Customer Reviews


59 Reviews
5 star:
 (34)
4 star:
 (16)
3 star:
 (9)
2 star:    (0)
1 star:    (0)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favourable review
The most helpful critical review


3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars If you listen to fools...!
The entire Dio-era catalogue of Sabbath has now been reissued so many bloody times. First there was the original CD issues, then the Castle remasters in 1996, then the Dio years boxed set, and now these deluxe editions. I'm feeling lightly pillaged. But buying these is optional...unless you're a die-hard like me. If you're not, stick to the Dio box. If you are a...
Published on Feb. 22 2011 by LeBrain

versus
3.0 out of 5 stars Did they rush things? I think so...
Black Sabbath's "Heaven and hell" (1980) was a real masterpiece and clearly one of the finest heavy metal albums of all time. The follow up "Mob rules" from 1981 isn't equally good and that's not surprising. Even 'tho the production as well as the quality in material is inferior to "Heaven and hell" there's good moments on "Mob rules". The opening rocker "Turn up the...
Published on May 23 2003 by L. B. Ivarsson


‹ Previous | 1 26 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars If you listen to fools...!, Feb. 22 2011
By 
LeBrain - See all my reviews
(HALL OF FAME)    (TOP 50 REVIEWER)   
The entire Dio-era catalogue of Sabbath has now been reissued so many bloody times. First there was the original CD issues, then the Castle remasters in 1996, then the Dio years boxed set, and now these deluxe editions. I'm feeling lightly pillaged. But buying these is optional...unless you're a die-hard like me. If you're not, stick to the Dio box. If you are a die-hard, plunge forward.

The big reason to buy this box is the Live at Hammersmith bonus disc. Folks, when Rhino announced this live album I jumped on it immediately. It was sold out immediately, a handful of copies. Limited and numbered, even if it sucked it was bound to be worth a fortune in the future right? Well not necessarily. Now it's been included as a bonus disc. So, for me this sucks -- my Rhino issue is no longer as desirable to collectors. For you, it's awesome. Now you can have this blistering live album, way better than Live Evil!

All the other expected perks are here, including bonus tracks (the soundtrack version of the title track, and a B-side from a 12" single) and liner notes. Throw in some photos and a great remastering job, and you have (hopefully!) the last copy of Mob Rules that you will ever need to buy.

Mob Rules itself is very much a brother record to Heaven & Hell. You have that big dramatic epic ("The Sign of the Southern Cross") the speedy opener ("Turn Up The Night") and everything else in between ("Voodoo"). It's not quite up to the lofty standards of H&H, although it does try to follow the blueprint quite closely. I find the closer ("Over & Over") to be the weak link in an otherwise pretty damn strong chain.

Pick it up to help complete your Sabbath collection, and to hear the awesome Live At Hammersmith.

5 stars!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Not as good as Heaven And Hell, but still excellent, May 27 2004
This review is from: Mob Rules (Audio CD)
Mob Rules (1981.) Black Sabbath's tenth album.
Many fans of Black Sabbath, and possibly the band members themselves, must have thought that Ozzy's departing the band would have ruined them for sure. Obviously, many fans instantly rejected the incarnations the band that lacked Ozzy. But those fans of the band who had open minds quickly discovered that Ronnie James Dio was a great vocalist, and that he was every bit as talented as Ozzy was - a point he beautifully demonstrated in his last band, Rainbow, and on his first album with Sabbath, Heaven And Hell. For the second album with Dio, drummer Bill Ward left the band. He was replaced by new drummer Vinnie Appice (brother of the legendary Carmine Appice, of Vanilla Fudge and Cactus fame.) How does the band's second effort with Dio, Mob Rules, measure up? Read on and find out.
Is Mob Rules as good as Heaven And Hell? Not in my eyes, although there are many fans of the band that would beg to differ. I think that this is an EXCELLENT album, but Heaven And Hell is a masterpiece of unparalleled quality. Still, Mob Rules is no slouch in the quality department. Turn Up The Night is the kind of fast-paced hard rock you'd expect Ronnie James Dio to shell out. In all his years of music, Dio has proven that he can do songs like this better than just about everyone else out there. He'd continue to prove this point tirelessly in his solo career, which was just around the corner. Another excellent rocker present is Voodoo, on which Tony Iommi shells out some damn fine riffs - but would you expect anything less from this guy? But, by far, the masterpiece of this album is the lengthy and melodic Sign Of The Southern Cross. With their reputation as the "first real metal band", it's not surprising that fans overlook the stuff that isn't as heavy. And that's a real shame. I pity the people that overlook this stuff; it's some of the band's best material. And, of course, who could overlook the awesome title track? The title track on a Sabbath album is, more often than not, one of its best tracks of all, and on Mob Rules, there's no exception to the rule. You may be wondering why I only gave the album four stars instead of five. The answer is simple. Some of the songs just fall below Sabbath's usual standard. For example, E5150 is just weird electronic stuff - WAY out of character for Sabbath. Likewise, the last few tracks on the album, while good, aren't up to the quality of some of the masterpieces the band has released over the years. In the end this is a solid album, though.
THE TEXT IN THIS PARAGRAPH REFERS EXCLUSIVELY TO THE WARNER BROS. AMERICAN REISSUE OF THE ALBUM. Warner Bros. did a fine job remastering and rereleasing the Black Sabbath catalogue, as did they several other artists. Unfortunately, they didn't really do anything outside of improving the sound quality. You don't get expanded liner notes, interviews, bonus tracks, or anything. It's kind of a disappointment, but it doesn't change my views on the album itself.
No, Mob Rules isn't as good as Heaven And Hell. But, of course, what is? Through and through, though, this is a solid album. Following its release, the band would release a live album entitled Live Evil, but a dispute over its mixing would lead to Ronnie James Dio and Vinnie Appice leaving the band to start up Dio's solo band. Drummer Bill Ward would return, and the band would recruit new vocalist Ian Gillan of Deep Purple fame. Should you buy Mob Rules? For lack of a better word, yes.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Black Sabbath lives, June 30 2004
This review is from: Mob Rules (Audio CD)
1st of all like someone already said, how do you replace Ozzy Osbourne? Well luckily Dio is a legend, he's been around forever. I was never nuts about the Elf stuff, but I did like his Rainbow material. I thought this release was a breath of fresh air, the last sabbath release "never say die" was weak. It had 2 good songs maybe, never say die & johnny blade.
The 1st half of The Mob Rules is great, all fast past heavy songs, the next half imo is all filler material. Turn up the night, voodoo, sign of the southern cross, & E5150 are instant classics.
No one has mentioned the cover of this cd, look at the bloody cloth closely....it's a demoms face. Cool huh???? One last thing why are people saying E5150 is way out of character for sabbath?? It's not, Ever heard the song "Who are you"?? Check it out.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4.0 out of 5 stars Better than "Heaven & Hell", Jan. 18 2004
By 
Michael Pope (Clinton, MS United States) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Mob Rules (Audio CD)
I know what they're going to say: "There's no way 'Mob Rules' is better than 'Heaven & Hell'". Let me explain.
Simply put, "Mob Rules" is a harder, more edgy effort than "Heaven & Hell". The album opens with a fast, churning rocker, "Turn up the Night". We then move into a more "typical" Sabbath sound with the bluesy "Voodoo". The third piece is one of the best on the album: "The Sign of the Southern Cross". It's an epic worthy of a Black Sabbath Greatest Hits album. It also shows Dio's voice as we'll never hear it again on any other effort - Soft, serene, soothing (only to be shattered by a strategically placed power chord to introduce the rest of the band). E5150 is, well, dumb - and the low point of the album. I'm not sure what Sabbath was toying with here, but I do know that "5150" is the American Police Code for the criminally insane. The title track is the hardest song on the album, and another one of my faves. Also a contribution to the soundtrack for 1981's "Heavy Metal: The Movie", "The Mob Rules" makes you want to really stand up and shout (no pun intended). I call the next two songs, "Country Girl" & "Slipping Away", twin songs for obvious reasons. Though many fans overlook these two, I really like the blues-metal, foot-stomping "Slipping Away". It comes complete with guitar rests to show off Vinny Appice's drumming, & an echo effect on Dio's vocals for some added attitude. This song also shows a glimpse of some chops from Geezer Butler & Tony Iommi. I don't think the album ends well with the last two cuts, "Falling Off the Edge of the World" & "Over and Over". These last two songs sound much like an afterthought, and as a result, they are rather forgettable.
The album cover is one of the best "traditional" heavy metal covers I've seen, whose hooded figures look like inner city dregs stalking thier next victim. Martin Birch's production is clean and crisp, especially for the 1980's.
On the downside, E5150 is a waste of time & the last two cuts are weak. I wish the CD had photos and lyrics...
After listening to this album, (I know this may be blasphemy to some) I think Dio-era Sabbath is better than the traditional line-up with Ozzy. Either way, the album is a must have for any fans of the "Golden Age" of traditional heavy metal.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars "22 Year Old Sabbath Masterpiece with Dio!, Oct. 5 2003
By 
Alex Shuris (Princeton, MA. (USA)) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Mob Rules (Rm) (Audio CD)
Eventhough this album was released some 22 years ago, "Mob Rules" stands as one of Black Sabbath's best albums without the aid of Ozzy Osbourne. Ronnie James Dio does a great job on vocals, and presents a much more interesting vocal range than anything Ozzy put out in the 1970's. The tracks "Turn Up the Night", "The Sign of the Southern Cross", and "The Mob Rules" are the obvious hits, but who could forget "Country Girl", "Over & Over", & "Falling Off the Edge of the World."
These songs really rock, and illustrate the talents of Geezer Butler, Tony Iommi, Vinny Appice, and Dio. "Heaven & Hell (1980)" released 2 years earlier was also good, but not great.
Many of it's songs were filler, but "Mob Rules" is a consistant and enjoyable album from beginning to end. Anyone who enjoys Black Sabbath, Dio, Rainbow, and early Ozzy, will love this CD for it's heaviness on such tunes as "Voodoo" or it's non-stop rockers like the title cut "The Mob Rules."
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars The Sign of Greatness, Sept. 15 2003
By 
This review is from: Mob Rules (Audio CD)
Destined to be overshadowed by it's predecessor, the immensely popular (and deservedly so) HEAVEN AND HELL, Dio's second effort with the band is actually one of the most underrated and under-appreciated album in Black Sabbath's canon. I would even try to argue that MOB RULES is just as good, if not a little bit better at times, than HEAVEN AND HELL.
The main credit to this album's success is that it maintains its brilliance all the way though... HEAVEN AND HELL is a great album, no doubt, but the album's best and most memorable songs are tagged onto the front of the album, with the last song on it being the worst on the album (still good, but not fantastic). Not so with MOB RULES... every song on this album is absolutely fantastic, with no slip in quality whatsoever.
"Turn up the Night" is what we've come to expect from Dio... an upbeat and fast-paced metal song with infectious harmonies and wailing vocals. "Voodoo" is a nice mid-paced rocker with some impressive riffs to its credit. "The Sign of the Southern Cross" is without a doubt the masterpiece of the album, and the best song Dio ever did (Sabbath and otherwise). An epic that clocks in at 7:49, it's an undeniable highpoint in the band's career... nothing that Sabbath did afterwards even comes close to matching it.
The band does some experimenting with "E5150," which I guess you could compare to VOLUME 4's "FX," SABOTAGE'S "Don't Start (Too Late)" or any other tinkerings the band did throughout its career. The title track is another instant classic, and when the band slows things down in the middle of the otherwise heavy "Country Girl," you can't help but be impressed. Out of the last three songs (all of them amazing songs), the incredibly catchy "Falling Off The Edge of the World" comes across as the best...
If you haven't picked this up for some crazy reason, drop what you're doing and do so immediately. Not to put down anything that Dio did in his solo career (which was much better than Ozzy's, by the way), MOB RULES is perhaps the best thing that he was ever associated with. It's an unsung classic in the metal community, and an essential release. One of the very best...
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


3.0 out of 5 stars Did they rush things? I think so..., May 23 2003
By 
L. B. Ivarsson (Rock City) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Mob Rules (Audio CD)
Black Sabbath's "Heaven and hell" (1980) was a real masterpiece and clearly one of the finest heavy metal albums of all time. The follow up "Mob rules" from 1981 isn't equally good and that's not surprising. Even 'tho the production as well as the quality in material is inferior to "Heaven and hell" there's good moments on "Mob rules". The opening rocker "Turn up the night" is rather similar to later songs by Ronnie James Dio, like "Evil eyes". It also reminds of "Neon knights" and "Wishing well" from the "Heaven and hell" album, but hasn't quite the same quality. "Country girl" have a similar structure to early Rainbow songs, and could easily have been on the album "Ritchie Blackmore's Rainbow". "Voodoo" stand out a bit and I wouldn't be surprised if Jake E Lee (ex Ozzy Osbourne) listened a lot to this song while recording the second Badlands album, funnily called "Voodoo highway". Songs like "The mob rules" and "Slipping away" is nothing to be excited about because they are of rather average standard. Tony Iommi has always had a thing for meaningless instrumental tunes and "E5-150" is another one. Personally I find the epic "The sign of the southern cross" and "Falling off the edge of the world" to be the most interesting songs on this album. Both are built the same way and they are both soft and heavy at the same time. Especially the later clearly bare connection to earlier efforts from Dio (like "Gates if babylon") but doesn't reach the same heights. I guess "Mob rules" was forced in a way and came too soon after "Heaven and hell".
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars Dio Sabbath Part II, March 29 2003
By 
A.J. Taylor (Sparta, NJ United States) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Mob Rules (Audio CD)
After 1980's successful Heaven&Hell, Black Sabbath continued down an almost identical path for its follow-uo, 1981's Mob Rules. The album is a near exact copy of H&H, but when the music is this good I'm not gonna complain. Ronnie James Dio's vocals remain strong(indeed his voice is far superior to Ozzy's) and he continues to lead the band effectively. Tony Iommi's guitar work is great, just as in H&H(somewhere between Ozzy and Dio his guitar style changed totally, and this change fits Dio's vocal style perfectly). Geezer Butler lays some good rythems on bass, espescially on Voodoo. New drummer Vinny Appice is no Bill Ward, but still a very good skin-pounder.
The songs themselves are great again(with the exception of the odd E5150) with epics(Sign of the Southern Cross), mid paced tracks(Voodoo, Country Girl) and all-out heavy metal(Turn Up the Night, Mob Rules).
Black Sabbath would never be quite as good after Dio's departure in late 1982. Mob Rules represents Black Sabbath at their Dio-era peak, and one is left to wonder about what they might have gone on to do had he and Tony Iommi not had a falling out.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars Rock 'n' Roll done right, Feb. 25 2003
By 
Michel Aaij (Montgomery, AL) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Mob Rules (Audio CD)
I am sure glad to see I'm not the only one to prefer this over "Heaven and Hell," the first Sabbath with Ronnie James Dio. That was a good album, but this is better--in fact, this is really, really good.
I've always found the drum and bass on Sabbath albums a bit sluggish, and while it always seemed to match the dark brooding songs, Vinnie Appice is a bit more energetic and I like that. The real star, though, is Tony Iommi, who is at his best on this album, whether on the slower tunes like "Sign of the Southern Cross" or the faster ones like "The Mob Rules"--wait, that is the only up-tempo song on the album, if you don't count "Slipping Away," which is a throwaway standard rocker.
Someone on this page mentioned Dio's 'Dungeons and Dragons' thematics, and they were right. But I can live with it, it doesn't bother me too much, and fortunately Dio has the register and the volume to pull it off. Tenacious D may have claimed to have taken the torch from RJD, but they can't touch the vocals on this album.
I honestly can't tell if my CD is remastered (so it probably isn't), but I can tell you that it sounds great--sure you can do rock and roll using all the perks of studio equipment. Twenty-two years old now, "Mob Rules" stands as a classic, not as a replacement for the old Sabbath, but on its own. Bravo Martin Birch, bravo Sabbath--long live rock and roll.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4.0 out of 5 stars The Mob Rules - Der Kommissar's Definitive Review, Jan. 8 2003
This review is from: Mob Rules (Audio CD)
Dio's first album with Black Sabbath, Heaven And Hell, was a masterpiece - no questions asked. The follow-up effort, The Mob Rules, proved to be more of the same. The line-up consists of the following members
Tony Iommi - Guitar (The ONLY person to play on EVERY Sabbath album)
Geezer Butler - Bass
Ronnie James Dio - Vocals
Vinnie Appice - Drums (New drummer, he replaced Bill Ward. After this album he followed Dio out of the band to form Dio.)
Now, onto the album itself. Overall the style used here isn't too different from that of Heaven And Hell, though the material isn't quite as unique, and the album seems redundant at times. At times it even seems like some of the songs are rehashes of songs from the previous album. This isn't to say it's not a good album though. For example, Turn Up The Night is a fast-paced melodic rocker that is unquestionably reminiscent of Neon Knights, the track that started Heaven And Hell. The Sign Of The Southern Cross is slow and soft in the verses, and hard and melodic in the chorus. It fades into the most unique track on the album E5150. This is an instrumental that uses many bizzare instrumental effects. The title track and Country Girl are melodic hard rockers that certainly won't fail to please. The other tracks on here are also excellent as well.
My final verdict? If you only get one Dio-Sabbath album, get Heaven And Hell. This is an excellent album, certainly worthy of four stars, but Heaven And Hell is five-star material all the way, and in my opinion superior to this album. This is NOT a bad album though, and any Black Sabbath or Ronnie James Dio fan would be doing a smart thing to purchase it.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


‹ Previous | 1 26 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

This product

Mob Rules
Mob Rules by Black Sabbath (Audio CD - 2008)
Add to cart Add to wishlist
Only search this product's reviews