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12 of 12 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars The longest Harry Potter book gets whittled down to the shortest Harry Potter movie
I think that when you take the longest Harry Potter book and turn it into the shortest Harry Potter film, that a large number of complaints by fans as to what has been cut will be inevitable after they watch "Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix." Not that this means that the legions of fans will be bitterly disappointed by the film version, but rather that there...
Published on Dec 13 2007 by Amazon Customer

versus
2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars This one comes and goes!
Well, it seems that Harry Potter is now only a money-pumping machine! It has lost its style and its need to create long movies based on long books. Like you all know, this installement is the shortest, based on the longest book... That tells a lot. The fact that producers also change the director after only one movie also tells how Harry Potter has lost its soul...
Published on Dec 19 2007 by el_realisator


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12 of 12 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars The longest Harry Potter book gets whittled down to the shortest Harry Potter movie, Dec 13 2007
By 
Amazon Customer (The Zenith City, Duluth, Minnesota) - See all my reviews
(HALL OF FAME)    (TOP 500 REVIEWER)   
I think that when you take the longest Harry Potter book and turn it into the shortest Harry Potter film, that a large number of complaints by fans as to what has been cut will be inevitable after they watch "Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix." Not that this means that the legions of fans will be bitterly disappointed by the film version, but rather that there will be regrets over not getting to see favorite scenes on the screen. For example, Quidditch is completely out of the film, denying Ron of his best moments in the sun (start singing "Weasley is our king"). So do not be surprised when your mind keeps shifting to what has been cut and distracting you from time to time while watching this summer's latest blockbuster.

When last we left our hero, Harry fell victim to a trap to bring back Lord Voldermort, which cost Cedric Diggory his life. The Ministry of Magic wants things hushed up, but Dumbledore tells the students at Hogwarts that Diggory was murdered and Lord Voldermort murdered him. As this fifth film opens Harry and his wicked cousin Dudley are attacked by Dementors. Harry uses his wand to defend them and is summarily expelled from Hogwarts for using magic in front of a muggle. The good news is that Harry gets reinstated, but the bad news is that the Ministry of Magic uses the opportunity to appoint Dolores Umbridge, Senior Undersecretary at the Ministry, as the school's new Defense Against the Dark Arts professor. However, Umbridge teaches only the theory and not the practice because she insists Harry is a liar and there is nothing the students need to learn to defend themselves from. Then things get progressively worse.

"The Order of the Phoenix" was the most maddening book to read, not because it was the longest, but because I detest Dolores Umbridge. As far as I am concerned she makes Voldermort look good, because he knows he is evil, wicked, bad, mean, and nasty inside, while Umbridge thinks the ends justify the means. She is puritanical, sadistic and hypocritical. If there were not going to be children reading this review I would tell you what I really think of her. Suffice it to say, she makes me sick and I do not even take pleasure in loving to hate her, which is why my only requirement going into the film is that the Weasley Twins get their moment of glory when they become the disloyal opposition to the new order at Hogwarts.

Daniel Radcliffe continues to have the tote the heavy load in these films as Harry, with Rupert Grint's Ron Weasley being reduced more and more often to reaction shots while Emma Watson's Hermione Granger remains the Mistress of Exposition in these films. Alan Rickman as Snape remains pitch perfect casting and Gary Oldman as Sirius Black is also a joy to watch, but I discovered in this film that I really like Michael Gambon's performance as Dumbledore, mainly because he always plays up the character's intelligence and I find I prefer his interpretation to that of the late Richard Harris, forgive my heresy. Imelda Staunton does not look as much like a toad as Umbridge does in the book, but she captures the character's detestability from start to finish. We are always painfully aware how dangerous she is, whether she smiles or not. Also, Evanna Lynch steals more scenes as Luna Lovegood than Katie Leung does as Cho Chang, and it is certainly interesting to see Neville (Matthew Lewis) towering over everybody, with Ginny Weasley (Bonnie Wright) in the silent but strong role for the pivotal sextet.

After seeing this film in the theater I raced home and got out my copy of the book and starting cataloguing things that had been cut. Such comparisons are, as I suggested up top, inevitable for anyone who has read the book. At this point what I missed the most were some of the conversations between Maggie Smith's Professor McGonagall and Umbridge where Minerva verbally flaws the Inquisitor. The omission that I am focusing on the most is the whole bit about why Neville's family was a target of Voldermort (I agree with Harry: always say his name and thereby reduce its power), since that suggests implications for what will happen in the final book, which gets released in just ten more days. I also would have liked to have seen an over reaction to Harry discovering his father bullied Snape at Hogwarts. My favorite part ends up being the impressive wizard's duel between Voldermort and Dumbledore (although I do not understand how they get to do cast spells fast and furious without speaking the magic words). Screenwriter Michael Goldenberg does a good job of whittling down Rowling's book and director David Yates does a competent job, but fans will simply want more. Also, we now know what happens in the next book and Rowling's big finale so all of the bad things that happen in this film cannot help but seem inconsequential in comparison. At least now that the movie is out on DVD we can enjoy the film on its own and not be distracted by mining it for clues as to what was going to happen in the last book.
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11 of 12 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Incredible!, July 25 2008
By 
Jamieson Villeneuve "Author at Large" (Ottawa Ontario Canada) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
I was given Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix on DVD. My husband Robert gave it to me as a cheer up present. He went the extra mile and got me the special two disc edition, knowing that I am a Special Features Junkie.

I have three addictions in life. Four if you count Chocolate. But the first three are: Harry Potter, Books and Special Features. I love DVD extras. They really enable you to see what the film could have been, what was left out.

I think of them as little lost treasures, little bits of fun.

Now, having watched Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix, I can truly say that it is by far the best film in the series. It's fresh, engaging, moving, and beautiful. I loved watching it more the second time on DVD than I did when I saw it the first time.

This may have something to do with the fact that, in the theatre, there was a gentleman behind me that talked through the entire bloody thing. Or maybe because when I got to watch it at home, it was on a new twenty six inch screen; but I digress.

I was all excited to look at the Special Features after watching the film. The Husband (Hello Husband!) went off to do his thing. I popped in the second disc of the DVD, preparing myself to be enraptured.

Previous DVD editions of the movie have included games, maps, Triwizard Tournament Challenges, Potion Making Classes, a spidery maze, hidden extras and more. So imagine my surprise when I popped in the second DVD and saw a menu of only five things:

Languages, The Hidden Secrets of Harry Potter, Tour with Tonks and The Magic of Editing.

Measly fare at best. Where were the games, where were the extras, the fun stuff? Where were the Special Features that really helped me get behind the film. Nowhere I could see. I took a cursery glance through everything and announced it all tosh.

As it turned out, I was wrong. Very wrong indeed.

There are a lot of people out there writing bad reviews about the two disc special edition of the DVD and I was almost one of them, had I not taken the time to wait. Enjoying a day off today, I saw the DVD sitting there by my television and decided to pop it in.

I figured that I'd put on one of the features and it would be lovely, magical background noise as I cleaned the apartment and had a helping of my Husbands amazing meat loaf (seriously folks, it would make your mouth water; yep, it's that good).

That didn't happen at all.

I had already taken a quick look at The Magic of Editing Feature. A boring little documentary about editing a film. Watching television last night, I saw an add for the DVD where it mentioned being able to edit your own scene.

Hold on a second, edit my own what? I figured that since there was no other choice on the menu, The Magic of Editing would be where it was. So I watched the documentary. It was a revelation of what kind of work goes into giving us the film that we see. Quite enjoyable too.

At the end of this segment, you do actually get to edit your own scene, choosing camera angle, music and sound effects. Then comes the fun part: you get to play it back and watch what you put together.

It's like directing your own movie; sort of. I had a great time putting the scene together different ways. Just enjoy the Feature and then let the editing magic begin.

I was also prepared not to enjoy the additional scenes. I don't know why. I know it had a lot to do with my pre-conceived notions of the second disc not being enjoyable. So I pressed play and watched them.

I came away spellbound. It really is a shame that most of the scenes were cut from the final reels. They would have added warmth and depth to some of the performances, both small and large.

Emma Thompson in particular is amazing. There are a few more scenes with her: one in a comedic turn at the Welcome Feast that is worth the entire price of the DVD (I'm not kidding, she's that funny) and a later scene that concerns Divination.

She is surpurb as always but she really shines in these scenes, as she does in the actual film when Umbridge attempts to have her thrown out of Hogwarts. Imelda Staunton, who plays Professor Umbridge brilliantly in the film, has an extended scene right before she is accosted by the Centaurs.

Her speech is perhaps one of the best movie monologues that I have ever heard. It shows her depth of character, the depth of her evil, the depth of her desperation. Staunton gives one hell of a performance and it's a shame that it was cut from the movie.

We see a brief flash of Michael Gamdon as Dumbledore. We sense his lonliness, the separation between Dumbledore and Harry. It's brief but brilliant.

I can appreciate why the scenes were cut however, after having watched The Magic of Editing. The pieces, while wonderful, would have slowed down the original pace and tone of the film; it would have made the movie heavy. Being the shortest of the five movies, Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix flies along at a fantastic pace.

While Tour with Tonks was cute, I really did enjoy The Hidden Secrets of Harry Potter after I gave it a chance. Yes, the information is outdated, the effects kind of hokey, but it was perfectly enjoyable on a cold day with a bowl of popcorn.

I also understand why they've put it together. A large portion of the audience have read the books.

But a large portion of the movie audience hasn't. They've ingeniously weaved all the secrets that the reading audience have gained through the books and presented them all in a way suitable for those who have only watched the movies. It's a little flashy but wonderfully done.

All of these special features add to the film, add to the experience. They make the DVD worth having, contrary to those who would speak against it. I've had a thoroughly enjoyable world in the land of Harry Potter and I plan to return quite soon.

This is the perfect treat for your loved one; or for yourself for that matter. Just sit back, and enjoy. What could be better than that?
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4.0 out of 5 stars Finally....some magic!, Feb. 22 2011
By 
Paul Mackinnon (halifax, nova scotia, canada) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
The Order of the Phoenix. It's generally regarded as the worst of the franchise, I believe, but I was pleasantly surprised. I found the previous one very uneven, and kind of anti-climactic (the appearance of Voldemort was a letdown). I never really could follow what was happening in the triwizard tournament, or figure out why it was important. But this time, pure, dripping evil hung over the proceedings from the very first shot (Harry on the suburban playground). The spectre of Voldemort existed throughout the whole movie, even though we don't see him. The fact that he is "out there somewhere" was extremely dramatic. In fact, the whole film was more focused and dramatic. I liked the teen angst of the 4th film, but this time it took a backseat to the fact that the entire reality of the students was being subverted by a dictatorship government, refusing to believe in the existence of this evil dark lord. So, the students were trapped between two evils and forced to act on their own. Let the rebellion begin, indeed! Also, for the first time, Headmaster Dumbledore stopped being a guy who seemed to always be in maddening control, and became someone who was fighting for his very life. We saw his limitations, but also his power. I always had the sense that in the previous movies he was an all-knowing wizard who was just testing Harry (while staying in the background). This time he has to come to the front lines, to both attack the Ministry and Voldemort. Maybe its just my own sense of Churchill history, but was this whole story some sort of allegory for Churchill's fight in the 1930s against his own government, who refused to take the Nazi threat seriously enough? If so, I am more impressed with JK Rowling's storytelling abilities. Also, a word on the director. He was much maligned in reviews, but I thought he brought a certain panache to the story. It was grittier, but that seemed appropriate to the joyless story (I can understand Ebert's woe that the series grows darker with each tale. There was virtually no comic relief). It moved fast, no doubt the result of paring down a 600 page book. Many of the characters got perfunctory walk-ons. I was glad to see the return of Lupin and Sirius Black, but they didn't get much to do. It's a sign that I am beginning to care about the characters when I long for more scenes of dialogue between Black/Potter/Lupin, and less magic action. But, best of all, the showdown this time WAS grand. The duel between Voldemort and Dumbledore was reminiscent of the longing fans had to see Obi Wan and Anakin cross swords. Five films in anticipation, it did not disappoint, and it was the first time that the magic of this universe seemed like more than just silly spells. The battle, done without music, was the best special effects sequence of the whole series (a note on the effects, as a whole - they have been surprisingly poor throughout the whole series. Why is it that Potter, flying his broom above the Thames, looks worse than Christopher Reeve, in 1978's "Superman"? There's no excuse for that, for such a blockbuster).

This film represented the tipping point for me. To this point I'd liked two of the films, and was not crazy about the other two. This film not only stood on its own, but it redeemed the previous one, as a prelude to this one. Oddly, director Mike Newell, even with a focus on interpersonal relationships, missed a big opportunity with the character of Cederick Diggory, Potter's rival in the triwizard tournament. He meets a bad end in #4, but it's not until #5 that we even care about the guy, or appreciate the tragedy/inspiration that he represents.

As a book adaptation, perhaps the Order of the Phoenix disappointed. I expected a Hermoine/Ron relationship, but they had little to do here. As a film, picking up what is obviously a continuing story arc from film 4 to film 8, it works wonderfully. I think this has to be attributed to Yates, who will have helmed the final 4 films.

I, like a nerd, await the Half-Blood Prince, with great anticipation!
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4.0 out of 5 stars Redeems the series, Oct. 21 2009
By 
It's generally regarded as the worst of the franchise, I believe, but I was pleasantly surprised. I found the previous one very uneven, and kind of anti-climactic (the appearance of Voldemort was a letdown). I never really could follow what was happening in the triwizard tournament, or figure out why it was important. But this time, pure, dripping evil hung over the proceedings from the very first shot (Harry on the suburban playground). The spectre of Voldemort existed throughout the whole movie, even though we don't see him. The fact that he is "out there somewhere" was extremely dramatic. In fact, the whole film was more focused and dramatic. I liked the teen angst of the 4th film, but this time it took a backseat to the fact that the entire reality of the students was being subverted by a dictatorship government, refusing to believe in the existance of this evil dark lord. So, the students were trapped between two evils and forced to act on their own. Let the rebellion begin, indeed! Also, for the first time, Headmaster Dumbledore stopped being a guy who seemed to always be in maddening control, and became someone who was fighting for his very life. We saw his limitations, but also his power. I always had the sense that in the previous movies he was an all-knowing wizard who was just testing Harry (while staying in the background). This time he has to come to the front lines, to both attack the Ministry and Voldemort. Maybe its just my own sense of Churchill history, but was this whole story some sort of allegory for Churchill's fight in the 1930s against his own government, who refused to take the Nazi threat seriously enough? If so, I am more impressed with JK Rowling's storytelling abilities. Also, a word on the director. He was much maligned in reviews, but I thought he brought a certain panache to the story. It was grittier, but that seemed appropriate to the joyless story (I can understand the woe that the series grows darker with each tale. There was virtually no comic relief). It moved fast, no doubt the result of paring down a 600 page book. Many of the characters got perfunctory walk-ons. I was glad to see the return of Lupin and Sirius Black, but they didn't get much to do. It's a sign that I am beginning to care about the characters when I long for more scenes of dialogue between Black/Potter/Lupin, and less magic action. But, best of all, the Dumbledore/Voldemort showdown this time WAS grand. Five films in anticipation, it did not disappoint, and it was the first time that the magic of this universe seemed like more than just silly spells. The battle, done without music, was the best special effects sequence of the whole series (a note on the effects, as a whole - they have been surprisingly poor throughout the whole series. Why is it that Potter, flying his broom above the Thames, looks worse than Chrisopher Reeve, in 1978's "Superman"? There's no excuse for that, for such a blockbuster).

This film represented the tipping point for me. To this point I'd liked two of the films, and was not crazy about the other two. This film not only stood on its own, but it redeemed the previous one, as a prelude to this one. Oddly, director Mike Newell, even with a focus on interpersonal relationships, missed a big opportunity with the character of Cederick Diggory, Potter's rival in the triwizard tournament. He meets a bad end in #4, but it's not until #5 that we even care about the guy, or appreciate the tragedy/inspiration that he represents.

As a book adaptation, perhaps the Order of the Phoenix disappointed. I expected a Hermoine/Ron relationship, but they had little to do here. As a film, picking up what is obviously a continuing story arc from film 4 to film 8, it works wonderfully. I think this has to be attributed to Yates, who will have helmed the final 4 films.

I, like a nerd, await the Half-Blood Prince, with great anticipation!
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4.0 out of 5 stars [insert witty catchphrase here], Sept. 11 2008
To start things off, I love Harry Potter. There's so many complex plot lines woven together into a bigger plot that also connects many characters together. It's undeniably an epic tale, causing readers to actually believe in the existance of the wizarding world, which us Muggles unfortunately cannot enter, or even notice.

I watched this movie in IMAX when it was released, and I'm happy to say that the 3D sequence (the Thestral scene to the Fight with Death Eaters scene) was pretty amazingly done.

Helena Bonham Carter's portrayal of Bellatrix Lestrange was MINDBLOWING, too. She was absolutely PERFECT for the role, from the crazy laughter to the way her black-witch outfit looked stunning on her. The other adult actors, such as Alan Rickman, Ralph Fiennes, Gary Oldman, Jason Issacs, Maggie Smith... they were all awesome, as always. (Obviously, since they are very notable actors) Another newcomer was Luna Lovegood, and she was adorably dorky. Well played. Nymphadora Tonks had a short screentime, but she was pretty good too.

However... I can't say the same for Daniel Radcliffe. Admit it, we all died in Prisoner of Azkaban in that scene where Harry shouts the whole "HE KILLED MY PARENTS!" He LOOKS like Harry, but I'm sad to point out that his acting is not very good. Sirius's death scene SHOULD have reduced me to tears - Gary Oldman falling through the veil was breathtaking... until Harry started the whole "HE KILLED MY PARENTS!"-type of screaming, which was thankfully muted out, but we could all see his expression. And even the Grimmauld Place scene where he's mad at Ron and Hermione was terrible. Angst scenes are just not Daniel Radcliffe, I guess. (Daniel Radcliffe fans, please don't throw rocks at me...)

Onto a more positive note, the CGIs were pretty darn awesome. The Thestrals were well done, and so was the entire length of the Ministry of Magic scene.

Oh, and Umbridge was absolutely BLOODY ANNOYING, which was the way it was supposed to be. So that was good. But Michael Gambon's portrayal of Dumbledore... I think it's improved a bit since the whole "Harry Potter. Harry Potter? HARRY POTTTERRRRRR!!!!!!" thing from Goblet of Fire... (honestly people, that was NOT Dumbledore at all. The beard ponytail didn't help either.) Bits of the Dumbledore scenes were pretty bearable. (I mean, he IS a respectable actor... it's just Richard Harris's image of Dumbledore, and his voice, attire, the whole package, was TOO perfect and strong for me to get over him :( ) For example, in the Trelawney-gets-sacked scene, Dumbledore speaks calmly and quietly, the way he should... until he barks at the students, quite literally, "Well, you all have studying to do!!" (or something along that line)

Okay, I'm all out.

Basically, if you stuck with the movies before this, you should watch it. You'd know what to expect. This isn't the BEST installment so far, but it's not horrible.
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4.0 out of 5 stars [insert witty catchphrase here], Sept. 7 2008
Personally, I love Harry Potter. There's so many complex plot lines woven together into a bigger plot that also connects many characters together. It's undeniably an epic tale, causing readers to actually believe in the existance of the wizarding world, which us Muggles unfortunately cannot enter, or even notice.

I watched this movie in IMAX when it was released, and I'm happy to say that the 3D sequence (the Thestral scene to the Fight with Death Eaters scene) was pretty amazingly done.

Helena Bonham Carter's portrayal of Bellatrix Lestrange was MINDBLOWING, too. She was absolutely PERFECT for the role, from the crazy laughter to the way her black-witch outfit looked stunning on her. The other adult actors, such as Alan Rickman, Ralph Fiennes, Gary Oldman, Jason Issacs, Maggie Smith... they were all awesome, as always. (Obviously, since they are very notable actors) Another newcomer was Luna Lovegood, and she was adorably dorky. Well played. Nymphadora Tonks had a short screentime, but she was pretty good too.

However... I can't say the same for Daniel Radcliffe. Admit it, we all died in Prisoner of Azkaban in that scene where Harry shouts the whole "HE KILLED MY PARENTS!" He LOOKS like Harry, but I'm sad to point out that his acting is not very good. Sirius's death scene SHOULD have reduced me to tears - Gary Oldman falling through the veil was breathtaking... until Harry started the whole "HE KILLED MY PARENTS!"-type of screaming, which was thankfully muted out, but we could all see his expression. And even the Grimmauld Place scene where he's mad at Ron and Hermione was terrible. Angst scenes are just not Daniel Radcliffe, I guess. (Daniel Radcliffe fans, please don't throw rocks at me...)

Onto a more positive note, the CGIs were pretty darn awesome. The Thestrals were well done, and so was the entire length of the Ministry of Magic scene.

Oh, and Umbridge was absolutely BLOODY ANNOYING, which was the way it was supposed to be. So that was good. But Michael Gambon's portrayal of Dumbledore... I think it's improved a bit since the whole "Harry Potter. Harry Potter? HARRY POTTTERRRRRR!!!!!!" thing from Goblet of Fire... (honestly people, that was NOT Dumbledore at all. The beard ponytail didn't help either.) Bits of the Dumbledore scenes were pretty bearable. (I mean, he IS a respectable actor... it's just Richard Harris's image of Dumbledore, and his voice, attire, the whole package, was TOO perfect and strong for me to get over him :( ) For example, in the Trelawney-gets-sacked scene, Dumbledore speaks calmly and quietly, the way he should... until he barks at the students, quite literally, "Well, you all have studying to do!!" (or something along that line)

The movie also sort of twisted a bit of things, one thing being the fact that CHO rattled the DA out and not her friend... which was kind of weird, seeing that she liked Harry and shouldn't have betrayed him like that.

Okay, I'm all out.

Basically, if you stuck with the movies before this, you should watch it. You'd know what to expect. This isn't the BEST installment so far, but it's not horrible.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix is the best of the series!!, Jan. 7 2008
Harry Potter is faced with a dilemma. Voldermoort wants to control his mind and sets events in motion to undermine Hogwarts and to leave Harry Potter and his friends vulnerable. We see a different side to Snape and that explains why he is playing both sides. Only in the seventh book, do we learn exactly who Snape really is and that comes as a surprise. The movie focuses on a prophecy that spells the end of Voldermoort once and for all- but that's another story. Harry Potter and his friends are forced to learn magic on their own when Umbridge assumes control of Hogwarts and I enjoyed seeing her get what is coming in the forbidden forest.

The Order of the Phoenix is a huge improvement over the third film- which is my least favorite in the movie in the series.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Still Harry Potter, April 4 2008
By 
F. M. Polson (Canada) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This movie tended to drag at some points - not unlike the book. There was so much set up that had to happen before the confrontation with Voldemort that the movie suffered actionwise. However, I still enjoyed it because it is still Harry Potter and the story is fantastic. Though I recommend to read the book first so that you do understand some of the backstory and the extra lore around the prophecy. There was way too much information to cram into the movie; this no doubt will be the the most difficult transition of all the Harry Potter books.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Great edition for a great movie, Aug. 12 2014
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This ultimate edition of Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix is just great. Blu-ray picture and audio quality is excellent, both in the movie itself and in the documentary Creating the World of Harry Potter - Part 5.
Languages included for the movie are English, French and Spanish (both Castilian & Latin). The same applies to the subtitles.
Don't hesitate to buy this edition, it's worth the money!
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars This one comes and goes!, Dec 19 2007
By 
el_realisator (Montreal, Canada) - See all my reviews
Well, it seems that Harry Potter is now only a money-pumping machine! It has lost its style and its need to create long movies based on long books. Like you all know, this installement is the shortest, based on the longest book... That tells a lot. The fact that producers also change the director after only one movie also tells how Harry Potter has lost its soul.

I do not read the books, I don't care about them, but when I watched this movie, I felt it was missing something. It was empty, like a cake made entirely of icing... but no cake. Icing is good, but you need cake because you get tired of icing. This movie was 100% icing! I'm not kidding. I feel like this Harry Potter is completely irrelevant, it has no storyline at all and you fell like after the movie, you are at the same point as you were before, only with an angrier Harry who is about to pop and kill someone or start taking drugs!!

Lots of beautiful CGI of course and cheap and short apperances by characters who look like they should be more important, like Malfoy who appears to only be in 2 scenes and countless others who only get screentime to remind you that the actor still plays the character... kind of like Eugene Levy in the "American Pie presents ..."

Now I heared that David Yates is directing the 6th Potter movie, fingers crossed for it been longer and more interesting than cheap poppups of Voldemort and Harry freaking-out for 2 hours!

Like it started with the Goblet of Fire, there are two DVD editions, the one you can rent, with no bonus features at all and the 2-discs special edition complete with bonus features, only available to buy for $30

Of course, any fan of Harry Potter will get this one anyway so what can I tell you? Buy it, but get the 2-discs edition!
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