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on April 16, 2003
So here it is, the movie �debut� of Eminem, the man once referred to by President Bush as 'the most dangerous threat to American children since polio'. Directed by Curtis Hanson (previously responsible for the excellent LA Confidential), Marshall Mathers III stars as Jimmy �B. Rabbit� Smith, a wannabe rapper struggling to break of a life of poverty on the wrong side of Detroit�s 8 Mile Road.
8 Mile opens with B. Rabbit about to go on stage to take part in an open mic rap contest at a rap venue called �The Shelter�. Plagued by nerves, he throws up in the bathroom and down his sweater before going on stage, where in front of a cynical and somewhat hostile back audience he completely dries up in an embarrassing case of stage fright. Homeless and car-less after splitting up with his �pregnant� girlfriend he has to return to his mother�s trailer home, whereupon he disturbs his mother (Kim Basinger) mid-coital with her younger lover Greg. As if that is not embarrassing enough his mother later confides to a horrified Rabbit that she is having problems with her sex life because Greg wont go down on her.
Almost everything in 8 Mile suggests that this is less than fiction and whilst perhaps not quite autobiographical it is certainly quasi-autobiographical. Much like a pre-superstardom Eminem, his character Jimmy has an absentee father, he hangs around with a multiracial crew and takes part in rapping competitions. Jimmy�s mother is a drunken fool neglecting her four-year old daughter, whilst living with a no-good loser virtually the same age as her son, in a squalid trailer. Jimmy�s crew dream of becoming rap stars and see their rhyming skills as being their best hope of getting out of the inner city deprivation and urban wasteland of America�s famous motor city. However, whilst dreaming of a way out of the urban wasteland and poverty that surrounds him Rabbit still has to work a day job in a steel pressing plant where his boss gives him a hard time for his time-keeping and attitude.
Eminem is not just the most famous rapper in America, he is quite simply the biggest star on the planet. In the superstardom stakes he is, if you will pardon the comparison, the new Michael Jackson (without the chimp, the plastic surgery, the dance moves and with a great deal more profanity). Of course 8 Mile isn't actually Eminem�s film debut; that was in The Wash, Dr Dre and Snoop Dogg's ill-conceived remake of the 70�s flick �Car Wash�, where he made a cameo appearance as a phone-stalker psycho. As The Wash proved, rap artists don�t necessarily make great actors or great films (remember Vanilla Ice in the cringeworthy Cold As Ice anyone?) and with the exception of Ice Cube and Tupac Shakur, very few have actually made the transition from music to movies as well as this.
Perhaps not an obviously heroic figure Eminem's public persona has been somewhat modified in his role as Jimmy �Rabbit� Smith. Jimmy�s actions are anti-homophobic (he comes to the defence of one of his gay colleagues), he is positively passive (rather than verbally violent) to all the women in his life regardless of how much they wrong him. Indeed the movie opens with Rabbit having given his car and home away to his ex-girlfriend who claims to be pregnant and he returns to his mom�s trailer where he raps an improvised lullaby to his little sister. For much of the movie, Rabbit is a brooding somewhat introverted character. He travels to his work on the bus, headphones on, hooded and scribbling down new ideas for lyrics. However the movie and Eminem both come alive during the rap battles, which are central to the plot, where rival rappers verbally tear each other limb from limb in front of a hostile crowd. Taunting Rabbit with cries of �Elvis� and comments about his mother and their trailer park home, this is Eminem in his equivalent of Rocky�s boxing ring or General Maximus Decimus Meridus�s coliseum. Rabbit must overcome his own fears and self-doubt in order to emerge triumphant.
Out-with this critics will say that Director Curtis Hanson (The Wonder Boys) has deliberately restricted Eminem to a range of acting, which does not require much flexing of thespian muscle. However, this is something of a moot point because it works. Eminem looks good. It is a credible and understated performance and 8 Mile is an entertaining and uplifting movie, which showcases his great talent. As always, Curtis Hanson�s direction is flawless and he has surrounded Slim Shady with an excellent supporting cast. In particular, Mekhi Phifer (ER) as Rabbit�s best buddy �Future�, Brittany Murphy (Don�t Say A Word) as would be trashy new girlfriend Alex, Evan Jones as the dopey Cheddar Bob and Kim Basinger are all excellent.
Perhaps not the most original story ever told, 8 Mile has been compared to Rocky, Saturday Night Fever and A Star Is Born. However, it is refreshing to see that 8 Mile is free of a traditional Hollywood ending and instead finishes on a more realistic note with an important message; Dreams cannot be realised if all you do is dream. Hard work and perseverance are the keys to success and the only person you can totally rely upon is yourself.
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on March 22, 2004
Okay, so like, Eminem is a poor white rapper on the wrong side of town in Detroit. The roads are numbered, and 8 mile is the bad area where the prostitutes are. I know this, because Maleficent lived near (but not in 8 mile, heavens no!) there.
Apparently, there's a whole rap culture going on. Eminem, playing a guy named Rabbit, finally starts to realize that the world he lives in sucks. Actually, he's always known that, but he was embarassed about it. The movie is about him coming to terms with who he is and where he comes from.
And that's about it. For the most part, 8 Mile is a very clean movie. It has all the same plot of a Rocky movie -- poor guy competes against big winner against all odds. Big bad winner has an outside-of-the-competition conflict with underdgo/protagonist. There's a girl from whom the protagonist draws his strength. And he has friends who are faithful to him to the end.
There's some important differences. In this movie, the girl is actually a [...] sleeping her way to the top. But the movie recognizes that her way is just as valid as anyone else's to get out of the hell hole they live in.
Additionally, the whole final contest -- a freestyle showdown involving rap -- is basically meaningless. Winning isn't about the admiration of people who could give a crap if Rabbit lives or dies. It's about him finally putting his demons to rest by admitting he's white trash. Rabbit draws upon the raw ugliness of his background to pull himself up by his bootstraps -- not his girlfriend, not his family, and not his friends.
And for that, you can respect Rabbit. At the end of the movie, he doesn't go on to become a rapping champion or getting that sweet record deal. He goes back to work.
Formulaic? Yes. Is Eminem a great actor? Hardly. But the movie doesn't try to be more than it is, and for that it earns my respect.
The only thing that seriously mars it is Eminem's "I'm friends to all the gays" rap. His gay pal covers for him at work and Rabbit defends him with his rap.
If you've forgotten, Eminem was seriously slammed for his homophobic lyrics. Eminiem seems to be trying to say that's part of his language. In other words, it's not that HE'S homophobic, it's just part of his speech. Which is complete and utter crap. Reality is, the culture he comes from is homophobic, and that's just the way it is. Ironically, in trying to pretend he recognizes his roots, Eminem rejected the ugly parts.
Please -- those moments in the film reminded me that this is a movie whose sole purpose is to perpetuate the myth and legend of Eminem. A black mark on an otherwise servicable film.
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on July 21, 2003
I've never been crazy about Eminem, but he makes an auspicious debut with confidence and command. Curtis Hanson, director, has always paid great attention to detail (think "L A Confidential") and, once again, uses Kim Basinger to good advantage. Eminem, indeed, had a tough role; to maintain his identity while taking care of his crazy mother, and showing genuine love for his little sister; then, to deal with a flaky girlfriend and a gang of Detroit "Urbanites" (for wont of a better word). His performance is complete. There's a terrific 2.35:1 Widescreen, showing all the craziness of the audiences, and the bleakness of the slums. Powerful! My only complaint is, at the beginning, the music overpowered the dialogue quite often. The Sound director got it together about half way through, but there were some important dialogues at the beginning that helped you to know what his problem was, and it required a bit of attention. Eminem's music appeals to many (he wrote ALL of the music), but I chose to buy it because some reliable friends told me how good it was as drama. Yes, it's good. It's also one of those "David & Goliath" films, where the underdog makes good. I actually like those kinds of films. Eminem did a fine job; but can he do "Hamlet"? Keanu Reeves did.
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on April 16, 2003
So here it is, the movie ‘debut’ of Eminem, the man once referred to by President Bush as 'the most dangerous threat to American children since polio'. Directed by Curtis Hanson (previously responsible for the excellent LA Confidential), Marshall Mathers III stars as Jimmy ‘B. Rabbit’ Smith, a wannabe rapper struggling to break of a life of poverty on the wrong side of Detroit’s 8 Mile Road.
8 Mile opens with B. Rabbit about to go on stage to take part in an open mic rap contest at a rap venue called ‘The Shelter’. Plagued by nerves, he throws up in the bathroom and down his sweater before going on stage, where in front of a cynical and somewhat hostile back audience he completely dries up in an embarrassing case of stage fright. Homeless and car-less after splitting up with his ‘pregnant’ girlfriend he has to return to his mother’s trailer home, whereupon he disturbs his mother (Kim Basinger) mid-coital with her younger lover Greg. As if that is not embarrassing enough his mother later confides to a horrified Rabbit that she is having problems with her sex life because Greg wont go down on her.
Almost everything in 8 Mile suggests that this is less than fiction and whilst perhaps not quite autobiographical it is certainly quasi-autobiographical. Much like a pre-superstardom Eminem, his character Jimmy has an absentee father, he hangs around with a multiracial crew and takes part in rapping competitions. Jimmy’s mother is a drunken fool neglecting her four-year old daughter, whilst living with a no-good loser virtually the same age as her son, in a squalid trailer. Jimmy’s crew dream of becoming rap stars and see their rhyming skills as being their best hope of getting out of the inner city deprivation and urban wasteland of America’s famous motor city. However, whilst dreaming of a way out of the urban wasteland and poverty that surrounds him Rabbit still has to work a day job in a steel pressing plant where his boss gives him a hard time for his time-keeping and attitude.
Eminem is not just the most famous rapper in America, he is quite simply the biggest star on the planet. In the superstardom stakes he is, if you will pardon the comparison, the new Michael Jackson (without the chimp, the plastic surgery, the dance moves and with a great deal more profanity). Of course 8 Mile isn't actually Eminem’s film debut; that was in The Wash, Dr Dre and Snoop Dogg's ill-conceived remake of the 70’s flick ‘Car Wash’, where he made a cameo appearance as a phone-stalker psycho. As The Wash proved, rap artists don’t necessarily make great actors or great films (remember Vanilla Ice in the cringeworthy Cold As Ice anyone?) and with the exception of Ice Cube and Tupac Shakur, very few have actually made the transition from music to movies as well as this.
Perhaps not an obviously heroic figure Eminem's public persona has been somewhat modified in his role as Jimmy ‘Rabbit’ Smith. Jimmy’s actions are anti-homophobic (he comes to the defence of one of his gay colleagues), he is positively passive (rather than verbally violent) to all the women in his life regardless of how much they wrong him. Indeed the movie opens with Rabbit having given his car and home away to his ex-girlfriend who claims to be pregnant and he returns to his mom’s trailer where he raps an improvised lullaby to his little sister. For much of the movie, Rabbit is a brooding somewhat introverted character. He travels to his work on the bus, headphones on, hooded and scribbling down new ideas for lyrics. However the movie and Eminem both come alive during the rap battles, which are central to the plot, where rival rappers verbally tear each other limb from limb in front of a hostile crowd. Taunting Rabbit with cries of “Elvis” and comments about his mother and their trailer park home, this is Eminem in his equivalent of Rocky’s boxing ring or General Maximus Decimus Meridus’s coliseum. Rabbit must overcome his own fears and self-doubt in order to emerge triumphant.
Out-with this critics will say that Director Curtis Hanson (The Wonder Boys) has deliberately restricted Eminem to a range of acting, which does not require much flexing of thespian muscle. However, this is something of a moot point because it works. Eminem looks good. It is a credible and understated performance and 8 Mile is an entertaining and uplifting movie, which showcases his great talent. As always, Curtis Hanson’s direction is flawless and he has surrounded Slim Shady with an excellent supporting cast. In particular, Mekhi Phifer (ER) as Rabbit’s best buddy ‘Future’, Brittany Murphy (Don’t Say A Word) as would be trashy new girlfriend Alex, Evan Jones as the dopey Cheddar Bob and Kim Basinger are all excellent.
Perhaps not the most original story ever told, 8 Mile has been compared to Rocky, Saturday Night Fever and A Star Is Born. However, it is refreshing to see that 8 Mile is free of a traditional Hollywood ending and instead finishes on a more realistic note with an important message; Dreams cannot be realised if all you do is dream. Hard work and perseverance are the keys to success and the only person you can totally rely upon in this life is yourself.
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on March 29, 2003
Rapper Eminem makes a spectacular screen debut in "8 Mile," a film designed to showcase the performer's talents as singer, songwriter and, now, actor.
In this semi-autobiographical tale, Eminem plays a young white rapper named Jimmy who is struggling to achieve respectability and recognition in an area dominated almost exclusively by black artists. We've seen this story before in films ranging from "The Hustler" to "The Cincinnati Kid" to "Rocky": the hotshot, talented newcomer attempts to make a name for himself in some specialized area (be it pool, poker, boxing or rapping) by challenging and defeating the highly respected and established reigning champ. In terms of plotting, "8 Mile" offers little that is new or exciting, but what makes the movie work is the fine sense of detail and texture that writer Scott Silver and director Curtis Hanson bring to the world they are showing us. Set in 1995 Detroit, the film superbly captures the unmitigated bleakness of its urban setting: from the burnt-out, abandoned buildings to the graffiti-covered walls to the dank, cavernous music clubs to the rundown trailer parks. Jimmy is caught in a world that offers the poor working class stiff little opportunity for hopes and dreams beyond those he can make for himself - and Jimmy has found rap music to be the best chance for his ticket out. Yet, Jimmy is no pie-in-the-sky idealist. He knows that he can't afford to put all his eggs into one basket and so he remains levelheaded and pragmatic in his aspirations and goals. Beyond the obvious handicap of his skin color, Jimmy is also having to cope with a crumbling relationship, an alcoholic mother, her abusive boyfriend and some "concerned" parties who, despite what they may say, may not always have Jimmy's best interest at heart.
Each of these characters has the potential to become nothing more than a hokey stereotype, but the acting and the writing keep most of it real most of the time. Kim Basinger, Mekhi Phifer, Britanny Murphy and several others all turn in fine performances in their roles, but it is Eminem himself who makes the film work. Jimmy, despite all the frustration and rage smoldering under the surface, comes across as a decent guy who wants to make something of himself and to help those people who mean the most to him in the process. Eminem is a natural on the screen, and it will be interesting to see if he will be able to so successfully inhabit a character who is not so carefully tailored to fit his ready-made persona. My suspicion is that he will, though only time - and his next few roles - will tell.
"8 Mile" affords a fascinating glimpse into a subculture that many of us have hitherto viewed only from the outside. Especially intriguing are the "hip-hop battles," wherein rappers come on stage and challenge one another to perform spontaneous mutual put-downs, with the audience getting to determine the contest's winner. No matter what one may feel about rap music itself, one has to admire the talent involved in composing these rhyming verses extemporaneously. The music may sometimes be execrable, but the love of language that pours forth out of the mouths of these young practitioners is actually quite encouraging and captivating (though one wishes that that talent would be channeled in a more positive direction at times).
An interesting side note: at one point, Jimmy recites a rap defending a homosexual co-worker. After all the bad blood that has gone down between Eminem and the gay community in the past, I wonder if this is the rapper's attempt to make peace and bury the hatchet. If so, it is a gesture well worth making.
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on March 23, 2003
8 MILE MUST BE IN EVERYONES DVD COLLECTION
THIS IS ONE OF THE BEST MOVIES THAT I HAVE BROUGHT SINCE "JOHN Q"
I THOUGHT THIS WAS A MOVIE ABOUT EMINEM'S LIFE BUT IT IS NOT
BUT HE PLAYS HIS PART IN THIS FILM TO WELL
BUT LOOK AT THE MAKING OF THE MOVIE AND HE WILL TELL YOU THAT IT ISN'T HIS LIFE STORY
I THINK HIM AND JIMMY "RABBIT" SMITH JR ARE ALOT ALIKE
EMINEM IN THIS FILM SHOWS US HIS TUFF AND WILD SIDE BUT ALSO SHOWS US HIS HUMAN SIDE
THE LOVE HE HAD FOR HIS FAMILY AND THE PASSION TO BECOME A RAPPER IN THIS MOVIE IS REMARKABLE
EMINEM IS A VERY DIVERSE AND TALENTED RAPPER AND IT REALLY SHOWS IN HIS ACTING
THIS FILM REMINDS ME SO MUCH OF "ROCKY" ITS SCAREY
BOTH FILMS TO ME ARE SAYING NO MATTER WHERE YOU COME FROM THAT IF YOU HAVE A DREAM YOU HAVE TO WORK HARD TO MAKE IT COME TRUE
NO MATTER WHAT PEOPLE SAY OR HOW SCARED YOU MAY BE
IF YOU BELEIVE IT CAN HAPPEN THAN IT WILL AND THAT IS WHAT YOU CALL FAITH
I HOPE THAT THEY MAKE ANOTHER MOVIE CALLED "THE NEXT 8 MILE"
ON THIS LAST NOTE EMINEM MAY SAY THINGS THAT SOME OF US MIGHT NOT AGREE ON BUT HE HAS TALENT AND WE HAVE TO TAKE OUR HATS OF TO HIM AND SAY "JOB WILL DONE!"
THANK YOU FOR TAKING TIME TO READING MY REVIEW
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on March 22, 2003
I have to say that I am not a fan of Eminem. Nothing personal, I just don't care for his music, excpet Lose Yourself, but I decided to check this out based on all the hype surrounding it and all the positive reviews it was given. It is a very good movie, and Eminim gives a dramatic, intense performance that I would never have expected. Everyone knows the premise of the film, a white rapper trying to make it. The films moves along quickly, has some intense rap battle sequences, and invloves Em's relationship with his mother played by Kim Basinger, and Brittany Murphy, the girl who convinces him to go for it all. Eminems performance is the standout of the film, but Brittany Murphy does an excellent job as Alex. She's sweet, sexy, and dangerous and it's always a pleasure to see Brittney in any film. Kim Basinger is way over the top. I didn't buy her performance one bit, and felt she was completely miscast. I highly recommend this film to all Eminem fans and even not his fans, since I am not one. I have a new respect for the guy. He is immensely talented, and now we have a reason why he is so successful. It is clear to me that it is Talent over Image.
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on October 29, 2003
I can save two hours of your life: 8Mile is the exact same movie as The Karate Kid.
Eminem is Daniel LaRusso. Mekhi Phifer is Mr. Miyagi. Brittany Murphy is Ali Mills (the love interest). And all the mean Detroit rappers are the Cobra Kai's.
The movie comes to climax as the reluctant warrior (Daniel-San/Eminem) battles at a open-mic "tournament." Just when you thought your wounded hero was down for the count he delivers a crushing blow that defeats the evil bully rappers.
This movie isn't horrible - but it ain't great either. Curtis Hanson did a much better job on LA Confidential.
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on March 31, 2016
8 mile was a great movie, except for I'm not a rapper, its exactly like my life story. I grew up extremely poor and I was also gang beaten by a group of black guys, just like Eminem in this movie, but he did had some good friends that were true to him and I really liked the depiction of good friendship that Eminem had with his boys. I am happy that Eminem turned out rich and famous and yet he is very resilient, and never forgets his painful childhood. I just wish Brittany Murphy and that other rapper guy, De'Angelo Wilson was still alive !!! :(
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on March 31, 2003
Of course i liked the movie, but the dvd added a lot more to it.
You get the superman video, and of course my favorite: the battles that weren't seen. My favorite part is where he goes against this one guy and he's not suppose to speak and he just decides to, and says: "hold on faggot, let me turn this mike on, don't think i was gonna let you get away with that song...." i can remember just laughing my you know what off!!!
So, yea, great movie...and hey it must be if em wins an oscar for "lose yourself", which is a great song!!!
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