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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Yes, the Evil One does eat babies...jelly babies, that is!
When Leela, a young huntress of the Sevateem tribe first encounters the Doctor, she calls him "the evil one" to which the Doctor disarmingly says, "Well, nobody's perfect, but that's overstating it a little. Would you like a jelly baby?"
So begins his association with one of his most memorable companions, she of the chamois leather outfit, leaving her arms and legs...
Published on Feb. 3 2004 by Daniel J. Hamlow

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3.0 out of 5 stars Welcome Leela!
This story is the introduction to new companion Leela and while i liked Leela as a companion, this story isn't the best. Not the worst but no more then a three star.
Published 2 months ago by Marcus Almighty


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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Yes, the Evil One does eat babies...jelly babies, that is!, Feb. 3 2004
By 
Daniel J. Hamlow (Narita, Japan) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
When Leela, a young huntress of the Sevateem tribe first encounters the Doctor, she calls him "the evil one" to which the Doctor disarmingly says, "Well, nobody's perfect, but that's overstating it a little. Would you like a jelly baby?"
So begins his association with one of his most memorable companions, she of the chamois leather outfit, leaving her arms and legs bare, but don't mess with her, as she knows how to use a knife and Janis thorns, weapons that paralyze, then kill.
Leela has been banished from the Sevateem for saying that their god Xoanon, doesn't exist. However, that's not all going on with the tribe. There's a power struggle going between Neeva, the shaman who claims personal contact with Xoanon, and Calib, whose belief is tenuous, but wants nothing more than to have Neeva exposed as a fraud and charlatan. The Sevateem want to liberate Xoanon from the Tesh, their sworn enemies who live beyond the wall in a mountain, however, the Evil One's invisible energy creatures prevent anything from happening.
The Doctor and Leela go to the mountain, where he says, "I must have made quite an impression," for he sees his own face carved on the mountainside like Mount Rushmore. Trouble is, he can't remember when he first came to the planet. Also, the voice of Xoanon is his own! But does Xoanon have all his marbles? At one point, it says "At last us... you, me, us, we... at last I shall be free of us!" When the Doctor asks Xoanon who he is, Xoanon asks back "Don't I know?"
Paradise comes from the Avestan (ancient Persian) word meaning "walled-in enclosure." In that vein, Leela says of Xoanon, "he dwells within the black wall wherein lies paradise." This draws on the theme of an ideal place made safe from evil by a wall.
Many praiseworthy lines come in from the Doctor. "Answers are easy. It's asking the right questions which is hard." and "The very powerful and the very stupid have one thing in common. They don't alter their views to fit the facts. They alter the facts to fit their views." And in an exchange regarding faith and logic, Neeva says "We start getting proof and we stop believing." Tomas replies, "With proof, you don't have to believe."
Louise Jameson's debut as Leela is impressive here and throughout the other eight stories she comes out in. Despite the Doctor telling her off for killing people, even in self-defense, it has to be said that she saves the Doctor's life that way in this story and in those to come. After all, she's using her huntress's instinct. I'd have her as my minder anyday.
Of the supporting actors, David Garfield (Neeva) stands out. His attempts to exorcise the Doctor, whom he thinks is the Evil One, is one of the kitschy moments of the series. And his battle hat is indeed fetching, as it's a cricket glove with some odds and ends attached.
The original title The Day God Went Mad is more apropos, as the Doctor has to deal with an omniscient computer with schizophrenia. However, it was changed to The Face To Evil to ward off any potential religious objections. The ideas are creative, but the production values, such as the Sevateem's forest and a spaceship's corridors aren't much to shout home about, and only a few characters (Leela, Neeva, Tomas) stand out.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars You, me, us, we, at last I shall be free from us!, Feb. 1 2004
By 
Daniel J. Hamlow (Narita, Japan) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
When Leela, a young huntress of the Sevateem tribe first encounters the Doctor, she calls him "the evil one" to which the Doctor disarmingly says, "Well, nobody's perfect, but that's overstating it a little. Would you like a jelly baby?" When they hear some ominous growls, he tells her "Do you have four friends with very bad colds or are we in danger?" She says, "They're your creatures." Has he been here before?
So begins his association with one of his most memorable companions, she of the chamois leather outfit, leaving her arms and legs bare, but don't mess with her, as she knows how to use a knife and Janis thorns, weapons that paralyze, then kill.
Leela has been banished from the Sevateem for saying that their god Xoanon, doesn't exist. However, that's not all going on with the tribe, whose gesture to ward evil coincidentally resembles the sequence for checking seals on a Starfall 7 spacesuit. There's a power struggle going between Neeva, the shaman who claims personal contact with Xoanon, and Calib, whose belief is tenuous, but wants nothing more than to have Neeva exposed as a fraud and charlatan. The Sevateem want to liberate Xoanon from the Tesh, their sworn enemies who live beyond the wall in a mountain, however, the Evil One's invisible energy creatures prevent anything from happening.
The Doctor and Leela go to the mountain, where he says, "I must have made quite an impression," for he sees his own face carved on the mountainside like Mount Rushmore. Trouble is, he can't remember when he first came to the planet. The two go inside the mountain to solve the mystery of Xoanon, whom they hear communicating to Neeva. And the voice of Xoanon is his own! But does Xoanon have all his marbles? At one point, it says "At last us... you, me, us, we... at last I shall be free from us!" When the Doctor asks Xoanon who he is, Xoanon asks back "Don't I know?"
Paradise comes from the Avestan (ancient Persian) word meaning "walled-in enclosure." In that vein, Leela says of Xoanon, "he dwells within the black wall wherein lies paradise." This draws on the theme of an ideal place made safe from evil by a wall.
Many praiseworthy lines come in from the Doctor. "Answers are easy. It's asking the right questions which is hard." and "The very powerful and the very stupid have one thing in common. They don't alter their views to fit the facts. They alter the facts to fit their views." And in an exchange regarding faith and logic, Neeva says "We start getting proof and we stop believing." Tomas replies, "With proof, you don't have to believe."
Trivia: Leela's name came from Leila Khaled, a Palestinian woman who with her two comrades were the first hijackers and thus somewhat of a celebrity. Louise Jameson's debut as Leela is impressive here and throughout the other eight stories she comes out in. Despite the Doctor telling her off for killing people, even in self-defense, it has to be said that she saves the Doctor's life that way in this story and in those to come. After all, she's using her huntress's instinct. I'd have her as my minder anyday.
Of the supporting actors, David Garfield (Neeva) stands out. His attempts to exorcise the Doctor, whom he thinks is the Evil One, is one of the kitschy moments of the series. And his battle hat is indeed fetching, as it's a cricket glove with some odds and ends attached.
The original title The Day God Went Mad is more apropos, as the Doctor has to deal with an omniscient computer with schizophrenia. However, it was changed to The Face To Evil to ward off any potential religious objections. The ideas are creative, but the production values, such as the Sevateem's forest and a spaceship's corridors aren't much to shout home about, and only a few characters (Leela, Neeva, Tomas) stand out.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars, July 3 2014
By 
Gabriel Daniel (Montreal, Quebec, Canada) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
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This review is from: Doctor Who: The Face of Evil (DVD)
Très bon service et produit.
Merci,
Gabriel Daniel
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3.0 out of 5 stars Welcome Leela!, May 4 2014
By 
Marcus Almighty - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Doctor Who: The Face of Evil (DVD)
This story is the introduction to new companion Leela and while i liked Leela as a companion, this story isn't the best. Not the worst but no more then a three star.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Then I saw my face and now I've got Leela, June 30 2002
By 
Junglies (Morrisville, NC United States) - See all my reviews
This story is another in the darker period of Doctor Who. Having jettisoned the increasingly Andy Pandy jump-suited Sarah Jane Smith before an apparently final battle with the Master, the Doctor foregoes his Presidency to return to roaming around the Galaxy.
The plot has been laid out by several reviewers before me and I will not travel that well trodden road any further. Suffice to say that the character of Leela clearly is intended to attract an older audience but at the same time, the darker stories required a much stronger character than the Sarah Jane Smith types in order for the plots to work. Leela is certainly that, a savage killer, brought up to kill or be killed, she is uneducated but not stupid. She has an instinct which saves them more than once and is yet very protective of the Doctor.
Part of the charm of this character was that she served as a role model for many other female actresses in British drama as an independent person, capable of holding her own with men.
The story is the first to acknowledge that time travel can have unintended future consequences which alters the future in a way never thought of. The two tribes are also symbolic of the way our modern society has developed into an environmental side as opposed to a scientific, technological side. The monster, not by accident, is the same as the monster in that classic sci-fi movie, whose name escapes me, but which is created through the scienytist's id when using alien machinery.
A very impressive story to have on video.
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5.0 out of 5 stars The Face of God, April 8 2002
By 
"waymakerjim" (Mars Hill, NC United States) - See all my reviews
Dr. Who arrives on an unnamed planet in the middle of a bloody war between to completely different tribes - one physical, courageous and strong-the other, mental, psychic and controlled- fighting to possess God.
God, in this case, is an intelligent computer that Dr. Who unknowingly made schizophrenic during an earlier visit to the planet. The God's madness started the war and it's up to Dr. Who to stop the war and avert the computer's self-destruction.
Thrown into the mix is the Dr.'s new assistant Leela.
A good episode of the series. Tom Baker is in high form, playing his role with relish while also playing to the camera. Leela, Louise Jameson, offers an interesting contrast-barbaric, emotional, quick to attack- to the Dr.'s way.
The show was written during the time of Von Danaaken's books-the Chariots of the Gods, et al., which hinted that earth had been visited by aliens in pre/early history, with devastating consequences. THe show reflects contemporary ideas and hints that our religions could have been based on similar visits.
An interesting premise.
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4.0 out of 5 stars The very powerful & the very stupid have one thing in common, April 3 2002
By 
Amazon Customer (Not near Washington, DC) - See all my reviews
Coming right on the heels of THE DEADLY ASSASSIN, THE FACE OF EVIL shifts the series away from its earlier, "cozy" format, and in a pretty permanent sort of way. I often wondered why so few episodes dealt with the consequences of the Doctor's meddling in the affairs of other civilizations --this one takes the form of the Doctor confronting the spectacle of his own face carved into the side of a mountain on the scale of Mount Rushmore.
Originally titled "The Day that God Went Mad," this serial takes us into an unnamed planet in the distant future, where two tribal factions are locked in an eternal (and ultimately futile) struggle, even though neither side has ever seen its enemy. The inherent danger offered by organized religion is taken to task in a way few episodes before (or since) were up to challenging: as usual, the local God has a perfectly logical, scientific explanation, but there's no explaining this to his devoted followers, particularly the quick-thinking high priest.
The episode is of course noteworthy because it introduces Leela, as portrayed by Louise Jameson, who remains one of the most popular companions of one of the most popular Doctors. Tom Baker carries off another brilliant performance, cheerfully spouting nonsense even as crossbows and poison darts are pointed in his direction. The episode also has the advantage of being part of Season Thirteen, which is definitely Tom Baker's high point as the Doctor. There is stark contrast between the aggressively savage Sevateem and the quietly fanatical Tesh, and it is this contrast which leads the Doctor to the story's climax: the local God is a divided personality and must be made whole --and the Doctor himself is the original cause of the problem! Besides Ms. Jameson, my favorite character in this serial is Neeva (David Garfield), the High Priest who starts out as Xoanon's most devoted and vocal follower, but who proves to be quite the jaded cynic when all is said and done. Worth your time if you're a Tom Baker fan, but can be safely left off your Top Ten Greatest Doctor Who Stories Ever list.
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5.0 out of 5 stars At its best!, March 8 2002
By 
kentuckyreader (Louisville, Kentucky USA) - See all my reviews
This is Dr. Who at its best, in my opinion. The story is strong and intricate; the science is integral to the plot's resolution; the one liners from Baker are witty, instead of just kind of funny, as can occasionally happen; surprisingly quotable truisms from The Doctor about human nature are periodically inserted, without being too didactic; and the energy is high - the story doesn't mire down as it can in some episodes.
This probably won't end up as your favorite episode, but it may end up as one of those Dr. Whos that will always get the comment out of you: "Oh, I like that one!"
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3.0 out of 5 stars Louise, Oct. 3 2001
By A Customer
This is the first story for Louise Jammeson (Leela) In which The Doctor (Tom Baker) meets a schitziod computer of the doctor. some neat monstors but some preety hoaky ones too. Louise gets better with time. Many did not like her because she wore animal skins. She is the first companion since Sarah Jane Smith left the show. Hope you like the shows.
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3.0 out of 5 stars Witty lines, average story, Aug. 23 2000
By 
M. Wilson "mikew75" (Los Angeles, CA) - See all my reviews
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Chris Boucher's flair for the one-liner was evident in every script he penned for the series, and The Face of Evil is no exception. The Doctor's utterances after being threatened by members of Leela's tribe are hysterical, as is Tom Baker's "jelly-baby" routine (something inserted by Baker himself, if I'm not mistaken). The Face of Evil features an interesting premise, and the tribal dynamics of the Sevateem are convincingly explored. Louise Jameson's debut as Leela is very good, unfortuneately she is never as strong a character in later adventures as she is here (except for perhaps "Horror of Fang Rock). All-in-all, an average though enjoyable story.
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