "cured".
This film is just chock full of wonderful moments and Kubrick of course was a master of framing and lighting scenes that would remain unforgettable in ones mind.His staging of the drunk being beaten up or the moments leading up to the cat woman's killing are just two that stand out among many.I won't go into the metaphors and possible hidden meanings in this film,as it is full of them,but I think it is best left to film scholars better than I.Suffice it to say Kubrick conveys alot of information but makes it as entertaining as possible,in Kubricks own inimitable style.
Technically speaking the film is in its w/s a/r of 1:66:1.I found it generally clear and crisp but there were some scenes where colours would fluctuate and film blemishes would appear,so I would recommended a proper remastering of this film be done.Extras include commentary and the trailer.
All in all one of Kubricks most memorable and off beat films.It was quite a shocker on its release and it still packs quite the punch today.Between Kubricks great direction and McDowells beautiful portrayal of one heck of a tough and complex role,the movie still shines through.4-4 1/2 stars.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Strange and facinating, Feb. 20 2013
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This movie is a work of art in itself. I loved it when I first watched it 14 years ago and still love it today. I am so glad I bought it
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3.0 out of 5 stars Clockwork Orange, Oct. 17 2012
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This review is from: Clockwork Orange [Import] (DVD)
I have not seen this movie since college (1982)My son is taking film studies in school and had been discussing this movie with his teacher. He was surprised to hear I had seen it, and asked if I would order it so he could watch it. He loved it! But who doesn't like Malcolm McDowell as a bad guy?
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Future Shock, May 7 2010
By 
Dean Noble (London, England) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: A Clockwork Orange (2 Disc Special Edition) (Bilingual) (DVD)
Fresh from the success of 2001, Stanley Kubrick continues his forays into the future in this Orwellian tale of twenty first century dystopia. Written in 1962, released in theatres in 1970 and set in 1995, A Clockwork Orange delves into the strange fetishes and inclinations towards violence of a group of young drug addled street thugs who terrorize for the sheer visceral thrill and who rob and steal for the financial payoff of which they generate towards more drugs and more crime in a vicious repeating cycle. This dark futuresque vision was innovative in its time and won Stanley Kubrick some academy award nominations in 1970, the year it was released.
The movie starts with them at a local milk bar after having drunken milk laced with synthetic mescaline and adrenachrome. They then go on a few days of craziness through the streets and suburbs of London with all of this culminating in a final climactic act of horrific murder.
The hapless murderer is sent to a reform school and it is at this point that the real point of the movie is made.
The hero of the story, Alexander DeLarge is sent to H.M. Prison Parkmoor and volunteers for a controversial treatment intended to reform prisoners and to curb recidivism of the prison population.
The treatment involves the use of liberal doses of psychedelic and hallucinogenic drugs as well as the forced viewing of violent films. The level of enforcement of the viewing is so profound that eyelid clamps to keep the eyelids open is used as well as the frequent application of saline solution.

At this point, the author points out that the meaning of the title is that mankind is mostly a programmed animal going to work, the 9 to 5 ritualization but his innate essence is juicy and sweet like an orange, so that man is an exploited orange, a clockwork orange and perhaps with a catastrophic shock can man awaken to his true nature.

Through such treatments meant to induce an integral shock to the core of the system, Alexander is temporarily deprogrammed but with undesirable consequences.

At the end of the movie only with finding the balance between the civilized and the savage, the technological and the primeval is true happiness found.

Anthony Burgess also observes in this novel that the everyday speaking of the English language changes over time and new slang is constantly being formed as old slang steadily goes obsolete.

This is one of the finest movies ever made. Malcolm McDowell who starred in this movie moved on to even greater fame starring in Penthouse Magazine Bob Guccione's Caligula as the lurid and ill-fated Roman Emperor.

A Clockwork Orange also features Godfrey Quigley as the prison chaplain. He would also appear in the next Stanley Kubrick movie, Barry Lyndon as the Chevalier du Balibari.
Philip Stone is Alex's father in this movie. He would go on to appear in not one but two of the Stanley Kubrick movies. He would appear as the solicitor to the Lyndon estate in Barry Lyndon. And he would appear as Grady, the former caretaker of the Overlook Hotel.

The movie is very British and unlike other Stanley Kubrick movies in this one he makes no disguises or pretenses that he is filming in England, so there is a no restraint, no holds barred opening to the local atmosphere which supports and helps create this film.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars, July 25 2014
This review is from: A Clockwork Orange (2 Disc Special Edition) (Bilingual) (DVD)
One of the best movies ever, Stanley kubrick really aced this
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7 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Viddy this Horror Show for a taste of the old Ultraviolence, March 26 2006
A Clockwork Orange is a magnificent movie. Malcolm McDowell brilliantly portrays Alex, a young man who leads a gang of hooligans ("droogs"). They spend their spare time beating people up and raping women. Then Alex is arrested, goes to prison, and is released after volunteering to undergo a revolutionary treatment for deviant behaviour. I disliked this movie the first time I saw it. There seemed to be no point to the movie, and I found it boring and REALLY weird. How is it weird? All you need to do is watch the opening scene at the milk bar to realize how strange this movie is - the way people dress, the way Alex talks, and so on. Probably the strangest thing about A Clockwork Orange is the interior design of rooms and buildings. The record store, the milk bar, and so on have a very bizarre and futuristic look. For instance, the milk bar has tables and milk dispensers that look like statues of naked women. This movie is so strange, that most people who watch this movie will hate it for that factor alone. But it's important not to let the weirdness or the violence distract you from the point of this movie.
This movie is infamous for its violence. Even if you aren't bothered by the sight of people getting shot in an action movie or stabbed in a horror movie, you might not be able to stomach the violence in this movie. In one scene, the droogs surround and beat up an old drunkard. I'm guessing it's because A Clockwork Orange puts a human face on Alex's victims, whereas the victims in a typical horror movie don't seem like real people - they seem more like caricatures of human beings rather than real people, so we don't care what happens to them. Even though the drunkard isn't killed, it doesn't change the way the viewer feels about the scene, because of the way the camera captures the brutality of the beating. There's also a violent scene that isn't unsettling - it's intentionally hilarious. I refer to the scene when the two gangs have a brawl that looks so unreal it looks like a professional wrestling match - the background music makes this scene even more enjoyable. So it's obvious that Kubrick tried to be silly rather than realisitc with regard to some aspects of the movie - like the way Alex runs into his former victims, one after another. I never read Anthony Burgess' book, so I am unsure if there's any silliness in his story.
This movie is also infamous for scenes of rape. We may consider murder to be a worse crime than rape, but ask anyone and they'll say they would prefer to see a character in a movie be murdered rather than raped. In one nasty scene, a woman is about to be gang-raped, but she manages to escape before it happens. But viewers aren't let off the hook in the scene at the writer's house. The close-up of the woman's face is more than enough to leave viewers shaken. In addition to showing the anguish of the victim, this movie shows that the victims of rape are scarred for life. That becomes apparent in a later scene when the writer describes the fate of his wife. At face value, these graphic scenes will seem exploitive. But they aren't. Kubrick should be commended for not allowing this movie to sink to the level of exploitation.
One of the most horrifying scenes is when the naked woman appears onstage before Alex. The sight of Alex on his knees, in a state of incredible agony while the audience applauds, is terrifying. It's as if mankind is applauding the complete destruction of the human spirit. It's like they are endorsing the means to turn us all into mindless robots, too afraid to think or feel anything, and spending every moment of our waking lives in dread of triggering the next bout of incredible physical pain. The thought of living under a totalitarian government that conditions everyone to behave the same way is terrifying - this method of conditioning certainly wouldn't be limited to murderers and rapists. I don't know if it's possible to condition people the way Alex was conditioned, but the thought that such a technique might be possible is very unsettling.
I like how this movie makes us hate Alex and pity his victims, and then it makes us pity Alex himself. Alex is such an interesting and captivating character that we are fascinated by his every act and every thought, even though he's a detestable character. Since the movie completely revolves around Alex, no one would bother watching the movie if he was boring or annoying. You'll probably find Alex's jargon annoying at first (like "malchick", "viddy", "eggy-waygs", and so on) but you'll get used to it. Interestingly, we enjoy seeing Alex suffer UNTIL he returns home after his release from prison. And we pity him for the rest of the movie - UNTIL the movie's final scene. When Alex runs into his former victims, they each exact a measure of revenge on him. Even though we can understand why his victims are hurting him, we can't help but feel that they have no right to hurt him. It almost makes you appreciate our justice system, even though we always scream for harsher punishments. And did anyone notice how long McDowell's head was held underwater? You'd think Kubrick wanted to drown him.
What's the point of A Clockwork Orange? By now you should be thinking about how to balance the rights of criminals with society's right to protect itself from criminals. In order to guarantee the security of the vast majority, is it acceptable to force a tiny minority to live their lives devoid of joy, even if they become suicidal? No one wants a convicted murderer or child molester in their neighbourhood - but what's the proper way to deal with that situation? We may never know.
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars 2 stars for this dvd package, 5000 stars for the movie, March 11 2004
By 
first, the good stuff. the film and sound transfer is quite good. put it on the big screen, crank up the home theater and enjoy ludwig van and a little ultraviolence.
now, unfortunately, the bad. we all know that a clockwork orange is a fantastic movie. a disturbing movie. a somewhat hilarious movie at times. there's no denying or doubting that. the problem that i have is with the packaging and presentation given to this and all the "stanley kubrick collection" videos. first of all, there is a box set of these videos available, at no discernable discount. secondly, in typical warner fashion, the stanley kubrick collection is all packaged in the cheap, cardboard, snap-spine cases that i, and many people i know, have come to detest. there are no special features of note, other than the typical trailer throw in, although there is a short documentary on the shining, and one or two cast biographies sprinkled here or there.
honestly though, come on, films like a clockwork orange, full metal jacket, dr. strangelove, 2001: a space oddessey, and the shining deserve much better treatment than crappy cardboard cases and menus that look like they were developed by 9th grade computer classes. my girlfriend works in film post-production, took ONE three hour class in dvd construction and can make better menus than these on our home computer, WITHOUT editing software. these films desperately needed a bit more of a reverential touch than they got, and the shoddy workmanship displayed on these and many of warner's dvd releases is shameful. had kubrick, detail nut that he was, been alive for the release of these films on dvd, you can d*mn sure bet the quality would have been much better.
the least they could have done with this kind of cheap packaging was put them out at a bargain price.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Viddy well, droogie, May 29 2007
Although there are some notable differences between the novella and the film version, Kubrick's classic does preserve the main part of Burgess' message, though does so in a more tragic manner. Because of the unique dialogue used by Alex and his "droogis" (from the Russian drugi for "friends in violence"), an understanding of Nadsat (the "teen language" of the teen anti-hero and his friends), or multiple viewings can help in the understanding of the dialogue.
In essence, Clockwork Orange is a criticism of the emerging behaviourist and conditioning practices as a means of reforming troubled youths and so-called "criminals." Though both Kubrick and Burgess do maintain this as their main message, Kubrick does not preserve Alex's "self-reformation" which occurs in the 21st chapter of Burgess' book.
Still though, the dialogue, the soundtrack and the costumes are relatively consistent with the book version and Clockwork Orange costumes are still quite popular at Halloween and other costume parties.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Substance and Style!, July 19 2004
By 
Perhaps the greatest irony in "A Clockwork Orange" occurs in the scene where Alex is reading the Bible in prison. He informs the viewer that he loves the violence and sex contained in the first part, but really has no use for the preaching in the latter half. I've come across a lot of folks who have seen this flick and it never fails- there are many out there who, like Alex and the Bible, love the brutality of the first hour of the film, and cannot abide the preachy second half. If you are one of those, stop reading this review.
"A Clockwork Orange" is an ingenious comparison of two theories of punishment- retributivism and utilitarianism. Debate has raged over the proper role of a criminal justice system. Is the goal to punish the criminal according to the old eye for an eye standard (retributivism) or to reform the criminal into a useful, law abiding citizen (utilitarianism)? At the outset, many people dismiss utilitarian values as a lot of liberal silliness: soft on crime. A more important question is whether we should reform criminals whether they desire to be reformed or not for the good of society. One of the more interesting aspects of this film is that is shows utilitarianism can be a far more brutal method than retributivism, contrary to popular thought.
Here we have the debate crystallized as if the proponents of both, Kant and Bentham, were debating the merits before our very eyes through the characters on screen. Alex is unquestionably rotten to the core; he maims and rapes helpless victims for laughs. The first hour of the film is dedicated to underscoring this point. When Alex is apprehended by the authorities, he is dealt with in the old fashioned Kantian way- punishment.
Alex then volunteers for a special treatment that will "cure" him, in exchange for freedom. The cure is a form of conditioning that causes Alex to become terribly ill whenever any inclination towards sex or violence surfaces- he now has a reflexive aversion toward evil, and "ceases to be a being capable of moral choice". The final act of the film deals with the consequences of being "cured" in such a way.
By now you probably get the idea- go see this film (but not as a "date"). To further entice you, it's one of the most visually exciting movies ever made, with vibrant images that will burn themselves into your mind. If you've never seen it on DVD, the transfer is great, and you will see things you've missed before. And as a final bonus, look for the guy who plays Darth Vader as a bodyguard.
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A Clockwork Orange (2 Disc Special Edition) (Bilingual)
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