Customer Reviews


 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favourable review
The most helpful critical review


4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars For Real Comic Book Fans
Unbreakable is about the mythology behind comic book superheroes and the purposes that each of us have in life. The film opens with the birth of a baby boy with all four of his limbs broken. He is Elijah Price, who is played by Samuel L. Jackson, and he has type I OI or brittle bone disease. As his life goes on, he gets the nickname of "Mr. Glass" as up the point of...
Published on July 5 2007 by K. Driscoll

versus
1.0 out of 5 stars UNWATCHABLE!!!
I turned on UNBREAKABLE on tv last night to see what the big deal was about after I saw some commercial hyping a new M. Night Shyamalan movie THE VILLAGE with a promise of a trailer during UNBREAKABLE. I never got to made it to the THE VILLAGE trailer because UNBREAKABLE was unwatchable!
First of all, most train wrecks have survivors--lots of them--so one guy--in...
Published on May 4 2004 by B. h Grey


‹ Previous | 1 255 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars For Real Comic Book Fans, July 5 2007
This review is from: Unbreakable (Bilingual) (DVD)
Unbreakable is about the mythology behind comic book superheroes and the purposes that each of us have in life. The film opens with the birth of a baby boy with all four of his limbs broken. He is Elijah Price, who is played by Samuel L. Jackson, and he has type I OI or brittle bone disease. As his life goes on, he gets the nickname of "Mr. Glass" as up the point of present time in Unbreakable, Elijah had broken bones in his body 57 times. Elijah is motivated early on to socialize in some capacity by his mother and his primary interest becomes comic books. As he gets older he soon begins to question what the reason is for his own existence and comes to the conclusion that if people like him exist with his weakness, then surely there must be someone on the other end of the spectrum with massive strengths. Elijah believes there is nothing scarier than to live life without knowing your purpose and he makes the assertion that there are in fact real-life superheroes.

Bruce Willis plays David Dunn, a security officer, who, unlike Elijah, is trying to find his own purpose in life. He gave up his football career for his wife but now his marriage is falling apart. David survives a train wreck that kills 131 people, and he is the only survivor. He was completely unharmed. Elijah believes David to be a real superhero and gradually confronts David with his theory. David's son Joseph believes Elijah and assists David in finding out more about his potential powers. Just to add, I'm of the opinion that it is an absolute pleasure to watch Willis and Jackson act in pretty much anything.

As with any M. Night Shyamalan film, giving too much away is hugely detrimental to the experience and please know that this film is entirely worth going into with no more information then I have already provided. What Shyamalan has done here in retrospect, while considering the recent onslaught of big-budget comic book movies, is create a completely unconventional yet convincing adaptation of comic book heroes' origins. At the same time Unbreakable celebrates the mythology behind these fictional characters. It takes a profound imagination to come up with a screenplay that gives this concept the treatment that Shyamalan has. It is the kind of concept that might have taken almost a lifetime of brainstorming.

A friend of mine once said that the Sixth Sense was a gigantic and nearly perfect movie for absolutely everyone, while as a comic book fan Unbreakable was tailored made perfectly for him. Though I'm half the comic book fan he is, I concur with that assessment enough to confidently invoke it hear. If you truly love comic books, Unbreakable is your film. If you are not a lover of comic books, then try to walk into this film expecting little action and you shouldn't be disappointed.

It can be argued that Shyamalan has lost his way in recent years, although he does retain his technical prowess even now. Nevertheless, Unbreakable is still a joy to watch and is a shining example of Shyamalan during his most inspired and generative phase.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Interesting. Riveting. Chilling., Feb. 19 2004
By 
This review is from: Unbreakable (Bilingual) (DVD)
Capsule summary: Bruce Willis plays an ordinary man who does security work. After a devastating train accident somehow leaves him miraculously untouched, he is contacted by a mysterious man who tells him he may not be ordinary at all, but so extraordinary that he can no longer lead an ordinary life. The truth is even stranger, and more frightening, than it seems at first.
Review (with spoilers): It is a rare thing to come across anything NEW in either the thriller OR superhero genres. This combination of both manages to do so for both. We start with a young boy, Elijah Price who is born with a terrible medical curse: his bones are so brittle that they can break under any significant strain. To motivate him to at least try to make as much use of his body as he can, his mother buys him comic books which he likes and places them on the playground across the street; Elijah accepts the challenge, and the comic-book world within...
... Years later, a devastating train accident occurs, leaving security worker David Dunn (Bruce Willis) untouched though nearly everyone else is killed. Elijah, who now runs a collectibles store focused around comic memorabilia, contacts David. It seems that Elijah, because of his incredible fragility (for which the neighborhood children have nicknamed him "Mr. Glass"), formed a theory that the bell-curve distribution of human traits demanded that there be someone on the "opposite end" from him: someone virtually unbreakable, superhuman. Elijah (played as an adult by Samuel L. Jackson) is clearly somewhat nuts, yet there is a wierd and compelling power about him, and about the faith he has that there is a higher power motivating these events.
David does not accept this theory at once, but eventually other odd coincidences force him to at least test this nutcase's ideas... and the test results are everything that Elijah expects, stunning even David and his son.
In the end, David accepts that there is, in fact, some part of him driven to seek out and oppose true evildoers -- those who kill with pleasure and so on -- and in a dramatic sequence fights his first battle as a vigilante. Ironically, even though he does NOT go looking for some funny costume and tights, the outfit he wears works *AS* a superhero costume, even supplying him with an appropriate superheroic name: "Security".
BIG SPOILER WARNING, DO NOT READ ANY FARTHER IF YOU WANT ANY CHANCE TO WATCH THE REMAINDER OF THE FILM UNKNOWING
Some
Extra
Space
But the true shocker comes at the end, when we discover that, in order to FIND his superhero, Elijah has been CAUSING multiple disasters, winnowing through countless scenes of destruction to find the one unbreakable man or woman. The man we thought was playing "Professor X" to David's X-man life is, in fact, more akin to the Joker looking for his Batman. "Mr. Glass" could not be a superhero, so obviously he would have to be the villain -- and FIND a hero to oppose him.
Will David ever play Hero again? Despite this shock, we don't know. I would guess... yes. The ironic fact is that Mr. Glass *WAS* telling the truth. There IS a special power in David, one specifically there for finding those of true evil intent, and he truly does have a strong drive to act on it. But what a dark and sinister origin to have....
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Night's most original work to date remains ambiguous., Jan. 14 2004
By 
OverTheMoon (overthemoonreview@hotmail.com) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Unbreakable (Bilingual) (DVD)
M. Night Shyamalan has done three mainstream films. "The Sixth Sense" which is a rehash of a twist that we have seen before. "Signs" which is a homage to B-Movie films and "Unbreakable". Unbreakable is Night's most original piece but actually has no meaning and there is nothing to take away from this one at all. However there is plenty you can BRING to it because of the nostalgia of Superhero movies of the past. Night does all of that here in a modern day reworking of these themes which is played out with a hint of realism. This sort of gives it more appeal and makes it less fantastic and thus closer to reality. I will not tell you the plot or anything about it because it will ruin it for you. When released the film was based on a "man" who is the "soul-survivor" of a "trainwreck". There was no mention of Superheros when this film was released.
Now that it is tagged with that in the product description I think it is safe to say that this is a movie about a Superhero coming to terms with his own powers in the modern world. It is a good flick and well worth watching if you like the nostalgia of this theme. The film does work. The final twist does say ... "Unbreakable 2" but it is more or less there just to play with us a little and broaded the scope of the superhero theme. It is an interesting gimmick more than a plot twist here.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars What happened?, July 7 2004
By 
R. Whitelaw "Rebel Broker" (Morgan Hill, CA USA) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Unbreakable (Bilingual) (DVD)
Sadly, this movie was not a box office smash. And that, my friends, I just cannot figure out.
This movie is outstanding. Pure and simple. Its one of the few in my collection that I can go back to time and again and really enjoy watching.
The acting is excellent, the editing flows very well and the cinematography is great. Then there is the story and concept. Take comics and strip away the leotards, capes and unbelievable super powers and you end up with people who are amazing for believeable "powers". This concept is put into great contrast with the two main characters.
The only downside is that I think most folks will have the ending pegged before it comes around. But it remains an excellent story that is well told.
Sadly, since it did not bring in the profits it should have, we may never see a sequel or follow on effort.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars 3 1/2 stars? How could 607 people be so wrong?, Feb. 16 2004
By 
mattaca (Boston, MA, USA) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Unbreakable (Bilingual) (DVD)
While this movie is undoubtedly not the Sixth Sense, it's not supposed to be. In almost a completely different genre, Unbreakable focuses more on the dramatic than the suspenseful, and tell and an original and creative story in a compelling way. While the movie is slower than most, that's exactly the reason it succeeds in my mind. While most moviemakers would face the reality that moviegoers now EXPECT unbelieveable chase scenes, explosions, and impossible special effects, Shyamalan thankfully keeps the pace of the film consistent and eerily placid, providing the viewer with an uncommon viewing experience.
For those who didn't like it, I think it's only because they didn't have a slot to put it in. If you in a chill mood and have an open mind, this film will not only leave you satisfied, but thinking.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Twisted and dark, just the way I like it served., May 4 2004
By 
Alfredo Nudi "Cinema Lover" (Bradenton, Florida United States) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Unbreakable (Bilingual) (DVD)
There is no way to mark Unbreakable with a specific name of a kind a movie (Sorry about my wording I just woke up.)! Let me explain...In some ways you could call it a thriller, in some ways you could call it a mystery, you could also call it a sci-fi, but theres no way to specify the kind of movie it is. I first saw this on TV and I thought it was great...still do. Anyone who's into Signs or The Sixth Sense should definitely see this movie. Also go see "The Village" July 30, 2004 and check how GREAT that will be it looks really good. But thats basically all I can say about Unbreakable, its to hard to explain how great of a movie it is. You'll just have to see it for yourself! Over and out.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars A Very Real--and Well Done--Superhero Origin Movie, April 22 2015
Ordinary David Dunn (Bruce Willis) has a failing marriage, a son who needs him, and a job as a security guard. However, all that changes after a severe train wreck and he is the only survivor. Even more miraculous, he is completely unharmed. When confronted by a man named Elijah Price (Samuel L. Jackson), who suggests David is invulnerable, David shrugs it off but eventually begins to test himself and discovers that maybe he’s not that ordinary after all and soon learns he can do things no other man can. At Elijah’s insistence, David explores his abilities even more and soon begins a journey that reveals maybe he is indeed unbreakable.

I’ve said it before and I’ll say it again: I love superhero origin stories and Unbreakable is just that. Written and directed by M. Night Shyamalan of Sixth Sense fame, Unbreakable is a story deconstructing the superhero, and suggesting a possible real life origin for these amazing people, while keeping your interest from start to finish.

Using the real-life medical condition osteogenesis imperfecta as a springboard, suggesting that if someone with such frail bones can exist, is it not possible someone with unbreakable bones—even body—can exist? And thus is the story as we follow Elijah Price as he searches out this amazing possibility in the person of David Dunn.

This movie also heavily references comic books, Elijah posing the idea that comic books are modern day retellings of stories of times past and of real people who once were able to do things other people couldn’t.

Each moment of this movie is an in-depth look at what makes the superhero tick, everything from the discovery of his power, to his motivation in using it, to the doubt that such a possibility could exist in a person, to finding a possible weakness, to balancing having this special ability with the demands of everyday life, and more.

This movie is a drama and not an action flick. While there is some action, namely toward the end, it’s a life and times superhero story that makes you stop and think about what being a person with an extraordinary ability might actually be like, if it would be easy or hard, or a bit of both. What kind of challenges would you face? What kinds of benefits?

Apparently, M. Night Shyamalan came up with the idea following the standard three-part structure of a superhero story: the origin, the rise to being a hero, then the final confrontation with the villain. The movie has all these elements, but because he found it the most interesting, Shyamalan spends most of the time focusing on the origin. As a result, there is such depth surrounding David Dunn and Elijah Price that as the hero and villain, they rival characters that have been around for decades in terms of richness. Very well done.

This movie is just so, so good and is one of my all-time favorites. It’s one of those flicks to throw on on a rainy day, get under a blanket, and get swept up in the world of the superhero only to be inspired to look for the spectacular in one’s own self.

Highly recommended.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4.0 out of 5 stars Unbroken, Jan. 12 2008
By 
EA Solinas "ea_solinas" (MD USA) - See all my reviews
(HALL OF FAME)    (TOP 50 REVIEWER)   
Hit show "Heroes" became a big hit with the premise "what if ordinary people found that they had superpowers?" B

ut they weren't the first to use that -- M. Night Shyamalan tackled in in "Unbreakable," an intensely geeky, eerie thriller about a man who discovers that he is a superhuman. It's full of solid acting and writing, but has a big fat letdown of an ending.

A train derails, killing everyone on board -- except everyman David Dunn (Bruce Willis), who survives without a scratch. As he tries to deal with this, he is contacted by crippled comic book dealer Elijah Price (Samuel L. Jackson), whose "glass" bones made him speculate: what if there were people at the opposite end of the spectrum -- real superheroes with great strength and powers, REAL "men of steel"?

Realizing that he has never been sick or endangered (except when exposed to water), David begins to explore his newly-discovered strength and second sight, despite the harm it does to his fragile marriage, even saving others from criminals. But there's a sinister side to his discovery and the accident that caused him to explore his powers...

"Superhero movie" usually makes you think of loads of colourful action and young hunky heroes. But Shyamalan takes the opposite approach -- a middle-aged Everyman hero with wife and kid, and the movie is cloaked in shadowy camerawork, not much action at all and eerie, overquiet dialogue. Still it's very geeky, and very intelligent.

Instead of action, "Unbreakable" devotes itself to the mythic qualities of superheroes, and David's slow awakening to his own abilities. Rather than his usual suspense, Shyamalan uses atmosphere to keep the plot captivating, giving it the feeling of a creepy intense dream. And since every superhero has to fight the baddies, he weaves in some tightly-choreographed, grimy fight sequences as David finally makes use of his superstrength.

So what's the problem? Quite simply, the ending is a huge letdown -- while rationally it makes sense, David's actions at the climax leave you feeling, "That's it? That's all the 'unbreakable man' is going to do? What the?" And somehow it feels odd that a "supervillain" wouldn't really have any superabilities (or compensation for them) himself. Slight stumble there.

Bruce Willis gives an excellent, understated performance as David, who longs for an indefinable something in his life, and slowly grows to realize that he is "unbreakable." Nice ordinary guy who turns out to be very extraordinary. But Jackson is even better as Elijah Price -- intense, passionate, and somewhat detached from the real world. His powerful personality balances out his frail body.

Shyamalan goes into comic-book geek mode in in "Unbreakable," a slow-moving, suspenseful movie about a hero's awakening... that only stumbles in the final scenes.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4.0 out of 5 stars Unbroken, April 22 2007
By 
EA Solinas "ea_solinas" (MD USA) - See all my reviews
(HALL OF FAME)    (TOP 50 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: Unbreakable (Bilingual) (DVD)
Currently hit show "Heroes" is riding high with the premise "what if ordinary people found that they had superpowers?" But they weren't the first to use that -- M. Night Shyamalan tackled in in "Unbreakable," an eerie thriller full of solid acting and writing, but a big fat letdown of an ending.

A train derails, killing everyone on board -- except everyman David Dunn (Bruce Willis), who survives without a scratch. As he tries to deal with this, he is contacted by crippled comic book dealer Elijah Price (Samuel L. Jackson), whose "glass" bones made him speculate: what if there were people at the opposite end of the spectrum -- real superheroes with great strength and powers, REAL "men of steel"?

Realizing that he has never been sick or endangered (except when exposed to water), David begins to explore his newly-discovered strength and second sight, despite the harm it does to his fragile marriage, even saving others from criminals. But there's a sinister side to his discovery and the accident that caused him to explore his powers...

"Superhero movie" usually makes you think of loads of colourful action and young hunky heroes. But Shyamalan takes the opposite approach -- a middle-aged Everyman hero with wife and kid, and the movie is cloaked in shadowy camerawork, not much action at all and eerie, overquiet dialogue. Still it's very geeky, and very intelligent.

Instead of action, "Unbreakable" devotes itself to the mythic qualities of superheroes, and David's slow awakening to his own abilities. Rather than his usual suspense, Shyamalan uses atmosphere to keep the plot captivating, giving it the feeling of a creepy intense dream. And since every superhero has to fight the baddies, he weaves in some tightly-choreographed, grimy fight sequences as David finally makes use of his superstrength.

So what's the problem? Quite simply, the ending is a huge letdown -- while rationally it makes sense, David's actions at the climax leave you feeling, "That's it? That's all the 'unbreakable man' is going to do?" And somehow it feels odd that a "supervillain" wouldn't really have any superabilities (or compensation for them) himself.

Bruce Willis gives an excellent, understated performance as David, who longs for an indefinable something in his life, and slowly grows to realize that he is "unbreakable." But Jackson is even better as Elijah Price -- intense, passionate, and somewhat detached from the real world. His powerful personality balances out his frail body.

Shyamalan goes into comic-book geek mode in in "Unbreakable," a slow-moving, suspenseful movie about a hero's awakening... that only stumbles in the final scenes.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4.0 out of 5 stars GREAT MOVIE, July 2 2004
This review is from: Unbreakable (Bilingual) (DVD)
I agree that this could've been much better but it is still a great movie overall. This movie was written, produced, and directed by M. Night Shyamalan (Signs, The Sixth Sense). The main characters in this movie are David Dunn (Bruce Willis) and Elijah Price (Samuel L. Jackson). David is in a terrible train accident and he is the sole survivor without a single scratch on him. He then meets Elijah who thinks David is a hero. Specifically he thinks David's a comic book hero. Elijah tries to convince David and his family that he is a hero while David tries to remember his past. David remembers that he never was sick and he never had a broken bone which leads him to thinking he is a hero which then he becomes frustrated and doesn't really know what to think of at all.
The ending was surprising but you could kind of see it coming. I thought the ending was going to be really great but it turned out just to be good.
There are about an hour of special features on the second disc, which are great, but I was hoping there was more.
Special Features:
-Behind the Scenes with Bruce Willis (15 minutes)
-Comic Book and Superheroes with Samuel L. Jackson (20 minutes)
-The Train Station Sequence multi angle
-A short film from M. Night Shyamalan (3 minutes)
-7 Deleted Scenes all introduced by M. Night Shyamalan (30 minutes):
Elijah taken Away
Audrey in waiting room
David in shower
Elijah at fair
David with priest
Audrey calls David
Weightlifting in locker room
I figured they could have put a couple of the deleted scenes in the movie especially David with priest and Elijah at fair.
Overall this movie was great and I am glad to own it. If you were a fan of Sixth Sense I recommend this. It isn't scary or anything like that but you do have to pay attention to it to finally get it at the end. It really comes together when you get it then you enjoy the movie more.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


‹ Previous | 1 255 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

This product

Unbreakable (Version française) [Blu-ray]
Unbreakable (Version française) [Blu-ray] by M. Night Shyamalan (Blu-ray - 2008)
CDN$ 19.99
In Stock
Add to cart Add to wishlist
Only search this product's reviews